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Accelerated Learning & History teaching


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#31 Dom_Giles

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Posted 21 December 2005 - 02:17 PM

I read about that too. This means that if you are doing some History revision and wearing some strong aftershave, make sure you put that aftershave on in the morning of the exam. It WILL help your memory (or would that be classed as cheating?)

Thinking is SO important Baldrick. What do YOU think?
I think thinking is SO important, my Lord.


#32 donald cumming

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 08:41 PM

Body SMART mini idea:

Try getting students into teams of 4 or 5 and one at a time they come up for 20 seconds (or so) - they have a double page of textbook to read. They go back to their teams and write what they read on sugar paper. The next one comes up and does the same. Repeat through the team and maybe one extra time. Then they swap with another team and try to add more from their own memories. Then discuss and award prizes for the most information/best team/best presented. You will need to model strategies for this (eg first looking at headings and reading pictures) to ensure high quality work and it is top movement-filled fun. Finish it off with a quiz to check their learning.

This is really just a version of the picture team/memory idea, but my lot love it - year 9 boys were crazy for it!


We have also tried getting students to pretend they are putting academic gowns on before they write long answers - to get in the formal frame of mind. Suddenly they all remember things 'agree to an extent...' and that 'there were several reasons why...' without me needing to constantly remind them!

;)

#33 donald cumming

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Posted 20 July 2006 - 09:43 AM

Accelerated Learning resources

This website, part of Cheshire's SALT website, has some excellent summaries, links and resources on a whole host of AL topics and ideas.

Well worth a browse!

SALT mind friendly learning

Have a great summer,
Donald

#34 donald cumming

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Posted 03 September 2006 - 04:17 PM

And, to start the year off on this sunny Sunday here is another website with some very interesting information and resources on it:

Brain Connection

Hope everyone had a great summer - has anyone planned new AL ideas they care to share? It would be grand to hear some!

Donald

:D


Edit: This website has some interesting summaries of brain-based elarning theory too:
PostGrad Medical Training site

Edited by donald cumming, 02 October 2006 - 02:13 PM.


#35 donald cumming

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Posted 03 October 2006 - 09:48 PM

Carrying on the theme of links to the interweb, here is a site with lots of resources to use and theory to beef up your arguments with resistant colleagues:

Try me!

:)

Hope its all useful!

DC

#36 donald cumming

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Posted 19 January 2007 - 11:28 AM

Using your body as a living map:

It struck me the other day that to give an idea of physical place/geographic locations you can just use your own body as the map.

Eg: Get students to stand up. Head = Scotland. Tummy = Wales. Feet = Cornwall. Body = England. Rear = East Anglia. Point to the relevant area for other locations...

I've used it for finding places in Africa and it worked really well:
Students stand up. They place their left hand on their head, elbows out to the side. This gives a shape that more than passes for West Africa. With their right hand they can point to places on the west coast - for example their elbow gives a pretty useful location for Gambia - which is ideal when teaching about the slave trade (especially handy considering the anniversary of the ending of the slave trade is this year!).


:thumbup
dc

#37 MickCutler

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Posted 19 January 2007 - 08:52 PM

Using your body as a living map:

It struck me the other day that to give an idea of physical place/geographic locations you can just use your own body as the map.

Eg: Get students to stand up. Head = Scotland. Tummy = Wales. Feet = Cornwall. Body = England. Rear = East Anglia. Point to the relevant area for other locations...


This reminded me of the song Island man by the waterboys from the album room to roam which has the lyrics:

Of my body England is the spine
the backbone and the trunk
My shoulders span the mighty Tyne
London sprawls across my rump
Cornwall my crooked ancient leg
Wales two hands held apart
Scotland is my dreaming head
Ireland is my heart
Every time I open my mouth, some damn fool speaks!

#38 donald cumming

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 10:35 AM

Just as an add-on, Teaching History 118 (re-thinking differentiation) has some excellent ideas in it too on this very subject. Maria Osowecki's Rennaissance plan; A'Level ideas and much more!

If you don't have it in school you can get it from the Teaching History archive -

HA Website

Worth getting your department to join for sure!

Donald

:lol:

#39 donald cumming

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Posted 31 January 2007 - 11:13 AM

And.....


....an interesting and interactive summary of research into brain-based learnign from the Open University.

Open Learn

It is a site with some interesting free courses on many a topic - well worth checking out!

DC

#40 donald cumming

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Posted 08 June 2007 - 02:29 PM

Afternoon all,

I'd like to share an outstanding lesson from my colleague, Mr Gallagher, when teaching about the Nazi education system. Essentially he set his room up like a Nazi school. Students had to recite the Hitler ode (Hitler Youth ode), and were then sent to different 'lessons' - group work based on specific subjects - where they found Nazi educational activities and extension material. The groups were arranged according to ability and SMARTs (eg very picture smart students went to art, kinaesthetic students had PE related activities to try out, girls had different lessons to attend).

Once they had completed the activities they came back as a group and discussed their findings and the intention/consequences of such an education system. They students had incredibly mature thoughts, and also a deep understanding of the topic. This was then linked to sources (eg Stephen Roberts) on the success of the system.

Lots of SMARTs covered and a learning experience rather than a dry lesson on the subject - I was most impressed and will be 'borrowing' the idea next time I teach it. I'm sure I haven't done it justice here - Mr G will be at shp this year if you want more details!


DC
:teacher:

Edited by donald cumming, 09 June 2007 - 03:46 PM.


#41 Andrew Sweet

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Posted 17 June 2007 - 06:42 PM

Thanks to Donald's advice at the SHP conference, we have changed a few things that I'd like to share to promote ACCELERATED LEARNING in Crime and Punishment.

Firstly, the class attempted to write a class revision guide based on some of the ideas of Accelerated Learning. The class of 15 wrote small chapters using the format of the SHP guide and some good websites.

Secondly, I taught a skills based lesson around Accelerated Learning and the class then went away to write prompt cards with key phrases, words and cartoons to make certain difficult topics memorable.

Third and finally, we moved classrooms and used mini whiteboards in 2 memorable lessons. Another idea we didn't get round to was a lesson or two in the exam hall. Again an idea from Donald's SHP Crime and Punishment workshop last summer.

It works a treat. Any new ideas, please let us know.

Andrew







;)







With the exams all but upon us here's another thought:

This year we're going to stick up key images/words from the examined courses on the walls outside the exam room, so the students get last minute visual reminders that may help their memories. Nothing complicated, just simple triggers. I may also see if we can play some of the music they'll have heard as they arrive at school andmill about - whether it be prince charming by adam and the ants or the songs from carabret. If it helps the students to remember it surely had to be an idea worth trying!

Lastly I've tried using a bit of 'positive anchoring' with my year 11 classes over the past months. They imagine themselves sitting at their exam desk, calm, happy and writing brilliant answers. As they imagine this they gently push a fingernail into a finger. The idea of this is that the brain associates the nail/finger feeling with a sense of calm and success. I'll report back after the exams, but it has certainly helped one or two students who had been panicking in lessons that 'everything was all too much!' They were able to refocus well, and to be more productive, at least during the lesson.

Donald



#42 donald cumming

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Posted 07 May 2008 - 08:58 PM

Time to bump this seminar up the list I think - and I would like as many fresh ideas as possible from all the great SchoolHistory minds out there please!

A few 'new' ideas that have come my way over the past months include:

1) Concept mapping the paper II exam questions so students have strategies for answering the type of question before they go into the exam. A map gives a very clear visual framework - sticking the maps outside the exam hall boosts confidence AND memory.

2) Body Smart memory tricks as a revision activity. Can your students think of a way to represent the number of months it took the Nazis to eliminate other political parties?

3) Mysteries - give groups a bunch of sources without any explanation and ask them to work it out for themselves and present their theories!

4) Writing on the tables in whiteboard marker pens. Creating visual representations of WWI poetry like this has been v effective indeed (thanks to LG for that one!)

So what else is new?

:-)

#43 donald cumming

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Posted 20 May 2008 - 05:47 PM

Just a quick link to a body SMART activity Ian Dawson has been generous to host over on his Thinking History website:


Body Smart Rebellion

Hope its useful!

:-)

#44 Guest_Nick Dennis_*

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 12:02 PM

Don, have you produced a booklet with all these ideas in for training purposes? :)

#45 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 09:43 AM

I've nudged Don and asked him what hes got for you...




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