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#16 Richard Jones-Nerzic

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Posted 02 June 2006 - 01:05 PM

Just had a quick look through, seems to be very much improved. Some good work by Helen James in Swansea/Cardiff I guess. :)

Paper 1 prescribed are more attractive. Collapse of communism will fit well with Mao and Cold War. Having started to focus on the end of the Cold War in 2005 this suits me well.

Paper 2 is not significantly changed is it?

Paper 3 is potentially the biggest improvement. Three topics with multiple questions on each, has got to be an improvement on the lottery that is currently Paper 3. I particularly like option 12 on the modern Europe option (5). This allows us to (really) do something other than political history for the first time. However, we may even go medieval! IST history is just a little tempted.
All that is necessary for the forces of evil to win in the world is for enough good men to do nothing.
Edmund Burke


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#17 mikel

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 12:36 PM

My main concern with Paper 3 is that the review proposes that students study three topics. The topics are really pretty broad, but each topic will get only two questions in the exam. This will mean that students have a choice of three out of six questions. That does seem a bit of a lottery as well. I also remain unconvinced by the decision to merge Europe and the Middle East.

I agree that the paper 1 proposals are greatly improved. My Middle Eastern contacts tell me that the Middle East conflict topic might be a bit unmanageable, but I don't think we'd have gone for that anyway. The decline and fall of communism topic is also much broader than previous topics, but that might not be a bad thing.

I really would encourage all IB history teachers to visit the OCC website and vote in the poll which Andy Dailey has put up on the forum about the proposals. If we want our voice to be heard by the powers that be, we need to participate...
Mike Tribe

#18 Richard Jones-Nerzic

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 01:38 PM

My main concern with Paper 3 is that the review proposes that students study three topics. The topics are really pretty broad, but each topic will get only two questions in the exam. This will mean that students have a choice of three out of six questions. That does seem a bit of a lottery as well.

Are the proposed topics really any bigger than what we currently have with only one question? In fact some seem narrower or at least much better defined. I'd like to see each HL topic broken down into, say, five parts with the students guaranteed questions on three. I have already voted on the OCC (I was the second to do so! were you first?) but I'll try and add some comments after next week's e-Help conference...

Edited by Richard Jones-Nerzic, 11 January 2007 - 11:35 AM.

All that is necessary for the forces of evil to win in the world is for enough good men to do nothing.
Edmund Burke


European School Brussels III
International School History

#19 Laurence Hicks

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Posted 23 August 2006 - 07:48 AM

Here in Brunei, the Cold War 1960-1979 is our prescribed subject for Paper 1, and for Paper 2 we cover China and Germany plus the rest of the Cold War. In terms of Paper 3, we study the European option, starting with the Russian Revolution. The core texts that I use are Democracies and Dictatorships (Perspectives in History series published by Cambridge) and European History 1890-1990 (Years of Change series published by Hodder).
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#20 nforde

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Posted 07 October 2006 - 03:33 AM

Hello. In Hong Kong (West Island School) we are in the process of being authorised for the I.B Diploma programme- authorisation is in a couple of weeks time. We will start teaching in sept. 2007- and have the added problem of the syllabus changes for 2008. One of the major debates we have had is over which region to teach for higher level. If we opt for Asia then this means changing a lot of our work on China and Asia that is done throughout KS3 and KS4 (the emergence of Modern China and Vietnam are key parts of our EDEXCEL GCSE programme). Our hope is to base our course around the Cold War and Single Party States for paper 2 (hoping to develop comparative studies on Castro and Peron to balance out the European Dictators). How do you avoid the higher level Euorpe option becoming 100 years of Russia? The Curriculum Review seems to be trying to prevent that! We haven't ruled out offering higher level Asia option in the future- but there seem to be few really good student texts on Japan and Korea. Any comments from Asia option teachers?

#21 cathwar

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Posted 01 January 2007 - 02:40 PM

Our school is planning to start IB in September so a lot of planning is going on at the moment. I'd be interested in any help on offer for someone just starting out but particularly recommendations of resources. We have chosen "safe" options - Cold war for paper 1; one party states & warfare for paper 2; Europe for paper 3. We thought that it would be best to do content we're confident on while we get our heads around the demands of the exam but we would like to bring in some true international aspects - however, resources seem limited or am I not looking properly?

I'd welcome any advice - my school email address is warrc004@medway.gov.uk

Cathy Warren

#22 Russel Tarr

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Posted 24 January 2007 - 07:18 PM

Hi Cathy,

Have you taken a look at the site I'm working on at the moment - www.ibhistory.net? I've put a fair few resources on here including a curriculum grid giving you an idea of how you could structure a two year course teaching Higher / Standard Level students in the same class.

I've also put some generic markschemes for sourcework / essays on this week which you might find useful.

Resources on the topics of the Chinese Civil War will be getting added when I get round to teaching it in a few weeks...

"There's an old saying about those who forget history. I don't remember it, but it's good" - Stephen Colbert

#23 Jenjane

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 04:59 PM

Hi, just looking for a bit of advice.
I am joining a new school this term and they have just started teaching the IB, so although v.supportive with everything else, this is a mystery to them too!
I have figured out what we are doing for the topics and what I am (according to the SOW) supposed to be teaching this term, but after reading lots of stuff through I am a little confused (and brain not working very efficiently after Christmas break) about when I am supposed to teach the stuff from the 3 different papers, and the personal study bit. Theschemes of work I have are for p1 (Stalin and Russia) and p2 single party states and the cold war and they seem to be jolly chronological, but no time left for p3. So does this mean that you basically question spot for p3 and don't bother to teach this by itself, and the info I have from the INSET that the previous HoS left from the IBO suggested that you don't have to teach them as explicit units and do whatever you like, when you like.
Also, is there an essential difference between an IB essay and an A-level essay?
Thanks for any help
Jane
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#24 mikel

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 01:09 PM

Hi, Jane. Welcome to the IB...

Paper 1 is essentially about source interpretation. Students do require a good background knowledge of Stalin's Russia, but the sources chosen in the exam will be on one very specific topic -- 5-yr plans, purges, rise to power, or whatever. The questions always follow the same format: one question on literal comprehension, one question requiring students to "compare and contrast" two sources, one question asking students to assess the value and limitations of two of the sources based on their origins and purpose, and one "mini-essay" asking students to use material from the sources and their own knowledge.

Paper 2 is a traditional essay paper. Students answer two essays each chosen from a different section, in your case, one of the rise and rule of one-party states and one on the Cold War. The questions vary between quite specific questions on the topics specified in the curriculum, and more open-ended ones asking students to compare across regions. For this reason, it is important to study material from more than one region. So, for example, if you do Hitler and Stalin, you'll have to have a comparison from Asia, Africa or the Americas. Castro and Mao are popular choices.

Paper 3 is on a specific region. Students write three essays out of around 20. There's plenty of choice. The questions are much more specific than for paper 2. The IB recommends studying a period of 100 years. So, we do European history from 1789-1900.

Standard level students take papers 1 & 2 and do the internally-assessed Historical Investigation. Higher level students also take paper 3.

The very best way to prepare students for the exams is to use past papers. These are available from the IBO on CD roms and are invaluable. You should also take a look at the material available at the IB Online Curriculum Center. There's a useful teachers' forum there as well. Your IB Coordinator can set you up with a user name and password.

Having said all this, it all changes in September when the new curriculum starts! For heavens sake don't spend too much time preparing materials for topics which will either disappear altogether or be radically changed next year...

Don't hesitate to get in touch if I can help...

Happy New Year...
Mike Tribe

#25 Alick Brown

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:17 PM

I would add to Mike's excellent advice above, look at mark schemes (on the CD) when you are giving essay guidance.
But note the mark schemes for individual questions are more a support for examiners. To identify what level of writing gets high marks look at the generic mark schemes in the Guide [available from http://occ.ibo.org website] (make sure you are using the current one this year, and change in Sept. with any new group starting then).
And as Mike says the essay demands of Paper 2 & 3 are different.
"You don't have to teach them as explicit units and do whatever you like, when you like." - that's fine, but Paper 3 topics needs good preparation because the questions are specific.
Paper 1 shouldn't be a big problem for anyone who has done GCSE - focus on words of the question, mark schemes follow a formula.
Alick Brown

#26 Jenjane

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Posted 09 January 2008 - 09:32 AM

I would add to Mike's excellent advice above, look at mark schemes (on the CD) when you are giving essay guidance.
But note the mark schemes for individual questions are more a support for examiners. To identify what level of writing gets high marks look at the generic mark schemes in the Guide [available from http://occ.ibo.org website] (make sure you are using the current one this year, and change in Sept. with any new group starting then).
And as Mike says the essay demands of Paper 2 & 3 are different.
"You don't have to teach them as explicit units and do whatever you like, when you like." - that's fine, but Paper 3 topics needs good preparation because the questions are specific.
Paper 1 shouldn't be a big problem for anyone who has done GCSE - focus on words of the question, mark schemes follow a formula.

Thanks for both of your help that has been great, I now will filter through the piles in the cupboard looking for the CDs and ask for a password for the website. I'm sure that I'll be back soon though! (And I have also figured out what is on the p3- the other teacher who is teaching with me is doing that!!)
Jane

#27 Laurence Hicks

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Posted 12 January 2008 - 03:33 AM

One of the difficulties I had when I started IB teaching was how to manage the Paper 2 and Paper 3 topics for a mixed class of HL and SL students. Quite simply, it was difficult to decide much in advance if the SL students needed to be in the class because the content we covered was not all that likely to feature in a Paper 2 exam, but it would have been valuable in terms of context and broader subject knowledge.

The solution, or so it seems to me, is to take Mike's approach. That is, to study a separate period (or region) for the HL/Paper 3 students. This involves much more in the way of content coverage, but it also means that you can plan with a lot more confidence for the three exams. Furthermore, it means that you will always be fair to the students because it makes the difference between the HL and SL classes transparent and clear.
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#28 rachelloughery

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Posted 05 February 2008 - 11:31 PM

Hi everyone, I'm teaching at the British School of Costa Rica and have been here for 6 months. KS3 is mostly based on the English curriculum which is new to be as I'm from Northern Ireland. I have an IGCSE and IB class, both of which I'm excited but terrified of as I have not taught either before. At IB it is the usual courses and for paper 3 they can choose between Europe or the Americas as there are two teachers. I have taught AS and IB seems to be a completely different ball game. I will let you know how I get on and I will be scouring this site for hints and tips as to what I am supposed to be doing.

#29 Jenjane

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 07:57 AM

Hi,
Looking for advice about the investigation please! How long?when? what? argh! any tips on making life easier for the students as well, as it appears that all of their courseworks are due in at the same time here!!
Thanks
Jane

#30 Lou Phillips

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Posted 18 March 2008 - 08:37 AM

One of the difficulties I had when I started IB teaching was how to manage the Paper 2 and Paper 3 topics for a mixed class of HL and SL students. Quite simply, it was difficult to decide much in advance if the SL students needed to be in the class because the content we covered was not all that likely to feature in a Paper 2 exam, but it would have been valuable in terms of context and broader subject knowledge.

The solution, or so it seems to me, is to take Mike's approach. That is, to study a separate period (or region) for the HL/Paper 3 students. This involves much more in the way of content coverage, but it also means that you can plan with a lot more confidence for the three exams. Furthermore, it means that you will always be fair to the students because it makes the difference between the HL and SL classes transparent and clear.



I only just read this post, and its relief because thats what we are planning to do. I am teaching SL (Arab-Israeli Conflict for Paper 1, and wars and single party states for PAper 2) and my colleague is teaching HL history of the Americas. We thought it would be good for the students to get a wide range of knowledge and we do the America stuff for A-level anyway so saves on resources. I do think it means a lot more stuff to cover, but I think its more "in the spirit" of the IB too!
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