Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

AQA Britain at War C/W 2013 (War at Sea)


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 Simon Heslop

Simon Heslop

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 10:17 AM

Hello, I'm about to start putting together sources for the AQA Coursework Q.2. for 2013. The task is:
‘The War at Sea was much more important and threatening for Britain in the Second World War than it
was in the First World War.’
How far do the sources you have used support this interpretation of the War at Sea in both World
Wars?
To answer this question, examine the sources you have researched on this topic. You should examine
at least 8 sources in explaining your answer.

The War at Sea is not a topic I've covered in any depth in the past. Does anyone have any links/sources/dvd-video resources they could recommend?

#2 Chouan

Chouan

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 11:44 AM

The BBC had a couple film about it. Try "the Battle of the Atlantic" and "Forgotten Heroes" from the Timewatch series. For cinema films, try "Western Approaches" http://www.amazon.co...37859820&sr=1-1
"San Demetrio, London" http://www.amazon.co...37859861&sr=1-1
"Sink the Bismark" and "The Battle of the River Plate", and, for curiosity value, "Convoy" http://www.amazon.co...859759&sr=1-19.
For books, try these (Amazon links for ease)
http://www.amazon.co...37859304&sr=1-4
http://www.amazon.co...37859304&sr=1-5
http://www.amazon.co...7859384&sr=1-13
http://www.amazon.co...37859480&sr=1-1
and for novels, http://www.amazon.co...7859523&sr=1-10 and http://www.amazon.co...7859582&sr=1-32 for a flavour of the experience.

Edited by Chouan, 24 May 2012 - 11:45 AM.


#3 Simon Heslop

Simon Heslop

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 12:35 PM

Thanks for those. I hadn't heard of 'Western Approaches' before.

#4 Chouan

Chouan

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 01:58 PM

These are all about WW2, however. There is very little about the wider War at Sea in WW1. Most books are focused on Jutland, Coronel, the Falklands and the Dardanelles, with even less on how close Britain was to starvation because of the U Boat campaign.

#5 Simon Heslop

Simon Heslop

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 03:02 PM

I have got the 'War at sea' programme from the Hew Strachan 'First World War' series (2004)which gives a good overview of Jutland and the U Boat campaign. There's also an interesting bit about the U boat sent to the US early in the war.

#6 Mark H.

Mark H.

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 943 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 04:28 PM

There is a good article on the U-Boat menace in the Great War in the June 2012 issue of 'Military History Monthly' (£3.95). It's one of those specialist magazines that can be a little difficult to track down but our local W.H. Smith's usually has copies. There are some useful photos, poster reproductions etc.
In memory of my boyhood hero Jim Clark (1936-1968): 'Chevalier Sans Peur et Sans Reproche'.

#7 ChrisHarbron

ChrisHarbron

    New member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 24 May 2012 - 06:29 PM

I'm doing this same question with my Y10s at the moment - if it's of any use at all, here are the sources I'm using. Hopefully it might give you a couple of ideas.

I've been encouraging my lot to think thematically and break down 'the war at sea' into different aspects, e.g. u-boats, battleships, battles, blockades and impact on rationing etc. Then they can assess which aspects of the threat from the sea were most significant to Britain, and compare them in the two wars. This way hopefully they can demonstrate the kind of analytical thinking and reasoning needed for the L4 judgement. So far their research seems to be going quite well.

Attached Files



#8 Mark H.

Mark H.

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 943 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 09:13 AM

We used to do the Battle of the Atlantic as psrt of our coursework on the old Specification. I've mentioned it before, but if you're within striking distance of Liverpool, visits to the Merseyside Maritime Museum exhibition on the battle, the 'Western Approaches' Underground HQ at Derby House and the superb, preserved U-534 at Birkenhead ferry terminal are WELL worth making. We did it as a GCSE Study Day with a trip on the Mersey ferry thrown in.
In memory of my boyhood hero Jim Clark (1936-1968): 'Chevalier Sans Peur et Sans Reproche'.

#9 Chouan

Chouan

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 09:51 AM

I'm doing this same question with my Y10s at the moment - if it's of any use at all, here are the sources I'm using. Hopefully it might give you a couple of ideas.

I've been encouraging my lot to think thematically and break down 'the war at sea' into different aspects, e.g. u-boats, battleships, battles, blockades and impact on rationing etc. Then they can assess which aspects of the threat from the sea were most significant to Britain, and compare them in the two wars. This way hopefully they can demonstrate the kind of analytical thinking and reasoning needed for the L4 judgement. So far their research seems to be going quite well.


Wonderful that you've shown the memorial at Hartlepool. My family are from there and my grandfather was a gunner in the Heugh Battery on the day of the bombardment.

#10 Tony Fox

Tony Fox

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,294 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 12:22 PM

Bombardment: The Day the East Coast Bled
This is well worth a look, although I felt it focussed too much on Scarborough, but I am biased in favour of Hartlepool, where there is a wealth of good information.

I am currently re-reading Castles of Steel: Britain, Germany, and the Winning of the Great War at Sea
"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr

#11 Simon Heslop

Simon Heslop

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 35 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 01:40 PM

Thanks for the suggestions. I also found some sources that could be useful on the Public Records Office website on the Battle of the Atlantic. It's such a broad topic, covering both wars, it's narrowing down the selection that'll be the challenge.
I'm not far from Hartlepool, but I haven't been to see the memorial at the headland. There are some remnants from the Second World War at South Gare. A few years ago, I dived on the wreck of a mine sweeper off there. If you're interested in local history, the 'Hidden Teeside' website is excellent:

http://www.hidden-teesside.co.uk/

#12 Chouan

Chouan

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 01:49 PM

The Heugh Battery still exists, although in " Heritage Theme Park" style. http://www.heughbattery.com/ A far cry from the neglected original that my grandfather used to take me around when I was a child. He could even show me exactly where he stood whilst manning a 6" gun. How many people can be shown the exact spot where their parent or grandparent fought in a world war? Powerful stuff.

#13 Tony Fox

Tony Fox

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,294 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 02:15 PM

The Heugh Battery still exists, although in " Heritage Theme Park" style. http://www.heughbattery.com/ A far cry from the neglected original that my grandfather used to take me around when I was a child. He could even show me exactly where he stood whilst manning a 6" gun. How many people can be shown the exact spot where their parent or grandparent fought in a world war? Powerful stuff.


The group have put a lot of work into this and have come close a few times to winning substantial funding, the work they have done with the limited funding is remarkable, I have taken students a number of times and found the re-enactors and guides most helpful, looking forward to the centenary
"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr

#14 Chouan

Chouan

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 683 posts

Posted 28 May 2012 - 07:22 AM

Heritage theme park is obviously better than the place being demolished, as seemed likely in the 1970's. Along the promenade to the north, overlooking the sea, near the town moor, is a large open area with terracing. On the concrete surface were two indentations where a dud German 11" shell had bounced. In the late 60's early 70's the whole area was resurfaced and thus no trace of this remains, despite it being well known at the time.

#15 Tony Fox

Tony Fox

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,294 posts

Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:18 AM

http://www.uboat.net/

Almost forgot to suggest this, a site I have used for over ten years now, and Gudmundur is always willing to help.
"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users