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SHP - - Active Teaching Classroom Ideas


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#1 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 11:48 AM

I took a lot of inspiration from Ian's Saturday night activity and used it for our Yr. 6 Induction Day but switched it to the Tollund Man - they went out going 'fantastic' and 'brilliant'!

Have written it up - just waiting for my colleague to write her bits as well!

#2 Tony Fox

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 05:24 PM

I took a lot of inspiration from Ian's Saturday night activity and used it for our Yr. 6 Induction Day but switched it to the Tollund Man - they went out going 'fantastic' and 'brilliant'!

Have written it up - just waiting for my colleague to write her bits as well!


I assume you spoke to Ian about writing up the instructions and posting it on his site?
If not, please do, as I am throwing about some ideas about an anglo-saxon grave, and your idea sounds similar, can I steal it please? :teacher:
"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr

#3 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 06:08 PM

We are writing it up partly because it was snapped up as an example of outstanding practice in school.

We also want to keep it as an activity that all can use.

Once we have all of it I will send it to Ian.

#4 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 07:22 PM

Just because Tony asked so nicely...

I took inspiration from Ian and working alongside my colleague Sue at school we have put together the following lesson plan (borrowing heavily from Dawson genius). The formal writing of the lesson is for school reasons.


Tollund Man Mystery


Introduction

Like all of the most effective activities in History lessons, this one began with the diagnosis of a learning problem – just how much students hate using sources to answer questions. The moment that a History teacher mentions source investigation is usually the moment that students across all Key Stages switch off in lessons. So what if the historical investigation was the Tollund Man’s body in a crime scene, sources become police evidence, the teachers the detectives and the students assume the role of forensic investigators? Suddenly sources seem more like fun!

The following activity, developed by Susan Edwards and Nichola Boughey, at Weatherhead High School Media Arts College, Wallasey, helped their Year 7 students develop better source work and investigation skills without realizing that they were doing so amongst the fun. Here Nichola and Susan describe how they developed and resourced the activity for their 50 minute lesson but there’s plenty of scope for varying the props to use as the various items of kit.

This activity is based on the “Enquiry” style of model.

Objectives and Outline

The purpose of this activity is to enable the students to develop source skills in a relaxed and enjoyable manner. Students will learn about Iron Age lifestyles, religions, customs, and treatment of cowards, traitors and slaves all through the examination of how the Tollund Man died. This enables pupils to build a fuller picture of the life of a person living on mainland Europe during the Iron Age.

In brief, this VAK activity sets up the classroom as a 1950s crime scene. The whole class will play the role of the Danish police investigators and are distributed around the classroom with a central space in the middle of the room set up as a crime scene complete with fake body and crime scene tape. The main individual role of the Chief Inspectors will be played by the class teachers or a colleague – in this particular case the lesson was team taught with both History teachers involved and leading the activity at different times supported by their teaching partner.

Learning Objectives

This activity is therefore intended to help students develop an understanding of:

• the nature of Iron Age life, i.e. treatment of slaves, cowards, traitors and captured enemy soldiers
• the importance of religion on Iron Age people in Europe
• how sources can be used effectively to solve or discuss historical events

The NC Key Objectives for History that will be met by the Tollund Man Mystery will be the development of student awareness regarding cultural, ethnic and religious diversity in different past European societies.

Through the outlined activity below students used the key NC processes of:

• historical enquiry
• the use of historical evidence
• developing the ability to communicate about the past.

Lesson Preparation

For the preparation of the lesson, it was decided to create a fake body to represent the Tollund Man. This ‘body’ was life-sized and based on photograph of the Tollund Man. It was made out of chicken wire, covered in modroc, and then painted to give it a more authentic look. This took approximately 15 hours to make, but was considered to be worth the time as this would be a lesson taught by all members of the History Department in the future. Other props are needed for the lesson including; a piece of rope, neck ring (both of these are to be placed around the neck of the body), a leather belt (placed around the body’s waist) seeds, a tin of soup and dried flowers.

PowerPoint slides of evidence would also need to be printed off, laminated and sealed in an envelope and placed on the desks. These sources would contain a picture and some text information for each group to look at and read out to the rest of the class. The PowerPoint should also be shown to the rest of the class on the IWB when each group is reading out their source.

When teaching this lesson, we were fortunate to have a fifteen-minute break, during which we were able to set up the classroom for this lesson. For the lesson to have its full impact, it would be necessary for the teacher to set up the room fully before the students entered. Attached is a suggested classroom plan.

The students need to work in groups and the classroom layout should reflect this. The Tollund Man should be placed in the centre of the room, and covered so that the students cannot see what is under it. Crime scene tape is placed around the body to add to the sense of mystery. Each group has an envelope of evidence on their desk which they will open when instructed to. The back wall of the classroom is used as an evidence wall, which will be used during the course of the lesson.

Lesson Delivery

Step One: Discovery

The key to having a good start to this lesson is for both teachers to greet the students at the classroom door already acting in their roles as police inspectors from Denmark (wearing police hats really grabs student attention straight away) One teacher gives each student a card numbered 1-5 (relates to pre-numbered tables) and one teacher explains that they are now acting as forensic investigators in Denmark. Once the students are sat down then one teacher assumes the explanation role. Explain that the purpose of this activity is to investigate the discovery of a dead body in Tollund Fen in Denmark in 1950 and how the person was killed. The students can already see the covered dead body and their curiosity will be peaked!

Then:

a ) Ask the students to close their eyes. Both teachers can check that this is happening.

b ) Teacher One changes the police cap for a farmer’s cap and picks the spade up.

c ) Teacher Two asks the students to mime picking up a spade and dig in front of them.

d ) Teacher One bangs the spade on the floor next to the crime scene and make a shocked sound. Teacher Two removes the cloth from the dead body.

e) Students will open their eyes and see the newly uncovered dead body & a picture of the Tollund Man’s face on the IWB.

f) Teacher One explains to the students how they have discovered the dead body whilst digging peat and are now watching it whilst somebody calls the police.

g) Teacher One then asks the students what questions they might have about the dead body before the police arrive.

After attending an INSET on ‘Teaching Outstanding Lessons’, Susan was given an insight into the core considerations that could be adapted to assist teachers in planning and delivering ‘outstanding lessons’ to OFSTED criteria. One of these core considerations is to prepare students’ minds, as it is important to focus the students and engage them as soon as they enter the classroom. The teachers should aim to create a sense of urgency and mystery at the start of the lesson. This could be achieved with the teachers dressing up or in role, as well as the crime scene that the students encounter on their entrance to the classroom. The first task that could be given to the students could be for them to think and write down five questions they would like to ask about the crime scene.

This gives the students time to develop both HOTS and develop their own PLTS because there are no right or wrong questions here – it is all very open ended and the students can be as creative and innovative as they want to be with their questioning based on what they can see.

Step Two: The Investigation

This is where the investigation of the different pieces of evidence (sources) takes place. Across the back wall of the classroom are three notices:

1. Murder
2. Suicide
3. Sacrifice

- Teacher Two asks the students if they understand what the three words on the notices mean (fully expect students to struggle with sacrifice but this one is the one that needs the most explanation as it is the most relevant) giving them plenty of time to answer.

- Teacher One explains that the students will now examine some evidence to try and discover the identity of the dead body, how old he is and how he died?

- Each table has two envelopes with a source in each that relates to the PPT slides.

- Teacher One directs each table to open envelopes one at a time (A-I) and the students will discuss the evidence and decide under which heading they wish to place the evidence.

Step Three: Evidence

Evidence A – Rope Noose and Iron Neck Ring

- Students will have already noticed the iron ring and noose around the body’s neck. Source A is a picture of the items plus some text for the students to read out.

- Teacher action/explanation – get the students to try and work out what relevance the noose and neck ring have. The teachers should draw out the ideas that criminals, slaves and captured enemy warriors would have been forced to wear iron rings around their necks and also may have been executed (murdered) by strangulation. It is also an opportunity to raise the idea of a Spring Goddess.

- Students then vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence B – Scientific Report

- Students will read out Source B which is a copy of the Scientific Report . The class will then discuss it as a group to try and find out some key details.

- Teacher action/explanation – the role of the teacher here is to draw out the student’s ideas about the age of the body, how long ago the person died and why the fact that the seeds in the man’s stomach were Spring related may be important. (Evidence bags with seeds and squished plants make very effective additional evidence (you could hide the bag under the dead body and get a student to retrieve it).

- Students then vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence C – The German Tribes

- Students will read out Source C which is a simple statement about German Tribes hanging traitors and cowards.

- Teacher action/explanation – Teacher One will be accused of being a traitor in front of the class by Teacher Two – use some excuse, i.e. told a secret to a friend. This leads into a discussion about what type of action would a traitor in the Iron Age be accused of, i.e. helping the enemy or stealing food from the tribe.

- Teacher action/explanation – Teacher Two can be accused on being a coward – afraid of spiders. Get the class to draw out other words for coward, i.e. wimp, scared etc.

- The class will then discuss how both cowards and traitors were killed and vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence D – Earth Goddess Statue

- Students will read out Source D which is a simple sentence about Earth Goddess statues being found in Danish Peat Bogs.

- Teacher action/explanation – this is a key point to re-enforce that Earth Goddess statues were linked to Spring Time (with subtle questioning redirect students back to seeds, soup and the scientific report information as well as how neck rings were placed on people’s bodies as offerings to Earth Goddess).

- Students then vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence E – Spring Goddess Statue Sacrifice

- Students will read out Source E which is provides information about the sacrifice of slaves to the Spring Goddess.

- Teacher action/explanation – As the student is reading out the evidence Teacher One should remove the noose and neck ring from around the dead bodies neck. Teacher Two should will explain to the students that tribes often fought each other and if enemy warriors were captured they were often more valuable alive as slaves than dead – this was a common practice at this time – hence the neck ring. Teacher One makes a big deal about declaring themselves stronger, tougher and a better warrior (they are holding the neck ring and noose) whilst Teacher Two has to make it evident that they are weaker and have been captured (kneeling on the floor with their head bowed works well and made the class laugh). Teacher One asks the class how can they make it obvious that Teacher One now belongs to them as an Iron Age slave – they will suggest putting the neck ring around Teacher Two’s neck.

- Teacher Two then very grumpily explains that one of their duties as a slave was to wash the cart that carries the statues of the Spring Goddess and that they accidentally touched it – Teacher One can then demand that they be sacrificed.

- Students then vote on whether this evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence F – Traitors, Cowards and Low Morals

- Students will read out Source F which is provides information about the sacrifice of people with low morals to the Spring Goddess.

- Teacher action/explanation – Teacher Two will accuse Teacher One of having low morals in front of the class – use some excuse, i.e. lied. This leads into a discussion about what type of person has low morals – criminal is where you are going with this.

- Students then vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence G – Cremation

- Students will read out Source G which is provides information about how most Iron Age people were cremated apart from those people who were sacrificed.

- Teacher action/explanation – get the students to try and make the link between the noose around the dead body and the fact that he was not cremated.

- Students then vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence H – Slave

- Students will read out Source E which is provides information Iron Age slaves.

- Teacher action/explanation – refer back to Evidence E.

- Students then vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Evidence I – X-Ray

- Students will read out Source I which is provides information the X-Rays taken of the Tollund Man’s neck.

- Teacher action/explanation – the aim here is to explain to students that criminals were often hung very violently but a sacrifice or suicide would have been more gentle and the neck would not have been broken.

- Students then vote on whether the evidence supports suicide, murder or sacrifice – they blue tack it under the heading that they choose.

Now that all of the evidence has been discussed and pinned up – the class now makes a decision.

Debriefing of the Students

Possibly keep the lesson the same, but next lesson or homework, include some other task. Students, in their groups, could write and film a short film / reconstruction of the death of Tollund Man for a ‘Crimewatch’ type show. Individually, write a crime report or newspaper report. Students could then use peer assessment to mark each other’s films or reports, perhaps someone from a different group so they might take a different slant on what they think happened to Tollund Man. We would perhaps include some sort of written activity for the students to complete during the lesson. This could be used to support future tasks. A table of some sort?

Teacher Reflections on the Activity

• Great lesson for enthusing students when they are using sources.

• ‘Outstanding’ start to the lesson. Grabbed their attention straight away.

• Great response from the students. They seemed engaged and mentioned as they were leaving that they thought that it was a really good lesson.

• A very effective lesson for all abilities, stretch and challenge will be achieved by appropriate questioning.

• Good for VAK learning.

• Cross-curricular elements (Drama, Geography, RE, PSHCE, Citizenship).

• A lot of effort for one lesson, but the follow-up to the lesson / homework etc could ensure it is worth it. Also, once resources are made, they can be used by the whole dept and in the future, as this is a lesson we would teach every year.

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Attached File  Tollund_Man.ppt   1.4MB   187 downloads



#5 jtblah

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 01:04 PM

Nichola, that sounds absolutely amazing!! Intimidatingly so actually - I like to think I put a lot of effort into my lessons, or at least I used to think that until I read your lesson plan! Thanks for sharing. :clapping:

#6 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 15 August 2009 - 01:53 PM

Seriously - we never write lesson plans like that normally! But my colleague Sue is a new Lead Learner at school and it was written up for a meeting where she was trying to show an example of outstanding practice in school to other teachers. We have gone a bit overboard - plus we are submitting it to Ian's site as well.

We have the resources now and will use it every year. We had a bit of help from another teacher who made the body whilst off work.

We don't do this EVERY lesson I promise. I also know what you mean by intimidating - that's how I felt after Ian's evening session at SHP - plus a lot of this was winged on the day and then written up afterwards!

I am attaching a few images so people can see what the body and the classroom looked like.

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#7 debra g

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 07:35 AM

This is fantastic! I've just planned a lesson series based on Tollund Man which I thought was reasonable 'active' but now I feel shamed! :)

#8 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 08:15 PM

This is fantastic! I've just planned a lesson series based on Tollund Man which I thought was reasonable 'active' but now I feel shamed! :)


Please Sue and I have been amused at people's reaction to this one lesson - we do lots of textbook stuff and paper based stuff as well.

It may amuse you all to know that Sue loaded these on Facebook and tagged the dead body as me!!!! That has been faintly amusing!

#9 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 10:12 PM

It may amuse you all to know that Sue loaded these on Facebook and tagged the dead body as me!!!! That has been faintly amusing!


Deadly amusing perhaps? If you want to volunteer to be buried in a classroom, the M62 isn't such a bad drive to Halifax.... and you could have a cheap autopsy done afterwards as part of the medicine course..... would save Mr C being trephined in September....

Great lesson plan by the way....

#10 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 10:51 PM

It may amuse you all to know that Sue loaded these on Facebook and tagged the dead body as me!!!! That has been faintly amusing!


Deadly amusing perhaps? If you want to volunteer to be buried in a classroom, the M62 isn't such a bad drive to Halifax.... and you could have a cheap autopsy done afterwards as part of the medicine course..... would save Mr C being trephined in September....

Great lesson plan by the way....



So a long drive, trephinning, death and autopsies are how you treat visiting teachers. Think I'll stay on the Wirral! Thanks for the offer though.

#11 jennyroberts

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 05:51 PM

A great idea. Would love to make a Tollmund man in our History club. How big was the figure and aprroximately how much modroc did you use? Looks expensive to buy.

#12 JenniferJames

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 07:01 PM

Is it too cheeky to ask the school arts technician to make it?!?

#13 Russel Tarr

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 09:22 AM

Fantastic lesson plan, really inspiring!

"There's an old saying about those who forget history. I don't remember it, but it's good" - Stephen Colbert

#14 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 26 August 2009 - 12:33 PM

It was Sue that put together the body with her boyfriend. I will check with her to see how much the modroc cost. Could you go G&T funding way if it is for a club?

There has been talk of us doing a cross-curricular lesson plan with Art where they will get Year 7s studying the Tollund Man to make the dead body in the future.

The body is lifesize. We got some very funny looks the day we both carried it into school from the boot of the car covered in a white cloth. It now lives on the top of Sue's shelf.

#15 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 27 August 2009 - 06:37 PM

Apparently it costs 30 for the modroc and the chicken wire!




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