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Using A Variety Of Learning Styles In Teaching.


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#1 Stephen Drew

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Posted 14 May 2003 - 09:04 PM

This seminar is about how to plan lessons, how to build a scheme of work and how to do this with as varied an approach as possible.

To some extent I believe that this seminar will simply act to reinforce much of what those taking part either by contributing or reading will already know. However I also believe that there is much to be gained from a fundamental reappraisal and assessment of how exactly the process of developing schemes of work and individual lessons to fit into a scheme of work can be made as varied, interesting and effective as possible.

Teaching and learning in the modern classroom has so many recognised facets that it is surely impossible not to wish to be innovative and experimental in your approach as a teacher. It has long been recognised that not all young people learn in the same way, and that not all students in a class receive the information that is given to them in the same way. A simple understanding of the psychological concept of learning styles using the Auditory, Visual and Kinaesthetic models would rapidly inform any teacher of the need to use a variety of teaching and learning approaches when building a scheme of work and the lessons to go into it. I have yet to meet any teachers who have even asserted a belief in the use of a single learning style for their classroom. Therefore in communicating to a wide range of teachers, as this seminar will doubtless do, I am convinced that it is safe ground to assume that there is a consensus on the need for a variety of teaching and learning styles to be put in place for a teacher to have success with the full range of their students.

When I come to plan a lesson I have in my mind just one solid thing - the question for the lesson. That is my starting point. The information and content is there to be fitted around whatever activities I choose to use in that lesson. By being totally open minded about how to actually deliver the lesson, planning becomes an exciting process where the activities will drive the lesson, not the need to be wedded to forcing the subject contents on to the students. As the lesson forms part of a scheme of lessons within the scheme of work, I already know which teaching and learning styles are being used within that scheme, and this enables me to either build upon the previously used approaches, or to bring in new approaches that will make use of alternative historical skills for students.

With all this in mind the process can begin. My approach is to gather together all of the available resources from those who have already tackled the topic I am creating a lesson on. As a Head of Department I make sure that I get hold of one copy of every new Key Stage 3 textbook that is published to see how each one approaches this topic. Each one will have different ideas that can inspire me as I work. I also go to SchoolHistory.co.uk and look at any resources that have been submitted there for extra ideas. As another source of ideas and techniques I find that there are plenty of old and new resource sheets in my department that have been used at some time in the past, and all of which contain ideas that can be referred to. Lesson planning to deliver a range of teaching and learning styles should seek to combine and innovate, working within and beyond existing resources. It is perfectly possible to take the existing subject content of one idea for a lesson and fit it into a completely different teaching and learning style.

As a History teacher I always seek to communicate with the other teachers in my school who deliver other subjects. Every subject has something to offer in the development of lessons. An English teacher can help in ideas on how to deliver complex subjects related to literacy or the use of poetry in History. A Drama teacher is an excellent resource to tap for ideas on how to get students to internalise and personalise a topic in history through role play. A Maths teacher can really help with ideas when you are putting numeracy into History lessons. Language teachers can have many good ideas on how to help students cope with the complexity of new language and key words from the past. The wealth of knowledge and ideas in every school is huge, so tapping it is eminently sensible.

The other key source of information that I use when developing lessons is feedback from students. This can come in the form of informal verbal feedback about previous lessons. The seemingly annoying "Can we do something interesting today Sir?" is in fact a very helpful comment if you are trying to engage your students preferred learning styles. The quality of work that students produce in response to a variety of lesson activities is also extremely valuable in helping to direct the activities that should be used in a series of lessons. Unsuccessful activities from previous lessons can be analysed and discussed as part of the planning process within a department. So feedback from colleagues is valuable in helping to formulate a successful range of lesson styles that will meet the needs and learning styles of your students. The use of work scrutinies and student interviews is therefore highly worthwhile to a teacher planning to create lessons using a range of learning styles.

At my school we have found that visual activities, sorting or ordering activities and comparison activities are the most successful teaching and learning styles for the vast majority of our students. Therefore these are the styles that we make most use of. However since these approaches are very flexible, it is possible to create a variety of lessons within a scheme of work. In addition we have particular areas that we wish to develop for our students where they show weaknesses. These include reading and extended writing. So these are also areas that required focus. So from these areas of knowledge, coupled with the availability of a wide range of resources, the planning process for lessons and schemes of work can occur. By combining an open minded approach to teaching and learning styles and the possession of detailed evidence on our students' successes, failures and preferred teaching and learning styles, it is possible to create a series of lessons for a scheme of work that covers a variety of learning styles.

What I aim to have done here is to set out my thoughts on how to approach the complex process of developing schemes of work and individual lessons to successfully tap into the wide range of learning styles possessed by students. For those at the start of their teaching careers, this seminar should act as a real resource for ideas in how to tackle this daunting process. For those who contribute with their own ideas and processes for lesson planning using a variety of styles, I hope that this opportunity to put down in words what they do helps in the ongoing process of personal development that continues throughout our careers. And for those who choose to read the seminar but not contribute, I hope that the ideas that will be expressed are both usefully new and inspiring, or simply reassuring when you find that others do the same things that you do when creating lessons.
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

#2 Lesley Ann

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Posted 14 May 2003 - 09:56 PM

Teaching and Learning Strategies

My philosophy: The schemes of work and lessons that are produced should demonstrate a very wide range of teaching and learning strategies. With the top priority being effective teaching and active learning. Present history topics in lively and interesting ways to motivate and stimulate the pupils. Using a variety of teaching styles to breath life into the teaching of history for example, thinking skills, brain based learning, accelerated learning. Provide pupils with challenges by setting high standards, structure lessons with engaging, stimulating and motivating activities. Introduce pupils to a wide range of resources. Share good practice amongst your dept. Encourage pupils to become articulate, especially through group discussion, and challenge them in the use of source work. Perhaps the greatest incentive for providing such a varied diet is that it is more fun to teach and to learn in this way. Above all doing History should be fun.

Planning a lesson:
I plan my lessons much the same way as Stephen. The starting point of the lesson ‘the question for the lesson’ – what do I want to pupils to learn? How do I want the pupils to learn? By what process will the pupils learn? What questions will this topic raise? At the end of the lesson what will the pupils have learned?
Resources: I gather many resources, textbooks, Internet to see how it has been approached in the past, how can I improve.

Learning styles: What learning style will I use? Visual, Auditory, Kinaesthetic? To broaden this out further I use the multiple intelligences as a way of addressing the variety of learners that are in any class.
Here is a quick guide to using the multiple intelligences for those who are unsure:

The interpersonal intelligence is the ability to understand and work with others. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Working in groups.
· Problem solving.
· Listening to the views of others.

The intrapersonal intelligence has to do with the ability to understand oneself and to access your own feelings and emotions, to judge and make sense of them and to act on your judgements. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Set yourself personal goals and targets.
· Monitor your goals and targets.
· Keep diaries or learning logs.
· Talk about moral and ethical issues.
· Try to be more assertive.

Linguistic intelligence includes an understanding to the meaning of words, to their order, to the sounds, rhythm and the variety of words and their ability to change moods or get across information. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Use poetry and rhymes.
· Play on words.
· Read more.
· Discussion work.
· Listen.
· Puzzles and anagrams.
· Written and speaking exercises.
· Build up key words.

Mathematical and logical intelligence or problem-solvers. They look for sequence, logic and order. They can tell the difference between patterns. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Try sequencing activities. Pattern games e.g. Dingbats.
· Work with numbers, measurement and estimation.
· Problem-solving activities.
· Brainstorm information before ordering and organising it.

Visual and spatial intelligence means these learners build pictures of what they have seen in their mind. They learn by seeing and observing. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Topic webs.
· Memory maps.
· Visualise.

Kinesthetic intelligence. The ability to use one’s body in highly skilled ways. Kinesthetic learners learn best by doing. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Try drama, role-play, and physical movement.
· Field trips, visits, design and make activities.
· Involve yourself in extra-curricular sporting activities.

People with a musical intelligence are constantly aware of tones, rhythms and music. Composers constantly work and re-work such patterns. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Learn by using raps, rhymes, songs, jingles, and singing.
· Dramatic readings.
· Use music to help with revision.

Those with the naturalist intelligence are at home in the natural environment. They can describe the features of the natural environment and name different species of birds, plants and animals. These techniques work best to assess this intelligence:
· Environmental projects.
· Be responsible for your own environment.
· Nature walks.
· Field trips to places of environmental interest.

Teaching methods
To transfer enthusiasm for History a rich variety of teaching methods and styles should be used.
· whole class teaching,
· group work,
· paired work,
· independent project work,
· thinking skills,
· accelerated learning techniques,
· presentations,
· ICT,
· ‘hot seating’,
· music and drama,
· role play
· empathetic reconstruction
· art and craftwork,
· audio-visual,
· display work,
· research,
· field trips,
· effective use of textbooks.

Above all make lessons different.Make an impact on the children that you teach. The pupils NEVER come back in 10 years time and say ‘Sir,Miss….remember that cool worksheet you did!’ (erm death by a million worksheets) BUT THEY DO remember the trench warfare reconstruction they acted out in the classroom!!!
:teacher:

Edited by Ann, 14 May 2003 - 09:58 PM.

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#3 Richard Drew

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Posted 15 May 2003 - 05:35 AM

I think that the real difficulty in achieving learning through a variety of learning methods is this:

We aim to vary our teaching from lesson to lesson to ensure variety and that we catch all intelligences; however in a carefully planned enquiry each lesson has a different learning outcome that builds upon the last lesson.

So how to ensure that large numbers of pupils are not left behind each lesson, and are unable to make connections with prior learning. to achieve this we need a variety of learning styles to be catered for in each lesson, but without avoiding too much repetition, or too much chaos in the classroom as pupils undertake different activities.

How can we catch all pupils in all lessons, not just hit each base every few lessons?
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#4 Dafydd Humphreys

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Posted 15 May 2003 - 05:58 AM

How can we catch all pupils in all lessons, not just hit each base every few lessons?

I think we sometimes underestimate students' abilities to pick up at least one or two new concepts/ideas/keywords in a lesson. There are certainly different types of learners which necessitate a broad variety of teaching styles across a unit of study, but I believe that even if a certain pupil's mind doesn't 'click' with one style, the experience of it regularly, and not just as a one-off, will get the pupil used to the range of teaching methods.

They key is to get them early. I had an interesting conversation with the most recent OFSTED inspector at our place. She knocked my two KS4 lessons down a grade (to very good rather than excellent :whistle: ) because the students were too docile and quiet. However my y9 and y7 students were more confident and much more eager to discuss and ask challenging questions. There is a problem with the older students in that after becoming Kevin and Perries (teenagers to non-UK readers!) they are more likely to be too embarrassed to contribute in front of their peers. I certainly remember myself as a student and how it was considered the height of 'uncool' to look like you were actively learning in class once you hit year nine and beyond, until sixth form when you could actively debate again.

Is this a problem that others have encountered in other types of schools? I teach in a boys 11-16 environment, in a not very salubrious area. I would be interested in reading how different approaches to teaching and learning styles have different degrees of success in co-ed, all-girls, and different socio-economic areas.
My Youtube Channels: <a href="http://www.youtube.c...m/Learnhistory" target="_blank">LearnHistory</a> (RIP) :( and <a href="http://www.youtube.c.../Learnhistory2" target="_blank">LearnHistory2</a> and now <a href="http://www.youtube.c.../Learnhistory3" target="_blank">LearnHistory3</a>

#5 John Simkin

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Posted 15 May 2003 - 06:11 AM

Teaching and learning in the modern classroom has so many recognised facets that it is surely impossible not to wish to be innovative and experimental in your approach as a teacher.

I have yet to meet any teachers who have even asserted a belief in the use of a single learning style for their classroom.


As a History teacher I always seek to communicate with the other teachers in my school who deliver other subjects. Every subject has something to offer in the development of lessons.

The other key source of information that I use when developing lessons is feedback from students.

“Teaching and learning in the modern classroom has so many recognised facets that it is surely impossible not to wish to be innovative and experimental in your approach as a teacher.”

I do not share your view that teachers desire to be “innovative and experimental”. Although I suspect it is true for most members of the forum. However, they have joined the forum because they are interested in new ideas. I don’t think most teachers fall into this category.

There are deep psychological reasons why teachers prefer to use a few trusted strategies in the classroom. Early in their career teachers develop strategies that they become convinced work for them. This gives them a sense of security and are therefore reluctant to dramatically change these strategies.

I have been involved in delivering INSET for over 20 years. This has included the use of computers, active learning and simulations in the classroom. I was also involved in preparing teachers for GCSE and the National Curriculum. In all these cases teachers approached these changes with great trepidation. Each one involved them reassessing the strategies they used in the classroom. Understandably, they found this a painful experience.

“I have yet to meet any teachers who have even asserted a belief in the use of a single learning style for their classroom.”

Teachers would not admit to this but I have met and observed teachers who have used only a limited range of approaches.

Every year the chief HMI for history used to write a report on the teaching of history. Ofsted have continued this and these documents are well worth reading. The message is always the same, teachers are too dependent on the history textbook. This problem has increased since the introduction of the National Curriculum and Ofsted inspections. The general feeling has been: “how can I get it wrong if I use a textbook that has been produced to deliver the National Curriculum?”

The emergence of the worksheet in the 1970s took place as a result of teachers attempting to liberate themselves from the textbook. The development of technology (the production of relatively inexpensive full-colour, well-illustrated books) and the introduction of the National Curriculum has made teachers even more dependent on the textbook. However, I think it is important to say at this point we are fortunate in this country that we do have several textbook authors (and commissioning editors) who are “innovative and experimental”.

The important issue concerns how we encourage teachers to be more “innovative and experimental”. In the past the HMI, the LEA history adviser and the provision of INSET played an important role in this. However, as predicted when Ofsted was introduced, we have seen a rapid decline in the numbers of history advisers. Over the last few days several teachers have remarked on the forum that they are finding it more and more difficult to attend external INSET sessions. Some of the younger teachers have said they have never been allowed to attend external INSET.

“The other key source of information that I use when developing lessons is feedback from students.”

This approach of information is often limited to receiving negative feedback from students. Teachers therefore discover what the students do not like but do not receive enough information about what works for them.

For the first three years of my teaching career I was also involved in doing a research degree. This involved me interviewing the students about their experiences in the classroom. I found this extremely helpful and even after my research had been completed I continued to find time to discuss these issues with my students. Of course you have to balance what the student wants and what you as a teacher needs to deliver, but it is vitally important to get these insights into the educational process.

A few years ago my Y12 sociology group carried out research into students experience of GCSE teaching. This involved carrying out in-depth interviews with most of their own year group who had just completed their GCSE exams. The students also had to rank the quality of teaching they received in the different subjects on a 10 point scale. By looking at the exam results and these rankings we discovered there was a close correlation between these two factors.

One of the many things that came out of this was the limited range of teaching strategies employed by the teachers. So many of the students complained that virtually every lesson was the same. It appeared from this research that the dictation of notes is still common in the classroom. The involvement of these students in these lessons was minimal. Overall the exam results in the school were very good when compared to the national statistics. However, the main reason for this was the student intake (have you noticed how you never seem to get failing schools in middle class areas). The school was also protected by the fact that the same was happening all over the country. What was clear was that certain departments were dramatically underachieving and teaching methods were playing a vital role in this.

#6 Richard Drew

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Posted 15 May 2003 - 06:25 AM

“The other key source of information that I use when developing lessons is feedback from students.”

This approach of information is often limited to receiving negative feedback from students. Teachers therefore discover what the students do not like but do not receive enough information about what works for them.

i'm afraid i would have to entirely disagree with this idea.

in my experience students' feedback is an absolutely vital ingredient in lesson preparation. pupils are not as naive about how they learn and what makes good teaching as that.

getting the approach correct is all that matters, the correcxt environment, the correct questions and ensuring the pupils know what you mean by your questions is vital.

pupils know a good teacher, they know a good lesson, they know a good activity and they know whether something has engaged them and taught them. this is as much positive as negative.

pupils are easily capable of recalling a lesson where they learned a great deal, really understood the concepts and skills taught AND why, after all it is their learning.

we as cxonsumers know when and why we have received good service or help, and i am very sure that pupils see enough poor teaching and learning to spot good teaching and learning and know why it is different.
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#7 John Simkin

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Posted 15 May 2003 - 07:46 AM

This approach of information is often limited to receiving negative feedback from students. Teachers therefore discover what the students do not like but do not receive enough information about what works for them.

i'm afraid i would have to entirely disagree with this idea. in my experience students' feedback is an absolutely vital ingredient in lesson preparation. pupils are not as naive about how they learn and what makes good teaching as that. (Richard Drew)


You seem to have completely missed my point. I was describing the way that teachers often get feedback from their students. I then go on to give several examples of how this could be done. A lot of these you then repeat. What then are you disagreeing with me about?

Edited by John Simkin, 15 May 2003 - 07:49 AM.


#8 Richard Drew

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Posted 15 May 2003 - 10:07 AM

This approach of information is often limited to receiving negative feedback from students. Teachers therefore discover what the students do not like but do not receive enough information about what works for them.

i'm afraid i would have to entirely disagree with this idea. in my experience students' feedback is an absolutely vital ingredient in lesson preparation. pupils are not as naive about how they learn and what makes good teaching as that. (Richard Drew)


You seem to have completely missed my point. I was describing the way that teachers often get feedback from their students. I then go on to give several examples of how this could be done. A lot of these you then repeat. What then are you disagreeing with me about?

sorry, john. i was not fully awake at that moment clearly. i thought you were implying that only high level sociological research could identify these problems.

obviously this was not your intention.

i totally agree with your point that much current practice is so superficial and spurious that it only detects minor negatives.
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#9 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 15 May 2003 - 11:59 AM

So how to ensure that large numbers of pupils are not left behind each lesson, and are unable to make connections with prior learning. to achieve this we need a variety of learning styles to be catered for in each lesson, but without avoiding too much repetition, or too much chaos in the classroom as pupils undertake different activities.

How can we catch all pupils in all lessons, not just hit each base every few lessons?

That really is the crux of the matter, ensuring that as many learning styles as possible are catered for in every lesson. I doubt very much whether anyone does manage to achieve total coverage on a week in week out basis but do think that the problem can be minimised.

Take the 'model lesson' from the TLF strand for example. Your starter activity can be a .ppt, incorporating music, video and a range of drag and drop type tasks - catering for a number of types of learners.

The main section of the lesson will more often than not include use of texts but can be manipulated to include breaks that involve presentation, debate or rolepay - depending on the nature of the tasks being completed. Not only providing an opportunity for the teacher to double check progress but allowing students who prefer to get up and act things out / talk things through, an opportunity, however brief, to make use of their preferred style of learning.

If the plenary then provides a challenge in the form of a game, puzzle or problem solving exercise, alogn with a little Q&A most learning styles have been catered for. The lesson would have been pacey, engaging - assuming delivery is good - and appealing to students with most learning styles. If these methods are then mixed up over the course of a scheme of work, making use of the many other methods available, such as the many listed previously by Anne, you'll have a scheme that does cater very effectively for all.

There is of course the option of having different groups within a class performing different types of task. Differentiation by preferred learning style is not impossible. Once a general task has been explained there's nothing to stop a group working with the teacher in a totally different way, support assistant are often deployed in this manner with lower attainers and it's a practice that our colleagues in primary education appear to be very used to. This methjod is also a very easy way of differentiating for the gifted and talented students within a group.

The problem with all of that? It requires a lot of planning, a lot of experimentation and a lot of energy. More than anything it requires very good classroom management and a desire to work in this way - a point which John has already elaborated on.

#10 Carole Faithorn

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Posted 16 May 2003 - 12:54 AM

Is this a problem that others have encountered in other types of schools? I teach in a boys 11-16 environment, in a not very salubrious area. I would be interested in reading how different approaches to teaching and learning styles have different degrees of success in co-ed, all-girls, and different socio-economic areas.

Just to pick up te question Dafydd raised here.

I have taught in a variety of schools during my career: maintained and independent, single-sex and co-ed, in the UK and abroad. None has been highly selective. I was lucky enough to do my PGCE in an innovative dept. when 'pupil-centred learning' was not a dirty phrase. So although I don't think we'd ever heard of different learning styles back in the mid '60s the way I was trained and the school where I was fortunate enough to do my teaching practice both encouraged us to experiment with a wide variety of teaching styles.

Things have changed a great deal over the years, but one constant has been the reluctance of 14-16 year olds (primarily boys) to engage actively in learning, or at least to do it obviously. (I reckon it's something to do with their hormones B) )

What I have observed is that the socio-economic background doesn't appear to be a significant influence. I currently teach at an all-boys, 11-18 independent school almost certainly at the opposite end of the social scale to Dafydd's and it's the Year 10s and 11s who are the most passive and the least prepared to appear 'uncool'.

Interestingly, and more recently, the boys who are most responsive to different strategies are the ones with SENs. I suspect this is because in recent years a SEN teacher has worked with them to identify their dominant Learning Styles so that they are more aware of what suits them best.

Clearly a lesson to be learned there.

#11 Lesley Ann

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Posted 16 May 2003 - 09:51 AM

Interestingly, and more recently, the boys who are most responsive to different strategies are the ones with SENs. I suspect this is because in recent years a SEN teacher has worked with them to identify their dominant Learning Styles so that they are more aware of what suits them best.

Clearly a lesson to be learned there.


just to pick up on your point Carole of pupils knowing their own learning styles! I took Howard Gardner's model and simplified the questions he uses to identify your preferred multiple intelligences, to give to students so they were able to understand how best they learned....in my previous school I took it through a year group, it was well received and once the children knew how best they learned they also targeted the intelligences that they were not developed in and had ago at some of the techniques I mentioned earlier in this seminar.

It is very important that the learners understand how they learn. As they grow and develop towards AS level students will be more aware of how best they learn from experience in the education system, but a younger child will not be mature enough to pin point how they learn best...so that is why I simplified the questions....

Edited by Ann, 16 May 2003 - 09:53 AM.

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#12 Richard Drew

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Posted 17 May 2003 - 10:24 AM

Teaching methods
To transfer enthusiasm for History a rich variety of teaching methods and styles should be used. 
· whole class teaching,
· group work,
· paired work,
· independent project work,
· thinking skills,
· accelerated learning techniques,
· presentations,
· ICT,
· ‘hot seating’,
· music and drama,
· role play
· empathetic reconstruction
· art and craftwork,
· audio-visual,
· display work,
· research,
· field trips,
· effective use of textbooks.

and the key here, as you say, is to regard these as teaching methods.

i think too many teachers regard these as activities connected to the teaching, not the teaching itself. many pupils simply do not learn through being told, and too many teachers tell pupils the learning, give them an activity connected to it, and then tell them what they have just learned in that activity.

good teachers liberate themselves from a 'control freak' attitude to the learning (- pupils can learn independently of our voices), and allow the pupils to learn through the varied learning activities, and then use a good questioning technique to tease out the key learning issues from the activity.

of course, the real issue here is that mot of the actual 'teaching' takes place at the planning stage, and unlike members of this forum, there are teachers out there who do not want to put the effort in at this point
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#13 Richard Jones-Nerzic

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Posted 17 May 2003 - 12:02 PM

I took Howard Gardner's model and simplified the questions he uses to identify your preferred multiple intelligences, to give to students so they were able to understand how best they learned....

I did the same thing with older students. I gave them a Gardner style questionnaire and then as a class we analysed the data. In addition to your observations, I think the exercise was also useful in highlighting for the students that others in the class may learn differently from themselves. There are always students who dislike some forms of learning. I found the questionnaire activity helped me justify activities that did not resemble the terminal exam we were working towards.

I haven't done this activity for a few years but I think I'll do it again in September. Thanks for reminding me about it.
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#14 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 17 May 2003 - 12:34 PM

What do you do with the findings of these questionairres? I've often asked students in general terms about their learning styles but haven't ever formalised it.

As an example, I've had a go at the online learning styles questionairre that can be found here.

The results show that my preferred learning style is:

Well balanced between Active and reflective.
Far more intuitive than sensing.
Far more visual than verbal.
Slightly more global than sequential.

Now apart from being extremly dubious about some of these 'findings', I'm not 100% sure what I'd have to do given 30 sets of these from a class. Is the intenetion simply to double check that you're catering for all of the learning styles within the class or is there a more detailed analysis that goes alongside the findings?

What I did find interesting was ccomparing the way I prefer to learn with my preferred method of teaching - which I'd assumed would match but, if the above findings about my preferred style of learning is correct, clearly don't.

#15 Richard Jones-Nerzic

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Posted 17 May 2003 - 05:39 PM

What I did find interesting was ccomparing the way I prefer to learn with my preferred method of teaching - which I'd assumed would match but, if the above findings about my preferred style of learning is correct, clearly don't.

This is interesting.

Advocates of multiple intelligence learning in history will argue that history teachers are probably linguistic learners themselves. Most (history) teachers will lecture and expect students to read a lot and take notes. This is how they learnt - they were successful learners - therefore, this is how others will learn. This was the implied criticism in John Simkin's seminar.

I became a strong linguistic learner but I wasn't in school. I wonder how many teachers who are sensitive to the need for variety in lessons were not particularly good students in a traditional learning environment?

On the questionaire, I admit I did nothing with it after the lesson. The point was the lesson. I wanted students to become sensitive to the needs of other learners and also to be more open minded about ways of learning. It was the first lesson in a new school, with 16 students from a range of nationalities and learning experiences.

As I said before though, I think I'll do it again.

As for multiple intelligences: we are a one form entry, non-selective multilingual, multinational school. I just assume every class has it all :)
All that is necessary for the forces of evil to win in the world is for enough good men to do nothing.
Edmund Burke


European School Brussels III
International School History




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