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Ofsted Framework


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#1 JohnDClare

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 12:31 AM

(All readers of this thread please note that the framework grid discussed in this thread is now out of date and has been replaced. I have posted a new grid here.)


The New Ofsted Framework for Teaching and Learning

The new framework completes the shift of attention in recent years away from the evaluation of teaching to the evaluation of the learning taking place.

The inspectors will be looking for evidence of the PROGRESS the pupils have made in the lesson (note that this makes it essential to include a good plenary, in which the pupils focus naturally on the learning outcomes). As well as the actual content of the lesson, inspectors will expect the teacher to have appropriately taken into account the pupils’ prior learning, and evidence of consistent achievement in the pupils’ exercise books – a one-off spectacular will not secure a high level.

Levels are awarded 1—7 against four distinct elements:
1. Teaching: what the teacher is doing.
2. Learning: the activities and processes the children go through.
3. Achievement: how much they’ve moved forward during the lesson.
4. Standards: the absolute standard of the class against the national average for the pupils’ age.
Note that it is much more important to succeed with elements 2 and 3 than to be good at 1. The teacher cannot do anything about element 4, and it is quite feasible that a brilliant lesson with a special needs class could score 1,1,1,6.

The inspector may also choose to award (or not award) levels against any or all of the following where evidence in the lesson justifies a comment:
• Pupils’ attitudes, values and personal qualities
• Curriculum
• Guidance and support
• Partnership
• Leadership
• Inclusion
though these are less about the quality of your lesson, than about gathering exemplar evidence for the quality of these things across the school.

Clear descriptors are provided for the 7 levels, as follows:

2 Very Good:
All pupils are engrossed in their work and make considerably better progress than might be expected. Achievement is very high. Teaching is stimulating, enthusiastic and consistently challenging, stemming from expert knowledge of the curriculum, how to teach it and how pupils learn. There are excellent relationships in the classroom. Teaching methods are well selected and time is used very productively for independent and collaborative work. Activities and demands are matched sensitively to pupils' needs. Well-directed teaching assistants, and paired or joint teaching, reinforce and strongly support learning. Non-classroom-based Key Stage 4 and sixth-form activities such as private study, research and work placements, develop competencies very effectively.

3 Good
Most pupils make good progress and achieve well. Teaching methods are imaginative and lead to a high level of interest from most pupils. Individual needs are well catered for, and teaching assistants are well deployed and make a significant contribution. Adults relate well to pupils and expect them to work hard, but the level of challenge is realistic and pupils are productive. Staff understand the next steps pupils need to take in their learning and they provide a wide range of activities to help . them learn. Homework is challenging and extended assignments, for example in the sixth form, effectively extend what is learned in lessons.

4 Satisfactory
Most pupils' learning and progress are at least satisfactory. Teaching is accurate; teachers have secure understanding of the curriculum and the teaching of key skills. They seek to make work interesting and varied, and they involve pupils productively. Pupils understand what they are expected to do, and tasks have sufficient challenge to keep them working well, independently or co-operatively. The school provides successfully for pupils who do not respond well to school or who have difficulties in learning. Relationships are constructive and there is sensitivity to the needs of individuals and groups. Support staff are adequately managed and soundly contribute to pupils' learning. Homework extends class learning well. Pupils are given scope to make choices and apply their own ideas.

Learning cannot be satisfactory if any of the following characteristics are evident:

5 Unsatisfactory
A significant proportion of pupils make limited progress and underachieve. Teaching is dull and fails to capture pupils' interest and enthusiasm. Activities are mundane and, because of limited tuning to individuals' needs, some pupils get little from them. Greater effort is exerted on managing behaviour than learning. Some pupils are easily distracted and lack the motivation to work. Staff have an incomplete understanding of subjects or courses, resulting in patchy coverage. Their sights may be set too low and they may accept pupils' efforts too readily. Support staff provide an extra pair of hands, but little effective support for learning.

6 Poor
Many pupils underachieve and make little or no progress. Teaching lacks challenge and little or no account is taken of what pupils already know. Groups of pupils may not be able to cope, and may disengage or misbehave. Inaccuracies in teaching show insecurity in the subject matter or in understanding how pupils learn. Many pupils are unwilling to work without supervision, and group work is unproductive. Support staff are poorly managed, lack knowledge and skills, and contribute little.


If you read the descriptors, you can see that the inspectors are looking at eight competencies:
1. Progress and achievement
2. Teaching
3. Pupil repsonse
4. Relationships
5. Challenge
6. Differentiation
7. Teaching assistants
8. Homework

I have split these up into a grid which you are welcome to download and use from <span style='font-size:14pt;line-height:100%'>www.greenfield.durham.sch.uk/Wordfiles/ofsted.doc</span>. It will allow teachers to rate and improve their own teaching, and observers to evaluate the lesson.

It is not expected that a lesson will achieve at a consistent level throughout the hour – inspectors will be looking to find the ‘critical mass’ which puts a lesson at a certain level, rather than a ‘purple patch’ of the lesson. Note that the inspectors are especially hoping to see interactivity in the learning, together with pace and differentiated challenge.

However, factual errors in the teaching disqualify, and staff’s attention is drawn to the separator statement between level 4: satisfactory and level 5: unsatisfactory – ‘A lesson cannot be satisfactory if ANY of the following characteristics are evident’.

Other points:
• A school-accepted lesson plan is expected. We have this, and I feel it is still suitable.
• The trigger for special measures is 10% lessons unsatisfactory or worse.

#2 neil mcdonald

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 10:17 AM

Many thanks for this - a big thank you!
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#3 johnwayne

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 01:51 PM

many thanks!!!!!!

#4 Lesley Ann

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 03:24 PM

The New Ofsted Framework for Teaching & Learning

The new framework completes the shift of attention in recent years away from the evaluation of teaching to the evaluation of the learning taking place.

The inspectors will be looking for evidence of the PROGRESS the pupils have made in the lesson (note that this makes it essential to include a good plenary, in which the pupils focus naturally on the learning outcomes). As well as the actual content of the lesson, inspectors will expect the teacher to have appropriately taken into account the pupils’ prior learning, and evidence of consistent achievement in the pupils’ exercise books – a one-off spectacular will not secure a high level.

I have split these up into a grid which you are welcome to download and use from www.greenfield.durham.sch.uk/Wordfiles/ofsted.doc. It will allow teachers to rate and improve their own teaching, and observers to evaluate the lesson.

It is not expected that a lesson will achieve at a consistent level throughout the hour – inspectors will be looking to find the ‘critical mass’ which puts a lesson at a certain level, rather than a ‘purple patch’ of the lesson. Note that the inspectors are especially hoping to see interactivity in the learning, together with pace and differentiated challenge.

This is a fantastic resource John, thank you! :flowers:

This will make us all more reflective in our teaching and thoughtful in our planning.

I shall be using this next half term.... :D
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#5 bemused1

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 03:37 PM

I shall be sharing this with the rest of the dept as soon as possible. Many thanks :flowers:

#6 Nichola Boughey

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 04:22 PM

Well it is two weeks since the dreaded OFSTED inspectors visited our school.

Every teacher received a copy of the new OFSTED Framework for Teaching and were told to look at the descriptors - we felt that it was hard to pull off a satisfactory.

The inspector we had focused on:

1. Learning Objectives on the board - It was commented that I only had 1 not 6.
2. Effective starters.
3. Interesting and stimulating material.
4. Differentiated resources.
5. Asking drawn out questions - "What if..." and "can you explain further"....
6. A very positive relationship with students.
7. Open ended tasks that all ability students could tackle - especially at GCSE.
8. A tight plenary to show progression - involving board work.
9. A good homework to support classwork!
10 - the most important - refer back to lesson objective and tick it by the end of the lesson!

Nothing that we don't usually do I know!

I managed to get myself a 'good' OFSTED observation so I guess you can look at the level descriptors to see what that means - it was my lesson objective(s!) that apparently let me down! I was 80% very good but needed more than one lesson objective to get that 'Holy Grail' of a mark!

We were told that the inspectors would not ask for lesson plans - but they did!

We told that the emphasis was on teaching to learn not statistics - but they still asked for all my data!

What was interesting is that they asked students if they knew their levels and how to improve! Thankfully mine did!

They did ask to see assessment grades - looking for advancement!

They did want to see progression of knowledge from start to end of lesson - you have to demonstrate it!

They talked and looked at the least able and most able in the class - differentiation!

John's 7 points were definitely high on their list!

Edited by Nichola Boughey, 14 February 2004 - 04:24 PM.


#7 Paul Smith

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Posted 14 February 2004 - 09:26 PM

Thanks John it is a wonderful resource.

Paul
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#8 gav

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Posted 24 February 2004 - 11:45 AM

Brilliant John - many thanks. Thanks also to Nicola for her comments. I feel it would also be of great value if we could set up something more permanent than a thread for members to share ofsted experiences along the lines of Nicola's comments.

#9 MissKay

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Posted 24 February 2004 - 09:05 PM

I agree. We are due an OFSTED visit in the summer term and I would be eternally grateful for any advice on what to expect.

#10 JohnDClare

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Posted 03 September 2009 - 05:06 PM

All readers of this thread please note that the framework grod discussed in this thread is now out of date and has been replaced.
I have posted a new grid here.




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