Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Titantic


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 kevin E

kevin E

    New member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts

Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:53 PM

Hi all,

Following a discussion with my HOD, he is keen to undertake a unit of study of the Titantic. I have had some ideas and begun planning a series of lessons but would really appreciate some input from fellow colleagues. My HOD will be pressing me for plans etc before Easter!

Thanks

#2 Dave Wallbanks

Dave Wallbanks

    Super Member

  • Admin
  • 1,446 posts

Posted 28 March 2012 - 09:50 PM

http://historyonthen...titanicmain.htm

This is the best place to start out. I use most of the resources from here. We also watch the programme "Seconds from disaster - The Titanic". Our assessment is "Whose fault was the sinking of the Titanic?" but this also includes "Why were so many killed on the Titanic?" We generally let students present their findings in any way they choose and have had some excellent films, powerpoints, posters etc etc... I've got model Titanics on my wall, posters all over the place and for homeworks my students researched and designed their own titanic menus, researched the lives of the people on the ship and their fates, used old newspapers to find out about the ship (The Mirror said most people had survived in its' first editions etc). Hope this is of some use.
There is a light and it never goes out.
Go pray in my church!
http://www.nufc.com

#3 Tom Morton

Tom Morton

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:59 PM

The Begbie Contest at this link features an essay section with eleven well chosen documents and this question:

Explain why the unthinkable happened to what many considered to be an unsinkable vessel.

You have to scroll down aways to Section 3 to find it.

Edited by Tom Morton, 28 March 2012 - 11:00 PM.


#4 Ed Podesta

Ed Podesta

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 499 posts

Posted 29 March 2012 - 04:38 AM

How about a social history. Does the Titanic help us to understand how different types of people lived?

"In the past, philosophers have sought only to understand the world. The point is also to change it." - K. Marx
"Classification is exceedingly tedious" - I. Berlin

 

ModernWorldGcseHistory.1.gif

 

OneDamnThing.1.gif

 

Podestaorguk.1.gif

 


#5 Mark H.

Mark H.

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 961 posts

Posted 29 March 2012 - 05:04 AM

The new Titanic section on the National Archives website is brilliant. It includes a searchable passenger list so that you can identify local people. It also has lots of detailed articles on people involved in the tragedy including fascinating stories like Violet Jessop who survived the sinking of both the Titanic and its sister ship Britannic (and was on the third, Olympic, when it hit a Royal Navy ship in the Solent). We have had pupils researching local links-for example the strange coincidence that both the hero of the hour, Captain Arthur Rostron of the Carpathia and the vilified Captain Stanley Lord of the Californian came from Bolton in Lancashire, hardly one of Britain's major seafaring towns.

Edited by Mark H., 29 March 2012 - 05:47 AM.

In memory of my boyhood hero Jim Clark (1936-1968): 'Chevalier Sans Peur et Sans Reproche'.

#6 Ed Waller

Ed Waller

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,502 posts

Posted 30 March 2012 - 06:00 AM

And if anyone can access Southampton, the new SeaCity museum with a focus on Titanic is well worth a visit. Have been as 'invited guest' as one of my former colleagues has pretty much designed it (and with learning in mind) and we piloted a Yr 9 visit, with excellent results.

Just a thought... if you are within travelling distance (arr 10 leave at 2...)
A child of five would understand this. Send someone to fetch a child of five. - Groucho Marx

#7 Chouan

Chouan

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 30 March 2012 - 07:52 AM

The new Titanic section on the National Archives website is brilliant. It includes a searchable passenger list so that you can identify local people. It also has lots of detailed articles on people involved in the tragedy including fascinating stories like Violet Jessop who survived the sinking of both the Titanic and its sister ship Britannic (and was on the third, Olympic, when it hit a Royal Navy ship in the Solent). We have had pupils researching local links-for example the strange coincidence that both the hero of the hour, Captain Arthur Rostron of the Carpathia and the vilified Captain Stanley Lord of the Californian came from Bolton in Lancashire, hardly one of Britain's major seafaring towns.


Yet it shouldn't be a surprise, Britain's seafarers, apart from fishermen, were never limited to the coast. Most Merchant Navy Officers are from "the land" rather than "the coast". Marine Engineers tended, historically, to have been from places where shipbuilding was important, as they served their time as Marine Engine fitters in shipyards before going to sea, but the Deck Officers came from everywhere. Indeed, in the house where I live in rural Cambridgeshire a Master Mariner was once resident (in about 1900) and there is a Mate buried in the cemetery 100 yards along the road.

Edited by Chouan, 08 April 2012 - 11:41 AM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users