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Interactive whiteboard seminar


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#46 Roy Huggins

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Posted 09 July 2006 - 11:28 PM

Hi Mick,

Many thanks for the kind comments. Don't worry about having resources to share back at the moment. I'll happily copy you what I already have. You can repay everyone on school history who have already shared by passing them on to other history teachers and popping back into the different threads and sharing your experience and wisdom as a HOD. Schoolhistory.co.uk is force for good and together our virtual community / department can help make history the best taught subject in the country. Together, sharing and working together we can make a difference!

Why reinvent the wheel when we have so much collective resources and experiences online? Good luck and keep the faith!

Kind Regards

Roy :jester:

Edited by rhuggins, 09 July 2006 - 11:35 PM.

"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#47 Andrew Field

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Posted 10 July 2006 - 12:04 AM

In order to help folks along with their IWBs I've produced a PP presentation with all the graphic organisers that I've meantioned in the above threads as well as examples of how they can be used.


You can download this file from:
http://www.schoolhis..._organisers.ppt [3MB file]

This contains many of Roy's ideas for graphic organisers - ideal to boost higher-level thinking activities using an interactive whiteboard.


Generate your own versions of my games, quizzes and eLearning activities: ContentGenerator.net

#48 Roy Huggins

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 07:20 PM

Hi Guys,

If anyone is ever passing by Mexborough School or fancies popping over for some CPD or just to brainstorm some ideas, I am more than happy to help folks out for free for a day or after school.

I also run IWB courses for SHP and Lighthouse. At a push I don't mind doing the occasional session during the school holidays if we can find a date that suits.

Please also see posting on 1001 IWB ideas for use on an IWB in the seminar section

Kind Regards

Roy
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#49 Roy Huggins

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Posted 26 May 2007 - 11:13 PM

Hi Guys,

I'm doing my usual seminar this year on IWB at the SHP Conference this year. I'm retiring from doing IWB courses for Lighthouse, so that I can concentrate on several other projects that are just about ready to hit the market, so if you are interested sign up at the SHP conference as this could be one of the last chances you will get.

If anyone is interested in sharing resources then I'll be a the bar at the usual times armed with my external hard drive for transferring files. However, you will need t least 50 gigs of space.

Kind Regards

Roy :jester:
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#50 chris clayton

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Posted 28 May 2007 - 09:38 PM

Hi Roy, have been reading your seminar with interest. In my department we have had projectors fixed to the ceiling for a year and are considering opting for using a wireless slate and mouse as a more economical alternative to the iwb. I am trialing one at the moment and have downloaded the smartboard software to go with it. If my department went for this option are there any major features of the IWB that we will miss out on? My impression is that we can still create interactive exercises and get students to use the slate instead of the iwb.
Best wishes,
Chris.

#51 Roy Huggins

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 05:57 PM

Hi Chris,

Thats a fair point Chris! I don't see any problems with using a slate at all and technology is constantly advancing in this field. However, you might be better off with a tablet pc. I'm using one at the moment that is wirelessly connected to my data projected and whiteboard. Obviously it works in the same way as a PC / Slate but I have greater flexiability and more storage space.

If I get teh chance I shall be show casing some of the feature of a wireless tablet at this years SHP conference.

Kind Regards

Roy
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#52 Roy Huggins

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Posted 08 July 2007 - 06:21 PM

Hi Guys,

Just a quick reminder to everyine who attended SHP that you can find afull detailed break down of the course here as well as many of the resources mentioned on the course. Please feel free to post any questions, which I'll try to answer here.

Kind Regards

Roy
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#53 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 08 December 2008 - 08:55 PM

A bit of a bump for this thread.

I'm leading an inset day on IWB use in school later this term and have started collating ideas / tips from this forum and other websites, along with chukcing a few ideas of my own in. The list has been modified a bit as my audience isn't going to be 'just' historians. Most of the ideas below are stolen from here anyway... but its proved a handy enough list for myself whilst developing SoW's, so if it saves somene a bit of searching, here it is (i'll edit this list as I update my document prior to the trainingI lead).

Interactive Whiteboards - using them interactively

1. Produce a "Half a Minute" quiz to review several lessons worth of work from a topic. (See http://www.contentgenerator.net/ for the free quiz generator) The beauty of the Half a Min quiz is its simplicity. You just pick a list of key words from those lessons and the quiz turns them into anagrams which the kids have to solve in 30 secs while the clock counts down and the "Countdown" music plays. Can be done as a whole class exercise or with pupils at the IWB.
2. Design a PPT with tasks on every slide. Also record yourself, explaining the key words/terms on every slide. Students who struggled with the tasks, which involved the key terms, are able to come up to the front and use the pen to tap the IWB which had explanations of the key terms as wav files.
3. Use Google Earth or Google Maps to identify locations. Pupils highlight places and / or features of the map. Switch from geographical to political / economic maps for different contexts. Ask pupils to interact with the board by asking them to find specific areas / places. They can add placemarks etc and create their own class virtual tour of (wherever) for use in future lessons. Examples of curriculum uses: English – locations mentioned in a novel can be added as placemarks, the order of which can then be altered to match the chronological sequence in which they appear in the story, or muddled to act as a sequencing test / challenge for the class.
4. Use a large image on the interactive whiteboard and ask students to grafitti all over it. Anything they feel is interesting or useful they should come to the front, circle and annotate. As you can save anything students add to the image it can then be used in many different ways. Useful as a starter in many subject areas. (Example: In RE we use an image of someone apparently ‘floating’ in mid air as part of the KS4 unit on beliefs about life and death. Pupil thoughts about the image often link in with beliefs that are about to be covered in the lesson and allow the teacher to then develop knowledge that pupils already have, and to classify it as a belief held by x,y or z group).
5. Snowballing. Display the key words for the lesson. Give the students two minutes to study them. You then use the reveal feature to hide them. The students then have 2 minutes to write as many as they can in the back of their key exercise book. You then give them 1 minute to share their answers and add to their list. You then get them to peer / self assess their answers. Simple, but effective.
6. Plenary: Continuum: After having studied various cards on individuals in a historical situation the students then drag and drop an image of the character onto a continuum on the IWB. In other subjects this can be altered to take into account cause and effect; features of an experiment or process etc.
7. Thinking Skills Review Triangle: Use a Key Question and get the students to select the five most important facts or factors related to it. Drag and drop these around on the thinking skills triangle. Explain choices – and reasons why some facts / factors have been left out.
8. Venn Diagram: Students drag and drop facts / factors to compare and contrast.
9. Use a flipchart to model an answer and to demonstrate the thinking process behind writing an answer. The flipchart can then be saved and referred back to in follow up sessions – very handy for AfL related tasks.
10. Get the students to annotate an answer to show how the answer / paragragh has been PEE'd - Point - Evidence - Explaination or CCCJed - Comment, Content, Context and Judgement
11. Scan the work of several students - put them up on the IWB and get the rest of the class to peer review the work - annotate with PEE, grade, level or highlight the use of key words and evidence etc
12. KWLH Table - Know: 5 thinks I know already about this topic - Want to know - two questions I would like answering - Learnt - 5 facts I've learnt this lesson and finally Homework - 5 new facts I've found out for HW. Use in conjunction with a KWLH table in pupil books. Ask pupils to enter ideas on the IWB as a class record.
13. IWB Bullseye. PowerPoint presentation showing on your board. Large circle divided into eight different segments. Hyperlink each segment to a question. Students have to come up to the board and click on a particular segment. This then takes them to a question, an image or some resource linked to your current topic. They then have to respond either sharing their thoughts, explaining that section etc
14. Use a digital camera, snap students in action and add thought bubbles to the pic using powerpoint / functions of the IWB. This means the plenary/starter can be the images and 'what were they thinking/doing/saying/trying to improve'. It provides a strong emotional and visual cue for memory, and is entertaining too.
15. Hide information behind pictures, or behind white pen marks – allows you to build depth of understanding on one screen – simply rub off / delete the image / mark thats hidden a fact.
16. Team activities: an example from History. Split pupils into teams. One is defending a castle, the other attacking it. Use images on screen to visualise the Castle. Groups annotate the image to say how they intend to attack > followed by the defenders annotating in another colour to say how they’d repel that attack. Can easily be adapted to incorporate prepared key words for them to drag and drop.
17. Copy, from google images, a picture which has something to do with your topic. On the floating tools bar select the pen and change it so it is white and as large as possible. Then white out the picture so the whole page looks white. When the class come in all they see is a white, whiteboard. As a starter ask them easy/difficult questions about what you have been doing for the past few weeks. The student who gets a question right comes up to the board and, with the board rubber, can make ONE CONTINUOUS STRAIGHT swipe across the board. If someone gets the question wrong you hit the back button so the last swipe is lost. Students have to guess what the picture is of before the time is up/ 10 questions have been asked.
18. Scan in a page from a good piece of work that illustrates good paragraph structuring (i.e. intro, three / four main paragraphs + conclusion). Cut each paragraph out so it is an image. Put the images on the interactive whiteboard and get students to drag them into place, justifying their choices. Once you've prepared the graphics this can be reused to help refresh effective structure in an interactive way.
19. Split videos up into clips. Grab stills form significant turning points in film and use them as stopping points - what happens next? Simple but effective predicition task - also works the other way around, grab a 'fade to black' and do a review in white on the screen. Either way, it can be recorded and used for revision purposes.
20. Use the timer. You want them to do it in 10 minutes? Simply set up the timer so that your chosen sound plays when 10 minutes is up... Also works with starters / bell tasks, switch to count down mode, have a starter task on screen and hit start as the first pupil turns up. Within the time limit all pupils have to be in the room and engaged with the task – handy if your class are coming from a variety of locations around school.
21. IWB Catchphrase - -Insert a picture of something either topic related or ridiculous.
Cover the screen with different textboxes. These could be questions to answer or words to explain or translate. Divide the class into teams. Wave the mouse over the screen and stop suddenly over a textbox. If a team can answer the question etc correctly then delete that square. Continue in same way till a team can correctly identify the picture beneath.
22. A good revision tool using the IWB is to play the Richard and Judy game, 'You say. We pay'. A volunteer sits with his back to the board whilst behind him/her images of key features from a unit of study are revealed (you can do this by creating ppt. with time settings to change slides after 30 seconds). The class must describe the significance of the figure on the IWB so that the student can guess who is being described. Run the game with three different students (who have to stand outside the class until it is their turn) to add a competitive element.
23. Scan or type in a word search on to a flipchart. Using the highlighter tool the students have to come out and find the words. For a more competitive element use the clock and give the class a time limit. Students having only one go each gets them all shouting the answers to each other. It can get noisy but you normally get all of them engaged.
24. Group based research task. Have a selection of answers on the board; give groups 20 research questions; when they find an answer they go to the board and annotate the answer sheet (using a specified group colour) to show which question number it answers. Group with the most correct answers at the end wins a prize. Simple, engaging and fast revision exercise in which pupils interact with one another, react to interactions with the whiteboard and have to work as a team.
25. A variation on the above: give out descriptions of items (for example, features of places, descriptions of elements, items found in a workshop etc...) Pupils work in groups to add ‘pins’ to a related image (a map, photo, periodic table, layout of a room etc). Each ‘Pin’ has to have a note attached to it – depending on the level of difficulty you could have this ranging from simply identification of question number; an extension of the note in the clues; or a statement about its relationship with other features of the image etc).
26. ‘Pass the Pen’ – simple example from History lessons. Reviewing a unit of study prior to an assessment in order to have content / concepts fresh in pupils minds. Put: Who, What, Where, When and Why? As large key words on the screen. Simply pass the pen to a pupil – they have to add a comment (based on the content of the unit). They can then pass the pen to any pupil NOT sat at their table (and not to anyone else who has already had the pen). As they pass the pen, they have to explain to the class why they’ve added the comment. State the minimum number of ‘pen passes’ prior to beginning so that everyone knows that they might be ‘got’. In history it’s easy to then use the highlighter to identify themes. I tend to do the first theme as an example, and then get pupils to do the remaining themes.
27. Spot the anachronism. Simple case of finding images in which there are things out of place. Pupils come up and highlight them. Variations – spot the hazard would work well in many subjects.
28. ‘Wordshoot’ quiz league. Wordshoot is an interactive quiz based on definitions. Pupils read the definition then ‘shoot’ the right answer. It works on an arcade game basis and levels get progressively harder. Pupils can be put into teams or work individually and take the challenge on the IWB in front of the rest of the class. Keep a record of ‘High Scores’ and reward the termly winners. Wordshoot quizzes can be created using the online quiz creator at classtools.net – and the quizzes can be stored on the network for use on any computer in school. Great at improving retention of knowledge and getting pupils to remember key definitions. It can get a bit loud if classes like it though.... Note: Wordshoot is one of a wide range of free templates available via classtools.net
29. Pupils use the highlighter tool to identify key words and themes in a text. In advance, enter the text into http://www.wordle.net and paste the resulting word map into the next slide. Use this as a prompt for discussing the effectiveness of pupil annotations – Wordle places emphasis on words / phrases that are used the most in a passage, so in theory it will place emphasis on the key points...
30. Use http://www.scriblink.com/ to share enquiries, discussions or problems with other classes. This website acts as an online whiteboard, so you can set up multiclass challenges, engage in discussion with other classes, schools or agencies etc.

Interactive uses of digital video

12 ways to use multimedia videos in lessons
1) To develop an understanding of the ways in which different Interpretations of events are formed. For example, pupils studying Northern Ireland as a GCSE coursework unit may be asked to consider how and why there are different Interpretations of the events of bloody Sunday. At the beginning of a study of this complex study, present students with one multimedia presentation outlining an Interpretation of the events. Ask them to consider why the events of that day happened, to think about ‘blame’ and any justifications. I use this video on Bloody Sunday for this purpose - After watching the video discuss the reasons for the shootings, ask them who they think the guilty and innocent parties are. Then ask them why they think this. Focus on the way in which the video, representing the media, has highlighted certain issues, whilst ignoring alternative images and statements. Follow up tasks could include pupils creating videos presenting alternative interpretations, making use of different images, statements and views.
Pupil activity: highlighting ‘correct’ statements on a prepared sheet whilst watching the video. Afterwards, they can use the IWB to select correct statements and to make links between them.
2) To support writing frames on issues where pupils need to consider whether decisions were justified. For example, this video on the dropping of the Atomic Bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki () is used alongside note making exercises leading to an essay in which pupils consider whether or not the dropping of the bombs was justified. Essentially the video is presenting them with Truman’s justifications, along with images and statistics that show the human cost of the decision. Used as an introduction to the note making and planning of the essay, this video can act as stimulus for a debate about whether the bombing was justified.
Pupil activity: add notes to research frame whilst watching the video. Use IWB to model sections of their response following further research.
3) To provide a Chronological overview of course contents. A relatively simple and straight forward idea. In this video, , I have simply included a series of key events covered in a study of Russian History at GCSE level. The video can be utilised as part of the introduction to the course, to provide them with an overview of what will be studied but also has uses in revision sessions and can simply be played as pupils enter the room for lessons to reinforce knowledge of key dates, events and personalities.
Pupil activity: identify themes in the video and note these down. Use IWB ‘drag and drop’ to sequence a number of the key events to check chronological awareness and use highlighter tool to identify themes in the sequence.
4) To model annotation exercises and ensure pace in lessons. For example, in this video on the Dissolution of the Monasteries, http://youtube.com/watch?v=onrtilMxTNE, pupils are provided with print outs of the sources included in the video, have the annotation task explained to them and are asked to highlight a key phrase in each section of the source, whilst it is shown on screen.
Pupil activity: underline or highlight key phrases in the sources whilst the video plays. Follow up by asking pupils to highlight these on the IWB.
5) To develop an Understanding of the ways in which Propaganda has been used in the past. Students often find propaganda and associated issues quite difficult to comprehend, and many of mine take media footage and portrayal of the rich and famous for granted, and as fact. In this video on the way in which Stalin developed the Cult of personality, http://youtube.com/watch?v=LklqtLB9E_Y, pupils are asked to consider the different types of image that are used and note 5 themes that Stalin appeared to have focussed on when deciding how to portray himself to the public. Pupils quickly identify things such as closeness to Lenin, the Military and Industrial themes along with things such as Stalin’s appearance as a wise, caring and strong leader. This has helped students to understand the reasons why images were doctored at the times, and can easily be linked in with other issues on the course. Similar videos would work well on studies of Nazi propaganda.
Pupil activity: Identify themes whilst watching the video and note these down. Use IWB to analyse a number of the images after watching the video. Annotation and highlighter tools can be used for this.
6) To encourage and develop inquisitive minds. In this video http://youtube.com/watch?v=HktCrX5wVBE a variety of images related to the Slave trade are used. Students are asked to note down what they think the images are showing, and are prompted to do so at various stages in the video. The clip can be paused to provide more time, to enable discussion of the evidence seen in each section and to enable pupils to ask questions. In the second half of this video, I usually ask pupils to create a list of questions that they would like to know the answers to. Normally the questions that pupils come up with can be referred to when outlining how the class will develop their understanding of slavery, and shows them that the scheme of work is closely related to things that they want to know about.
Pupil activity: activities built into the video. Complete these as directed. Follow up – use spotlight tool to investigate sections of images.
7) To promote local history elements of international conflicts. When teaching about the two World wars I try to emphasise the impact that the conflicts had on the local area. There are clearly many ways of achieving this. One of the most popular methods that I’ve utilised is through linking the conflict with local sportsmen in the First World War. In this video, http://youtube.com/watch?v=AGhsdeNnTqk, I outline the feats and fates of a number of local sportsmen. The video can be used in a number of ways. Firstly, it makes the war locally relevant to pupils, many of whom support teams for whom these sportsmen played. It provides an opportunity to discuss social history and place events into some kind of context (issues such as International footballers actually being allowed to fight often crop up in discussion – would that happen nowadays?) likewise the value of money at the time is often noted - £1000 pound transfers being noted as substantial. It also offers a route into the study of the way in which the war was fought, as pupils can be asked to concentrate on the way in which the men perished, which provides a number of clues as to the way in which warfare was conducted at the time.
Pupil activity: varied, depending on the focus of the lesson.
8) Lyric analysis tasks. There are many examples of songs with a historical theme. Many of these can be used alongside related images to create a video that introduces a task based around the lyrics. Classic examples of these include songs relating to the Levellers movement, the troubles in Northern Ireland and the Vietnam War. Perhaps one of the most often used artists for this purpose is Bob Dylan. In this video, http://youtube.com/watch?v=3AXDyBtqcQY, Tony Fox has used Dylan’s song about Emmett Till in a video that could be used for the purpose of introducing lyric analysis.
Pupil activity: annotation of the lyrics based on the visual aids used in the video.
9) To provide pupils with an opportunity to record and present their work in a different way. It’s all good and well having teachers creating lots of clips and showing them to classes but there’s a huge amount of potential for pupils to create multimedia resources. Using movie making equipment, and podcasts, provides students with another means of thinking through their understanding of the past, can allow them to be more creative in their work and offers them a means of creating things that they are more likely to enjoy, reuse and remember. Examples of these include Tony Foxes students writing alternative lyrics to an Arctic Monkeys tune to create a video relating to the Suffragette movement, which can be accessed here - http://youtube.com/watch?v=niCATls8AYk. An alternative is this video created by pupils for use in an assembly, http://youtube.com/watch?v=Gve8S7ZSH60
Pupil activity: obviously, making them! Whilst watching the pupil created content, pupils complete peer review sheets.
10) To engage and inspire. Movies can be made that inject humour into the classroom, whilst having a very serious purpose. The Revision Pig video, http://youtube.com/watch?v=UThIcoyE1zk, for example results in howls of laughter from pupils whilst making some very serious points. As it’s so amusing, pupils are quite willing to listen to it several times and do take the points quite seriously.
Pupil activity: follow up on IWB – identify and note ways to revise.
11) To tell the story. Videos can be used to tell the story in a basic but engaging way. For example, this video on William the Conqueror, http://youtube.com/watch?v=xfmjiZ_isso, provides a basic narrative of the events of 1066 in a way that pupils find accessible and enjoyable – though it is annoying when pupils start singing along...
Pupil activity: sequencing task.
12) An alternative to the ‘Newspaper Report.’ The BBC Class Clips series provides several excellent opportunities to do this. Show a video clip without sound but with ‘news headlines’ and ‘breaking news’ comments at the foot of the screen – easy to insert in most movie editing programmes and already inserted into a number of the BBC Class Clips series. Pupils watch the clip several times with a task of creating the newsreader script for the news broadcast. Pupils can then make use of an IT suite or laptops in the classroom to add the voiceover, creating their own news report on events. An exemplar video created by American colleagues about the way that D Day might have reported, is available here, http://youtube.com/watch?v=Px_XBJHrs4I.
Pupil activity: note making. IWB follow up – collate key ideas and add notes on context, mood etc.
Sources of Video clips for other subject areas:

http://video.nationa...phic.com/video/ - Environment, Music, Current Affairs, Science & Space, Travel & Culture.
http://video.google....ucberkeley.html - videos from Berkeley University. A variety of subject areas.
http://www.pbs.org/w...rams/index.html - wide range of documentaries.
http://www.archive.org/index.php - over 100,000 copy permitted video clips.
http://sciencehack.com/ - has plenty of categories.

Links to online resources

Resource / Template websites

http://www.prometheanplanet.com/ - the resources section hosts flipcharts for all curriculum areas. You can also download updates, resource packs and access accredited training via the website (the entry level training is free).
http://classtools.net/ - a selection of templates that enable the easy creation of interactive activities for use on IWB’s.
http://www.contentgenerator.net/ - create interactive games and activities for use on PC’s or IWB’s. All of the generators are available to any department that asks for them.
http://www.iwb.org.uk/ - portal site. Currently links to free KS3 resources for Core subjects and Geography.
http://www.exploratree.org.uk/ - series of templates for use on IWB’s.
http://www.sandfields.co.uk/games/ - has a number of reasonable games available that might be useful at times.

General

http://www.icharts.net/portal/ - provides a range of graphs that can be used in a variety of contexts. For example, sporting results over time; economic trends; geographical information etc. A similar site that has a ‘play’ feature to enable developments to be visualised is http://www.gapminder.org
http://earth.google.com/ - Google Community provides a range of resources that cover all curriculum areas. A similar resource is http://maps.live.com/ which has the potential to be annotated in the same way but lacks some of Google Earth’s Interactive features.
http://www.bbcmotiongallery.com – a wide selection of video clips.
http://www.bbc.co.uk...ningzone/clips/ - BBC collection of video clips specifically chosen for their educational value.
http://www.ngfl-cymr...tc-ks3-home.htm - Virtual Teachers Centre (Wales). Has a wide range of resources. Some are ideal for use on IWB’s.
http://tre.ngfl.gov.uk/server.php - The Teachers Resource Exchange has resources for all subject areas on it.
http://www.wmnet.org.uk/wmnet/14.cfm - this website provides access to a range of resources created as part of a Becta project aimed at improving the use of Interactive Whiteboards. (Mainly Core Subjects).
http://www.bbc.co.uk...websites/11_16/ - access BBC materials for your subject area via this page.
http://www.yhgfl.net/Resources - Yorkshire and Humberside Grid for Learning website.
http://www.scriblink.com/ - allows collaborative use of Whiteboards. Would enable 2 or more classes to be working on the same document, at the same time.
http://www.text2mindmap.com/ - converts inputted text into a mindmap.

Maths

http://www.bgfl.org/...iteboard_tools/ - links to resources designed to support the National Numeracy Strategy.
http://www.interacti...k/indexmp1.html - evaluation versions of a range of interactive tools. Aimed more at KS2 but may be worth exploring.
http://www.lgfl.net/..... Mathematics/ - a series of links provided by Havering LEA.
http://www.iwbmathst...Flipcharts.html – a collection of Maths resources designed for use on Promethean boards.
http://www.standards...Resources/itps/ - another set of resources for the Numeracy strategy. Though aimed at the primary framework, they may be of use.
http://www.active-maths.co.uk/ - a selection of activities for use on IWB’s with accompanying worksheets.

English

http://www.wordle.net/ - creates visual representations of passages of text. Bases the graphical representation on word frequency, so can be helpful as an aid to developing skills relating to skim reading / scanning of text.
http://www.bgfl.org/...=15&p=248,index

Science

http://www.childrens...nchester.ac.uk/ - covers a range of Science areas.
http://www.p3d.com.br/eng/index.html
http://www.visualsim...simulations.php
http://www.think-ban...wb/science.html

MFL

http://hcmc.uvic.ca/clipart/ - free clipart aimed at MFL teachers.
http://atschool.eduw...atoes/index.htm
http://www.frenchtea...interactive.htm
http://www.mflresources.org.uk/

Technology

http://www.thegrid.o..._in_d_and_t.pdf
http://www.topmarks.co.uk/?Subject=7
http://www.yenka.com/freecontent/

Humanities

http://earth.google.com/rome/ - Interactive tour of Ancient Rome.
http://www.geography.org.uk/ - a wide range of visual resources and activity ideas.
http://www.schoolhis...?showtopic=7568 – Online discussion about uses of an Interactive Whiteboard in history lessons.
http://www.geography...ngtoday.org.uk/ - wide range of resources.

Research

http://www.virtualle.../iwb/index.html - a series of case studies about effective use of Interactive Whiteboards.
http://www.teachers..../whiteboardtips - Teachers TV series on using Interactive Whiteboards. It’s aimed at Primary teachers but the skills and ideas covered are transferable.
http://www.e-learnin...whiteboards.htm - series of academic articles on the use of Interactive Whiteboards.
http://schools.becta...t...e_02&rid=86 – the official government line on the benefits of using Interactive Whiteboards.
http://schools.becta...t...2&rid=11910 – discusses ways in which IWB’s can improve teacher efficiency.

#54 Dafydd Humphreys

Dafydd Humphreys

    Thinking outside the box...

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 05:32 AM

Wow! :clapping:
My Youtube Channels: <a href="http://www.youtube.c...m/Learnhistory" target="_blank">LearnHistory</a> (RIP) :( and <a href="http://www.youtube.c.../Learnhistory2" target="_blank">LearnHistory2</a> and now <a href="http://www.youtube.c.../Learnhistory3" target="_blank">LearnHistory3</a>

#55 Tony Fox

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 11:49 AM

As usaul I stand stunned by your brilliance. Thanks once again for the mentions.
Can I ask for a revision to your notes?
Could people use http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ywc3YFeMiYE for the emmett Till as this updated video provides more context.
Many thanks, Tony
"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr

#56 Maurice Savage

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Posted 18 December 2008 - 10:41 AM

Thought the information Dan collated would disappear into the depths of the forum so I made it into a pdf file for people to download and save.

He is still improving on the information so more to come.

Maurice

PS Put the Word document on as well.
<a href="http://www.videohistorytoday.com" target="_blank">www.VideoHistoryToday.com</a>
Video clips from historical places

www.AmericanCivilWarCollection.com
Unique Collections of Photographs, Maps and Lesson Plans

#57 Roy Huggins

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Posted 30 December 2008 - 02:12 AM

Hi Guys,

You can watch me showcasing some of my ideas at an E-Help Conference in France. Its not the best video of me - hope its useful - many thanks to Richard for filming and editing it!

Developing Interactive Teaching Styles

Kind Regards

Roy :jester:
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#58 Roy Huggins

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 07:30 PM

Hi Guys,

I've just been playing around with my new Promeanthan IWB. The Jury is still out at the moment but I've made / updated some of my graphic organisers. You may find them useful. I've customised and made them a lot more attractive. Please feel free to share. You will need the relevant software in order to open them.

Smart Notes Attached File  Smart_Graphic_Organisers_Zipped.zip   884.52K   32 downloads

Active Studio / Flip Charts Attached File  Promenthan.zip   1.41MB   40 downloads

JPG Image Versions: Attached File  Thinking_Skills.zip   2.88MB   44 downloads

Have fun and enjoy. The last file includes all the graphic organisers that I use from time to time on my IWB.

Unfortunately, I will not be delivering my usual seminar at the SHP Conference this year as my ideas have now become main stream and are included in the most of the boardworks and Heinemann KS3 & KS4 resources. There is an outside chance that I might be showcasing the new History in Progress CDs at SHP for Heinemann, but I'm looking forward to retiring into the background for a while.

Kind Regards

Roy :jester:
PS If Tom Dolly is still out there you are an inspiration!
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus

#59 Andrew Field

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 11:42 AM

I've just been playing around with my new Promeanthan IWB.


If you've got a Promethean board, or in fact any sort of interactive board, you should download the new Promethian software - seemingly renamed 'Activesoftware inspire edition' it is promoted as working on all interactive boards and on all operating systems. Promethean board owners can get the software for free whereas I think others can get a free cut down version or pay for the full version.

I haven't had a chance to try it out yet, but it looks like a very worthy upgrade which should make such boards even more capable. I'll report back when I've got it up and running at school. The software is beta until March when the final version is expected.


Generate your own versions of my games, quizzes and eLearning activities: ContentGenerator.net

#60 Roy Huggins

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Posted 29 June 2009 - 10:08 PM

Hi Guys,

I've uploaded and attached an updated copy of an inset / training day course that I can offer to schools who are interested in developing their use of interactive teaching styles using ICT. If anyone is interested then email me sometime. My chief aim to share good practice and ideas. The course below has been designed with a particular school in mind and can be easily adapted. Its essentially, an evolution of the course that I used to deliver for Lighthouse for an international audience.

Attached File  Course_Ouline_for_International_Lycee_in_Paris.doc   41K   28 downloads


Kind Regards

Roy :jester:
"Men are disturbed, not by the things that happen, but by their opinion of the things that happen." - Epictetus




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