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Effective use of ICT in history [2]


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#16 Guest_andy_walker_*

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 01:32 PM

Thanks Andy.

Good point about the buttons. I must admit I am still getting fully to grips with the Hot Potatoes stuff, and each time I do a new exercise I get a bit better at it. I shall go back to the exercises and delete the unecessary buttons when I get time.

As a general point to anyone reading though, I would say that the Hot Potatoes stuff is an excellent set of tools for doing this kind of thing. After we start new budgets again in April, I intend to buy a selection of the Content Generator applications and use these with the Hot Potatoes stuff to enhance the lessons for the summer term even further.

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Agreed about hot spuds - a fantastic tool and pretty simple to use.
Once you have come to terms with the the navigation options you can start to build up a series of activities covering a range of skills/activities at different ability levels. You can also link to existing learning objects published externally. This is something I frequently do :lol:
Here is an example of a lesson for Year 10 on Roman Medicine.
And here is one about Medieval medicine

Hot spuds is also very useful for literacy work (literacy is a significant barrier to learning in the school I work in). Word games and quizzes can be used in association with your existing resources to get pupils to use key words fluently and with understanding.
A Hot Potatoes created lesson for Year 7can be found here along with lesson plan (I admit to writing them sometimes :lol: )

#17 James Potter

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 03:37 PM

My 'effective use of ICT in history' project at present is putting all of the schemes of work on our website complete with ALL resources linked in. It takes ages to do, but I think it's effective use of ICT for these reasons:

It makes planning easier me, other teachers and supply/cover teachers who find themselves taking history, as everything is pretty clearly laid out.

It makes it easy for the students to go online and view what they are doing in the next lesson/week/month, and it gives them the resources to download if they want to practice them.

It's good for parents as they can clearly see what their child is currently studying at any given time.

If a student is absent for any lengh of time I can email the link of the page with the resources that they need to complete the work they have missed.

The scheme of work is not just limited to worksheets, I have also linked video, audio and flash based activities in.

I think also that if I ever get a laptop classroom (gazing into the crystal ball and crossing all of my fingers), the set up would be ideal for use.

Please feel free to have a look at it all. Click the signature at the bottom to link to the webpage and then click on the year 5/6/7 and 8 links on the home page. I generally update it at least once a week. The best examples of the above are probably the year 7 and 8 links at present.

Thanks!

James

#18 Russel Tarr

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Posted 05 February 2005 - 05:05 PM

ICT should only be used in the history classroom if it is positively adding something to the teaching and learning experience. It is really easy to fall into the trap of thinking that if computers are being used, the lesson is somehow "better".

I've been using ICT in the classroom now for 7 years or so, and some of the most effective activities are still some of the simplest ones which I created in my NQT year.

Here's one example using Word - my very first foray into History and ICT!
1. Teacher writes a dry factual account of a key event (e.g. murder of Becket)
2. Students are put into two groups - those for Becket, and those for Henry II.
3. Their task is to open it the document and turn it into a biased, partisan account by
(a) Adding adjectives ("evil","nasty","wonderful","brave")
(B) Removing unwelcome facts (e.g. students in favour of Henry II would edit out the fact that his knights smear Becket's brains over the floor).
4. What they CANNOT do is change any facts (e.g. by stating that Becket struck the knights first) - this raises the whole issue of the difference between facts and opinions.

I always start the lesson by brainstorming up some "good" and "bad" adjectives in two columns on the board to give help to the weaker students, and I have always been impressed with how effectively such a simple lesson gets across ideas of bias, propaganda, censorship, fact v. opinion.

In a subsequent lesson, get two students from the opposing teams to read out their versions of events. What are the facts they agree on? What are the opinions which they differ on?

One final tip - if a student uses a particular word too much in their account (the "brave" knights often make several appearances, despite the list on the board!) get them to click their mouse on the word, then press SHIFT+F7, which activates the thesaurus. If they use this, get them to put a definitions list at the bottom to help them explain the meaning of this fresh vocabulary.

"There's an old saying about those who forget history. I don't remember it, but it's good" - Stephen Colbert

#19 Andrew Field

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Posted 07 February 2005 - 11:32 PM

Another area to consider is the potential of PowerPoint. Firstly begin by removing all thoughts of students standing at the front delivering a lecture accompanied by PowerPoint.

Instead, thing about how students can use PowerPoint for historical analysis and ideas.

One really simple area would be to create a graph showing the propensity of Civil War breaking out. Provide students with a pre-prepared slideshow with about 10 slides. One each slide provide students with a description of relations between Charles and Parliament. Make sure these are all mixed up.

In this example students can use PowerPoint to:
  • Very quickly arrange these into chronological order by dragging and dropping the slides using the slide sorter view - 5 minute task
  • Then get students to come up with their own 'representation' shape. For example - a simple rectangle.
  • Students then copy and paste this rectangle into each slide. Each time they need to consider the impact of the event - if it made Civil War more likely they stretch their shape up, if less likely they stretch they shape down.
  • Colour - as well as shape - can be used too - one colour to show worsening relations, another for improving relations.
  • Once complete, students can go back and add an explanation for the shape they created.
  • Students can then automate the presentation to provide an interactive graphical representation of the outbreak of the Civil War.
Posted Image

This kind of thing can be adapted no end. It is also really simple ICT - we are moving text about and drawing shapes. :woo:

PowerPoint, when we stop thinking it as a presentational tool, has a multitude of uses for history teachers.


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#20 Russel Tarr

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 10:53 AM

One of the teachers in my department had a great idea for a lesson using PowerPoint. She constructed a series of slides just containing pictures of the Great War; she put these on a timer so they changed every 15 seconds or so to create a "movie".

She played this once with a very sombre piece of music in the background (some classical dirge of some sort - sorry, I'm a complete oik about that sort of thing) and asked them what impression of the war they had got from this.

She then played it again using a very different soundtrack (e.g. Edwin Starr's War, or Rage Against the Machine's "Killing in the Name of" or Country Joe McDonald's "Feel Like I'm Fixin' to Die Rag") and then asked which soundtrack worked best, and why.

"There's an old saying about those who forget history. I don't remember it, but it's good" - Stephen Colbert

#21 Andrew Field

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 06:49 PM

Sticking with PowerPoint another infinitely adaptable technique is to give student a pre-prepared 'argument' slides.

Divide the slide down the middle and then add words 'For' and 'Against'. Complete one side of the argument.

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You can then get students to respond to each argument in turn. They add their ideas to the opposide side.

You can divide the class into two. Giving one side 'For' arguments to respond to and giving the other 'Against' arguments to respond to.

A specific example would be to investigate the dropping of the Atomic Bomb. You provide students with a loaded key statement e.g. "The allies were fully justified in droppoing the bomb" with a full range of sources. Students can then be given one side of the arguments which they have to respond to accordingly.

As they are using the computer they can handle a great deal more information, can go back and edit sections later and consequently develop far more effective ideas. Here again it is a simple use of ICT as a tool for effective history.

You can see this lesson in practice on the recent 'Embedding ICT @ history' CD-Rom.


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#22 Guest_andy_walker_*

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Posted 08 February 2005 - 11:25 PM

The fact that Andy has brought up the concept of differentiation is particularly significant.  Just as with a worksheet that you create using the computer, games and quizzes can be differentiated.  This does take a little more thought and planning but is well worth the time.  You just edit your questions and save the file with a different name - you then have two versions of the same activity, effectively differentiated.


This wasn't actually what I had in mind regarding differentiation. I was thinking more that in the arena of an online lesson it is quite easy to build in foundation and extension work.
Students tackle well paced tasks at their own level with none of the social stigma of being given a separate sheet or being put in a separate set.

#23 Andrew Field

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 08:39 AM

This wasn't actually what I had in mind regarding differentiation. I was thinking more that in the arena of an online lesson it is quite easy to build in foundation and extension work.
Students tackle well paced tasks at their own level with none of the social stigma of being given a separate sheet or being put in a separate set.

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Interesting point. What I find works well is to have differentiated versions of activities and then letting students select which one they feel is most appropriate. I do feel there is a need to add an additional level of challenge to many activities. As things are ICT based it is easy to change them around in the light of experience with the students.

For some students I'd want to use a simple quiz or matching activity to engage them immediately, whereas I would jump to a later stage with more able students. Here tasks can be adapted accordingly.

For games and quizzes the issue isn't as relevant, aside from a desire to make questions accessible yet challenging. With more developed activities such as the ones I've mentioned using PowerPoint it would be advantageous to offer differentiated resources.

As you say though, with foundation and extension tasks effectively included in lessons the differentation by task is naturally built in.


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#24 alf wilkinson

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 07:24 PM

Ben Walsh's book 'Exciting ICT in History' by Network Press has been published and I have read it. It contains lots of practical, down to earth, useable examples for ICT in the history classroom. And all the examples in the book are on the CD-ROM included, so you can try them yourselves, or modify them to suit your classes. You can finda review of the book on www.burntcakes.com under 'history text reviews' http://www.burntcake...iew_345_ht.html. Now you have no excuse for not embedding ICT in your teaching!
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#25 Andrew Field

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Posted 09 February 2005 - 07:44 PM

Ben Walsh's book 'Exciting ICT in History' by Network Press has been published and I have read it. It contains lots of practical, down to earth, useable examples for ICT in the history classroom. And all the examples in the book are on the CD-ROM included, so you can try them yourselves, or modify them to suit your classes. You can finda review of the book on www.burntcakes.com under 'history text reviews' http://www.burntcake...iew_345_ht.html. Now you have no excuse for not embedding ICT in your teaching!

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As I said previously in the thread though, despite it saying it was published on the 12th January the Amazon link states that it hasn't been published. :(

It is on the Publisher's website - http://www.networkpr...CT_History.html - but little information about purchasing.

Whilst this issue isn't strictly relevant to this seminar, Ben's book appears to put forward exactly the sorts of things that this seminar is encouraging - practical exercises that can easily slot into a department's teaching. I hope Amazon get themselves sorted so it can be ordered!

The contents look very useful indeed:

Foreword
Author’s Acknowledgements
Preface
A forward vision
A cunning plan? The learning package
From vicious Vikings to incisive interpretations
Dynamic data handling
Dare to ask ‘Is the internet a valuable resource?’
Interactivity and authoring: Joined up history and ICT
Digital video in the history classroom
Getting help and support
Recommended reading




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#26 alf wilkinson

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 09:18 AM

Many of the examples in this thread are very simple, low-tech ICT, where the emphasis is on history teaching and learning. It is easy, when you have access to the equipment, to be seduced into ICT for the sake of it. Digital video editing with kids is fun, for example, but in itself it is not good history teaching and learning. It is the use made of the process and the product that helps 'learn' history.

Edited by alf wilkinson, 10 February 2005 - 09:22 AM.

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#27 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 10 February 2005 - 09:51 AM

Digital video editing with kids is fun, for example, but in itself it is not good history teaching and learning. It is the use made of the process and the product that helps 'learn' history.

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Alf is right here. In many cases using digital video and editing it really is just about bells and whistles rather than hitting historical skills. One example of digital video usage that does focus on history teaching and learning is Film Education's First Day on the Somme. Here the clips are already prepared for pupils, along with sound files and photographs. The software enables selection of suitable clips or images and requires the user to think about how to piece them together. Therefore you've got selection of sources for a purpose, development of historical knowledge through associated research and viewing of the clips and a means of developing an understanding of interpretations of the battle. You can set up a few examples for pupils to use as stimulus that aim to glorify war or make it seem futile and pointless. The ICT aspect then becomes a tool rather than the main focus of the lesson as pupils are concentrating more on the content and interpretations than the technical aspects of editing, cropping, clipping etc...

The same is possible using clips that have been gathered within a department - just takes a lot longer to prepare!

Ben Walsh ran a session with G&T pupils in our area yesterday using digital video clips from the film Becket. It will be interesting to see what pupils have learnt in terms of History and / or ICt as a result of the day - I'll post their thoughts and see if I can get Ben to outline what he did when I get around to speaking to them.

#28 Dan Moorhouse

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Posted 25 March 2005 - 01:59 PM

As a slight aside, Ben Walsh is publishing what looks to be an excellent book about 'Exciting ICT in history'.  Obviously I haven't read it yet, but I'm sure it will be excellent.

The Amazon link below says the publication date was January 12, 2005.  However, it also says it hasn't been published yet.

I suspect the actual date of publication is more likely to be January 12, 2006

Posted Image
http://www.amazon.co...7137081-3684640

Book Description
Discover how using ICT tools can turn even routine activities into more powerful learning experiences for all your pupils.
Each book in the series is packed with inspiring ICT projects, from simple activities using word processors to interactive whiteboards through to digital video and 3D animation. The text is illustrated with case studies of some of the most exciting and innovative uses of ICT at KS2-4. A CD-ROM comes with each title, containing all the resources you need to carry out the tasks and activities in the book.


So, if is it 2006 - there's no excuse not to get your ideas in now. Come on - any other ideas....? Everything is welcome - please don't be shy! :unsure:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Its not 2006, its out now and a copy is sat in front of me as I type. The book is excellent and the CD has a range of easy to use resources on it that are editable. Lots of ideas for experienced users of ICT to try out but written in a manner that won't scare off people who are fairly new to using ICT. Ben refers to the forum several times in this publication and has include resources created by several members in the book. I've found the sections on digital video and creating panoramas to be particularly useful already.

Well worth the investment for any department.

#29 Andrew Field

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Posted 27 March 2005 - 09:15 PM

I got sent a free copy that arrived this week too. I would agree entirely - it is an excellent resource that offers some really practical and productive ideas that will help any history department develop further.

Incidentally, I only suggested 2006 because I'd received an e-mail from the publishers late last year saying that was the case. Ordering from Amazon also doesn't appear to be much use - they say

Availability: usually dispatched within 4 to 6 weeks. Please note that titles occasionally go out of print or publishers run out of stock

I'd suggest ordering directly from the publishers:
http://www.networkpr...CT_History.html


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