Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

History Library Lesson


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 Jeremy H

Jeremy H

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 158 posts

Posted 23 March 2012 - 02:28 PM

Dear clever History teachers

I am hoping there is somebody out there who might be able to help with this.

I am looking at introducing good old fashioned library lessons to my students. The plan is to start with Year 7 by setting them a independent research project (into the Renaissance) - for which the aims will be twofold:

1. To investigate their aspect/ individual from the Renaissance (of course)
2. To teach them how to become more informationally literate - i.e how to use books, library, the internet and other learning resources to greater effect

Before I embark upon re-inventing the wheel I wondered if there was anybody out there who had done something similar and could perhaps point me in the right direction?

Many thanks in advance
Jeremy

#2 Jenjane

Jenjane

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 477 posts

Posted 27 March 2012 - 04:46 PM

Dear clever History teachers

I am hoping there is somebody out there who might be able to help with this.

I am looking at introducing good old fashioned library lessons to my students. The plan is to start with Year 7 by setting them a independent research project (into the Renaissance) - for which the aims will be twofold:

1. To investigate their aspect/ individual from the Renaissance (of course)
2. To teach them how to become more informationally literate - i.e how to use books, library, the internet and other learning resources to greater effect

Before I embark upon re-inventing the wheel I wondered if there was anybody out there who had done something similar and could perhaps point me in the right direction?

Many thanks in advance
Jeremy


Hi we do long term homeworks with KS3 and every one has an element of research (see doc. for y7 research hwk and the ppt has the individual questions). I always start with the basics.
Put a textbook on the table and get them to find the page with the black death on it, for example. Very easy to tell then what their skills are eg flicking though the book, index, contents etc and work from there. Also, show them examples where they have to think around the topic to get what they want eg a book entitled the Medieval Era probably will have something on homes but you might need to look under castles, furniture, towns etc. I have found it most accessible for the year 7's to have questions to answer, 8s areas of focus to cover and we give the year 9s complete freedom: research what they want from WW2.
And the one thing that is hardest to teach: books are better than the internet. Have a race: who can find out x the fastest?
Encyclopaedias are a good starting place if you know nothing about a topic.
Also: copy and paste is not research. The best way that I got it across to my students was the word 'copy' from copy and paste. They know that 'copying' someone's work in class is wrong, so why is it acceptable from the internet? It isn't. And through the medium of Google the teacher can catch you out very swiftly...
If they must use the internet, give them a suggested list of websites.
Make them do a bibliography with 5 books on it.
Make them do a log of what they have found out so you can see progress.

Also, make friends with the librarian and show them what the kids will be asking for, if they can prepare a book box / area of the library for the books half the battle is won.

The students will only get better though at research the more often that they do it, and realistically at KS3, that's just in the Humanities subjects on a regular basis.
Jane

Attached Files






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users