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Teaching and the Law


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#1 Guest_D. Tems_*

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 06:21 PM

I promise to put a little summary up about my first few weeks shortly but in the meantime, how are all you at different universities taught about 'teaching and the law'? We are having just three lectures of approx two hours length each. Oh and the exam for it is next Saturday! Does this strike a chord with anyone?

I can't really see (and have not been told about) any work I can do outside of the lesson to make me more likely to pass the exam. We're told it should just be common sense, once we've been introduced to the guidelines and guidance offered by various Government Acts and Circulars but there's a fair old bit to remember. I tried to look at some of the acts but they are humongous. Any suggestions?

:( Dave

And lets get posting, its stayed at a static 21 posts for ages!

#2 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 26 September 2003 - 06:37 PM

I promise to put a little summary up about my first few weeks shortly but in the meantime, how are all you at different universities taught about 'teaching and the law'?  We are having just three lectures of approx two hours length each.  Oh and the exam for it is next Saturday!  Does this strike a chord with anyone? 

We're told it should just be common sense, once we've been introduced to the guidelines and guidance offered by various Government Acts and Circulars but there's a fair old bit to remember.  I

Looking at all the different acts does make it all appear to be a bit too much. However, most of it IS common sense. The areas that aren't blindingly obvious include:

In loco parentis - basically this requires teachers to act in the way that a parent would do and places many of the responsibilities of a parent on your shoulders whilst the child is in your care. Essentially this means treat them fairly and if you think there's a problem with the way they are cared for or treated tell someone - in the case of a PGCE student, tell your supervising teacher, they will then pass on the concern to the relevant member of staff. Once you're qualified you SHOULD be told who to pass these concerns to.

SEN and Inclusions - new and fairly complex. In general the new laws on Inclusion mean that everyone within a group should be able to access all activities that students are asked to participate in. This is a requirement for you to differentiate activities for students with physical, behavioural and emotional needs. In practice this means that things such as 'Living Timelines' really aren't an option in a small classroom if you have a wheelchair in there, as the student who is wheelchair bound will be excluded from the activity. It also has implications for the planning of educational visits - how do you get an electric wheelchair onto the battlements of a castle???

Other sections may relate to the teachers contract etc. As this has just been revised the odds are that you will know as much, if not more, about it than established teachers. A quick search of any of the unions websites will illustrate the main changes and the new contractual obligations that a teacher is under.

There are more, these are but a few of the most important things for you to know. Your PGCE tutor and school supervisor will talk you through these in more detail.

#3 Chris Hammond

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Posted 07 October 2003 - 08:58 PM

There are given you an exam on the law of teaching as part of the PGCE. I have had quite a few small tests but I was wondering if this was something more serious. Hope it goes or went well: tell us how you got on!

Chris

#4 Guest_D. Tems_*

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Posted 08 October 2003 - 05:30 PM

I took the test last Saturday and I think it went well. We were given a set of case studies a couple of days before the exam and told that these were worth 60% and that we only needed 40% to pass. We couldn't take the case studies in with us but we had the time to study them and then were handed a fresh copy in the exam. They were fairly straight forward such as:

A boy is continually disrupting the lesson and after several attempts at getting him 'on task' you threaten him with detention. He gets very upset and says you are picking on him. He then tries to leave the classroom. You put your arm out to stop him.

We then had to briefly write about the legal issues and how the legal framework might be applied. There were abut six of these.

The second part was made up of fairly simple tick box questions like:

a parent being inconvenienced by a detention is a fair reason not to give a pupil one

Then there were some asking for definitions,

'in loco parentis'

and then there were some wanting examples of things, for example:

Give three things which might appear in a home school agreement OR

Name three situations when you are justified to use the minimum necessary physical force with a child


We had about an hour an a quarter and it wasn't difficult.

That said, we haven't got our marks back yet so I'll let you know! :woo:




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