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Teaching the Tudors


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#1 Carole Faithorn

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 03:53 PM

Teaching the Tudors

Whilst Forum members rarely seem enthusiastic about teaching the Industrial Revolution and the English Civil Wars are notoriously unpopular with one of our more illustrious members, ‘the Tudors’ seems a topic area which most members enjoy teaching.

This Seminar has two main aims:

1. To develop a pool of resources to which everyone can contribute and into which everyone can dip: a resource that will be helpful for PGCE students, NQTs and old-hands alike.

What can you contribute?
* Titles of textbooks that you recommend.
* Websites: good for student or teacher research.
* Online resources: worksheets, online lessons, games and quizzes
* Offers of offline resources which you are happy to share with other members
* Descriptions of lessons which have worked well.
* Useful information that does not fall into any of the previous categories!


2. To provide an opportunity for Forum members to ask for specific help and guidance when teaching any aspect of ‘the Tudors’ whatever the level.

I am hoping that as many Forum members as possible will contribute to this Seminar - even if it is only a very short post mentioning one website that you have found useful.

No need to be an expert!

#2 Lesley Ann

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 04:27 PM

What an excellent idea for a seminar!

This is a good website on the Tudors for both students and teacher research....The Tudors

Have a look at the images on the wives scroll over the pictures Posted Image

Edited by David Bryant, 18 September 2012 - 04:17 PM.
Change links as previous ones 'dead'

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#3 Gorbash

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 04:33 PM

May as well start this off with a willingness to send out to anybody who is interested the following resources:

A4 size ppt files of the following portraits of Elizabeth I- Coronation, Rainbow, Pelican, Phoenix, Rainbow, Armada, Ditchley, Ermine & Sieve.

Quiz based on problems faced by Elizabeth I. Once again a ppt file- 5 slides in total. Based on an activity that Ian Dawson designed for 'A' Level but which after a litle work was used last year with yr 7&8 pupils in two schools. I'll also throw in a pupil fill-in answer sheet and the answers to accompany the quiz.

'How to be a Puritan' task sheet (identify which activities Puritans would and wouldn't agree with. Also included would be the master sheet for a Snakes & Ladders game for pupils to create on Puritanism (based on answers from 'How to be a Puritan' task!). Again its a ppt fle!

Think thats all I've got that would be of any use to people...rest of my Tudor stuff is junk which I've used once and then thought "Well that was c**p; I'm not going to do that again!".

Although if you give me a little time I'm working on a dungeons & Dragons type game based on Elizabeth I & Mary, Queen of Scots (based on something originally done several years ago by Rob Martin). Should have that done by next week if I have a free day on Saturday or Sunday...

Paul

ps- Anybody who knows Steven Yelland may possibly already have the stuff I've mentioned above...I've given it all to him and I know that he has passed it on to several people (all of whom post on this messageboard).
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#4 Lesley Ann

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Posted 17 November 2004 - 05:21 PM

For those of you who teach A Level check out John Guy's website on the Tudors.
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#5 Elle

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 07:40 AM

There is this website which I have used:

http://www.tudorhistory.org

I hope that works!

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#6 donald cumming

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 08:29 AM

When I was starting out, my PGCE tutor showed us a groovy BBC B role play game where you took the part of a young country bumpkin trying to work their way into the court of Elizabeth I, avoiding spies and so on. I have been meaning to find out if anyone has a copy as it would be ideal to modernise!

Anyone seen it?

Donald

#7 Lou Phillips

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 01:07 PM

Have just done an excellent role play on Henry VIII divorce. (we are behind cos we do native americans first)

I was given it on my PGCE but never used it, I believe its from Practical History book or magazine or something!

Pupils are in groups of 2 or 3 representing real characters (e.g. henry, catherine, anne boleyn, willlam warham, cromwell, cranmer, the pope etc) they are given cards of information and an activity to write a speech to present at an imaginary meeting to discuss the divorce.

It really gets them thinking about all the pros and cons of the issue in a very real way.

The group are quite able but rather chatty- yesterday while writing the speeches etc they were ridiculously noisy and I was worried about the final outcome. However today they got into character, studiously made notes on the other characters and had really thought about why they would be for/ against the divorce.

If anyone's interested PM me and I can send you the cards. Lou x

Edited by Lou Phillips, 19 November 2004 - 01:08 PM.

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#8 Ian Dawson

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 05:05 PM

When I was starting out, my PGCE tutor showed us a groovy BBC B role play game where you took the part of a young country bumpkin trying to work their way into the court of Elizabeth I, avoiding spies and so on.  I have been meaning to find out if anyone has a copy as it would be ideal to modernise!

Anyone seen it?

Donald

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I'd like to get hold of this too. Several people have mentioned this recently - it was called 'Court'. It was produced as one of a group of computer-based for the BBC machines - published by Longman - problems may arrive over copyright as a result but a modern version would be good to have. If anyone has a copy could the contact Chris Culpin or myself via the SHP website?

Working on a role-play on Henry VIII's foreign policy 1509-1529 that will go on the thinkinghistory site for December. Also having a go at a couple more Henry VII activities in the New Year to coincide with a 6th form conference on the Wars of the Roses and Henry VII in Spalding in February.

Ian

#9 D Letouzey

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Posted 19 November 2004 - 05:39 PM

A4 size ppt files of the following portraits of Elizabeth I- Coronation, Rainbow, Pelican, Phoenix, Rainbow, Armada, Ditchley, Ermine & Sieve


Some of them seem to be on these websites :

http://www.luminariu...it/elizface.htm

http://www.tudor-por...Elizabeth_I.htm
http://www.tudor-por...Elizabeth_2.htm

some materials (England map):
http://www.english.u...-201/materials/

Just to compare, in the French curriculum, on the XVIth, we study the Renaissance, both the Art history side and the Humanists, as part of the European heritage.
In this view, Michelangelo or Erasmus have a greater role than Henri VIII or Elizabeth. ;)

See this Florence map :
http://www.stg.brown...e_scene_big.gif
(in a webpage on Florence and the Renaissance : http://aphgcaen.free...ue/florence.htm )
Daniel

Edited by D Letouzey, 23 November 2004 - 08:30 AM.


#10 Laurence Hicks

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 06:07 PM

One thing that worked well for me recently was an Elizabeth I Personality Test worksheet cribbed from an old Stanley Thornes KS3 teacher's workbook.

On the face of it, the worksheet was pretty uninspiring. The students had to imagine they were Elizabeth and were sitting, so to speak, in the psychiatrist's chair. The worksheet contained 20 questions, with 3 multiple choice answers for each question.

The students had 10 minutes or so to complete the task, and then we went through the answers so they could correct their work, in preparation for the next activity.

This was a sorting exercise, in which the students put the answers under one of four headings: those which showed Elizabeth acted like a queen, was sly and cunning, was able to compromise, or was careful with money.

Finally, the students used this information to answer the question 'What was the secret of Elizabeth's success?'

All very simple, but surprisingly effective. Also lends itself to obvious extension work (eg. Why did Elizabeth need to be sly and cunning?). And the more able will make comparisons between Elizabeth and Henry VII, too.
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#11 Guest_andy_walker_*

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 08:10 PM

When I was starting out, my PGCE tutor showed us a groovy BBC B role play game where you took the part of a young country bumpkin trying to work their way into the court of Elizabeth I, avoiding spies and so on.  I have been meaning to find out if anyone has a copy as it would be ideal to modernise!

Anyone seen it?

Donald

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I remember this (I think!). Wasn't it called "Elizabethan Court"? It was put out at around the same time as John Simkin's BBC stuff like "Attack on the Somme" in the 80's - maybe he can shed some light on this?
Fernleaf Educational rings a bell (but it might be the wrong bell)

Anyway I think I have this program on a 186 in the shed :woo:

Edited by andy_walker, 25 November 2004 - 08:25 AM.


#12 Dom_Giles

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Posted 29 November 2004 - 06:51 PM

I've used a couple of worksheets from schoolhistory.co.uk that have been great. Especially the ones on Babbington and code breaking. The students love the challange. A great way of starting the lesson is to write something on the board in code, which, by the end of the lesson will become obvious.

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#13 Lesley Ann

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Posted 02 March 2008 - 07:00 PM

I do a lesson overview of the Tudors based on this brilliant activity on www.thinkinghistory.co.uk

Ever confused Mary Tudor and Mary, Queen of Scots? A simple way of disentangling the Marys and many other confusing people see here: www.thinkinghistory.co.uk/ActivityBase/PhysicalFamilyTrees.html
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#14 Cait

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 09:55 PM

Hi
It would be great to get a copy of that Tudor role play
Thanks,
Caitríona O'donnell

#15 cj.ayres

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Posted 26 April 2008 - 07:17 AM

Hi
we do a hot seating activity where the teacher takes on the role of Henry VIII, Catherine of Aragon and Anne Boleyn (different hats/props required). The lesson takes the form of 3 press conference's which take place between 1527 and 1533. The students are reports who are trying to find out about Henry and Catherine's relationship and by the end of the lesson they should be able to give reasons why Henry wanted to divorce Catherine.
The students are given three press packs at different intervals of the lesson and they have to pose 3 questions that they would like to ask either Henry, Catherine or Anne. This is good as it gets them thinking about what the important issues are and how to think an enquiry through. A press conference is then held and students can ask their questions.

To get through the whole thing takes around two lessons with the second half of the second lesson spent drafting a newspaper report on the split with the Catholic church or split with Catherine.

Class seem to enjoy it and I think it makes quite a complicated subject accessible for all.

If anyone wants the resources, just ask or I will try and upload them.




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