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History Club - Any Ideas?


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#1 stevenyelland

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Posted 19 July 2008 - 01:58 PM

Hello Folks,

We are starting a History Club in September (King's School, Pontefract)- Wednesday after school.
We want to get the new Year 7's on board but also plan to use the Club to promote KS4 teaching.
Does anyone experience of running one of these? Would appreciate advice/resource suggestions people have used and worked well with the pupils.

Thanks in advance :teacher:

#2 debby

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 09:42 AM

Hello Folks,

We are starting a History Club in September (King's School, Pontefract)- Wednesday after school.
We want to get the new Year 7's on board but also plan to use the Club to promote KS4 teaching.
Does anyone experience of running one of these? Would appreciate advice/resource suggestions people have used and worked well with the pupils.

Thanks in advance :teacher:



Im afraid i dont have any experience in this. However i have been debating on whether to start a History film club. This stems from the fact that my year 9's boys love History films and are always on at me to show them. Students would learn the topic then watch the film to pick out historical inaccuracies/ bloopers etc. Has anyone else tried this?

#3 Rachel H

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 09:34 AM

Im afraid i dont have any experience in this. However i have been debating on whether to start a History film club. This stems from the fact that my year 9's boys love History films and are always on at me to show them. Students would learn the topic then watch the film to pick out historical inaccuracies/ bloopers etc. Has anyone else tried this?
[/quote]

This is exactly what I do. we watched films like Titanic and Robin Hood Prince of Thieves. Pupils then explored the historical innacuracies and wrote a film report. I'm hoping to continue this next year.
Rachel
"Everybody lies." Dr Gregory House.

#4 Neil DeMarco

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 04:53 PM

How about a history film drama club in which you or the pupils write a script on an historical theme, storyboard it, shoot it using a video camera, edit it and then post it onto the internet? I've done this with the Cuban Missiles Crisis with Year 10s and I will be posting it to the internet (YouTube) in the next two days (now that I've got all the parental consent forms in). I'll post when I've done it and you can see what it looks like.
"Lesson planning is best undertaken when walking from the staffroom to the classroom. More detailed planning, by walking more slowly."

#5 Neil DeMarco

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 06:21 PM

Here it is. It lasts five minutes:
Cuban Missiles Crisis

If the link doesn't work, try typing Chesham Dude into the You Tube search.
"Lesson planning is best undertaken when walking from the staffroom to the classroom. More detailed planning, by walking more slowly."

#6 stevenyelland

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Posted 22 July 2008 - 11:20 PM

Excellent ideas so far - thanks folks! :teacher:

#7 jennyroberts

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 07:10 AM

Hi really like the idea of drama linked to History, I love Utube, would be great to incorporate with this.

What age range do you have in your club? What other topics have you looked at? We are an arts specialist college so I know we have the equipment to do the filming.

I just wondered how year 7s would cope with Cuban missile crisis, or was the club aimed at KS4?
A great way to raise the profile of the department, and a great way to study history especially for students who dont like writing much. thanks for the ideas.

#8 Lou Phillips

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Posted 29 July 2008 - 02:54 PM

I ran a year 7 history club- we did some topical stuff (like massive glittery displays on Guy Fawkes night- this was my best attended session, but I did bring bonfire toffee etc!), spent a few weeks building castles, put on a piece at the Christmas show about the WW1 truce, and watched movies looking at the history behind them. Other suggestions we didn't get round to would be making Roman mosaics or medieval illuminated letters.
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#9 Emma Depper

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Posted 31 July 2008 - 09:03 AM

I have run a club for several years. I started with Year 7 and thought they would lose interest when they got older. Nothing could be further than the truth they practically run it themselves these days. The only draw back being I canīt get rid of them!
They produce a History Journal termly and choose what to put in it, they edit it I do the final proof read. They run Open Evening which is an absolute godsend. Last year they dressed up as Henry and his wives, made up and performed their own historical playlets etc etc They showed all parents round and I was totally redundant, which was ace.
They have been doing their own research on local history and plan to display their findings. Some of the girls have been researching past fashions and plan to make some dresses over the holidays to wear at Open Evening this year. I just encourage and give the odd idea or bit of advice!

#10 Dave Wallbanks

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Posted 13 October 2010 - 06:32 AM

A great website for ideas for history clubs
I'm just trawling the internet for ideas as to what I can do with my students during our weekly history club. I've got an enthusiastic bunch of students so I'm looking for new activities. Here are just some from this website.

Roman herb garden 1

Students plan a Roman herb garden, researching what herbs were used (or just doing a listening or reading and selecting from the seeds that are available) and then planting the seeds. They can then write about how the plants are growing and about the taste of the herbs and how they used them in food. You can add language by describing the seeds they must select and extra crafts by getting them to make labels for each section of the garden with pictures of the herbs that will grow there.


Greek and Roman statues 1

Students make Greek and Roman statues from Playdoh, Blutack or clay from written or spoken instructions (e.g. "She doesn't have any arms" for the Venus di Milo), then compare with the original.

Greek and Roman statues 2

Put cut out body parts from pictures of different statues on the board or the floor. Students explain which parts they want and then stick them together to make their own statues. Give prizes for the craziest, most beautiful, best matching, scariest etc.

Ancient monsters

This is similar to the activity above. Students tell the teacher which body parts they want (e.g. "Can we have the unicorn's horn, please?" or "We want the legs at the bottom left"). They then make a collage monster from them, and you can give prizes for the scariest, cutest, most like a "real" monster etc.

Roman clothes
From written or spoken instructions, students make a toga from a sheet and/ or Roman army sandals from flip flops and ribbon. To make it easier, you can get them to put pictures in order while reading or listening, and then try it out to confirm if they have put them in the right order. Alternatively, you can give the texts about the sandals and toga mixed up, then students split up the texts, put them in order, and then try to make the clothes. It is also possible to make the toga for a teddy bear or a cut out cardboard figure if you use a small piece of sheet.
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#11 Kay Devonshire

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Posted 17 October 2010 - 11:00 AM

Thanks for this, Dave, I'm starting my first one (after 8 years of contemplation) after half term. We're kicking off with dead heads, paper mache gore fest, but we were a bit thin on ideas after that. This is grand.

Kay.

#12 Gidz

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Posted 17 October 2010 - 10:16 PM

As well as genealogy and local studies, I was once at a school where the "History Club/Society" was a study of conspiracies and mysteries!

* JFK
* Jack the Ripper
* 1605: Gunpowder Plot
* Lord Lucan
* The Death of Rasputin
* The Case of Anna Anderson
* Etc

In this way, the student's attention was grabbed by the unsual and the gloves were off when it came to the most outlandish of theories. It was good in fostering skills in interpretation, evidence and bias, CRAVEN (Credibility, Relevance, Ability to See, Vested Interest, Expertise and Neutrality). We also used it as a platform to teach/imbue higher level examination of sources and those considering law, management science, etc. It was a great way of introducing Critical Thinking AS to Y10s and even some G&T Y9s.

At it's best we had 35 students on a lunchtime and had to draft in extra-staff.


Hope this helps -




Gidz




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