Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

KS3 2008 curriculum


  • Please log in to reply
131 replies to this topic

#46 Dan Moorhouse

Dan Moorhouse

    Six Star General

  • Admin
  • 3,546 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 11:24 AM

Looks good.

Just to note that the Holocaust isn't the only compulsory element now - Slavery is compulsory as well now. (Though you've got it in, so not a problem...)

#47 Gorbash

Gorbash

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 545 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 11:43 AM

Looks good.

Just to note that the Holocaust isn't the only compulsory element now - Slavery is compulsory as well now. (Though you've got it in, so not a problem...)


Dan,

I thought it was Empire that had become a compulsary component and not slavery per se!

Paul
Its not who I am but what I do which defines me...

#48 Dan Moorhouse

Dan Moorhouse

    Six Star General

  • Admin
  • 3,546 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 11:47 AM

QCA bod said Slavery at the last HA meeting - and the Slave Trade is stated on the new NC site, only specific 'event' other than the Holocaust to be named (I think...) rest are all themes etc. I'll double check...

#49 Tony Fox

Tony Fox

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,302 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 11:50 AM

Br. History: H: the development of trade, colonisation, industrialisation and technology, the British Empire and its impact on different people in Britain and overseas, pre-colonial civilisations, the nature and effects of the slave trade, and resistance and decolonisation.

I read this as 'The Slave Trade' how you put 'Slavery' into your scheme is up to you, personally I cannot see how we can look at abolishing something we have not studied. I think this provides the opportunity to add your Local History element, as you can study local involvement in the slave trade and or the campaign against it, without spending lots of time in the Plantations.

Edited by Tony Fox, 21 February 2008 - 11:55 AM.

"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr

#50 Dan Moorhouse

Dan Moorhouse

    Six Star General

  • Admin
  • 3,546 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 12:59 PM

From the explanatory notes in the NC.

The development of trade, colonisation, industrialisation and technology,
the British Empire:
This includes studying how the development of trade,
colonisation, industrialisation and technology affected the UK. There
should be a focus on the British Empire and its effect both on Britain and
on the regions it colonised, as well as its legacy in the contemporary
world (eg in Africa, the Middle East and India). Recognition should also be
given to the cultures, beliefs and achievements of some of the societies
prior to European colonisation, such as the West African kingdoms. The
study of the slave trade should include resistance, the abolition of slavery
and the work of people such as Olaudah Equiano and William Wilberforce.

Links could be made to emancipation, segregation and the twentiethcentury
civil rights movement in the USA.




Simple distinction between things that should be done and could be done. Those that should... we have to do...

So content wise, the 'must do' bits are Empire, Slavery and, if my reading of the document is correct, these bits as well:

Pupils should explore cultural, ethnic and religious diversity and racial equality.

Examples should include: the changing relationship between
the crown and parliament; the nature and motives of protest over time;
the historical origins and development of the British constitution; and
the development of democracy.



The different histories and changing relationships through time of the
peoples of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales: This includes studying
the histories of the different parts of the British Isles and their impact on
each other, and developing an understanding of the historical origins of
the UK.



This includes studying the causes and consequences
of various conflicts, including the two world wars, the Holocaust and
other genocides. Pupils should develop an understanding of the changing
nature of conflict over time and attempts to resolve conflict and develop
cooperation, including through international institutions such as the
United Nations and the European Union.



#51 JenniferJames

JenniferJames

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 494 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 09:54 PM

We started to look at this in INSET on first day back this half term. I confess that I am a bit 'stone age' too!
Our kids REALLY struggle with chronology as it is, and I like getting absorbed into one period.
I enjoy teaching Medieval Realms, Making of UK, Industrial Rev & WWI &II. Kids seem to love it and have never challenged 'relevance' (I teach in a school which is about 70% Asian). I will struggle to change our SoW to such a 'Citizenship' based 'Modern' scheme.
Loads of people seem to love the modern world stuff on here! I think I'm in the minority. Love doing majority British History and I sound like a right wing crazy!
J

#52 Gorbash

Gorbash

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 545 posts

Posted 21 February 2008 - 10:03 PM

Loads of people seem to love the modern world stuff on here!


Don't worry I'm not one of them...I'm a medievalist / early modern fan. Get me past about 1660 and I begin to struggle...makes a joke of me teaching 1920-1940 America at A Level.

There is no need to go for the thematic approach that I seem to be plumping for. Providing you can tick the all the necessary boxes it doesn't matter how you deliver it.

Do what you feel (in your professional judgement!) is right for your pupils in your school and everybody on this board would back you in whatever you decide to do.

Paul
Its not who I am but what I do which defines me...

#53 Chris Garratt

Chris Garratt

    Long-term Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 598 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 02:47 PM

I asked a question about themes above as I, too, think wholesale is too much for myself and the kids.

What I've done is plumped for a few thematic studies (e.g leisure and empire) that span many centuries and then generally tackled the themes within chronological blocks. My final basic oultine is below.

Attached Files


All I ask for is the chance to prove that money won't make me happy. Spike Milligan

#54 JenniferJames

JenniferJames

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 494 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 07:17 PM

Thanks!
Sometimes I feel like a total thicky! For a History teacher, my understanding of (and interest in) Politics is shaky to say the least. Sometimes I feel like I'm only pretending to be a History teacher!
J

#55 Tony Fox

Tony Fox

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,302 posts

Posted 22 February 2008 - 09:11 PM

There is no need to go for the thematic approach that I seem to be plumping for. Providing you can tick the all the necessary boxes it doesn't matter how you deliver it.


I agree, try not to get too hung up, as we really have two years to experiment.
I like the idea that the themes can be implicit rather than explicit, thus I can put in what I want, then think about how to link it, rather than put in what we 'must' teach.
"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr

#56 Lesley Ann

Lesley Ann

    Six Star General

  • Admin
  • 2,496 posts

Posted 25 February 2008 - 10:29 AM

So content wise, the 'must do' bits are Empire, Slavery and, if my reading of the document is correct, these bits as well:


In addition to the other must do bits.....is this another one?

British history
f. the impact through time of the movement and settlement of diverse peoples to, from and within the British Isles

The impact through time of the movement and settlement of diverse peoples to, from and within the British Isles: This includes studying the wide cultural, social and ethnic diversity of Britain from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century and how this has helped shape Britainís identity; and developing an understanding of the part played by internal and external migration in Britainís development, including the experience of key individuals. Examples should help pupils reach an informed understanding of, and respect for, their own and each otherís identities. This can be linked with the study in citizenship of reasons for the recent migration to, from and within the UK.



I'm on my PD ED Balls day....in a dept of me......trying to get head around the must do to! I'm sure the old curriculum document was much clearer on the must do bits than this one....

I've put the new document into word so far....and highlighted the must do in italic...have I missed anything else?

Attached Files


Carpe Diem - Seize the Day

#57 NeilM

NeilM

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts

Posted 26 February 2008 - 07:41 PM

Hi

I am really struggling with fully meeting all the 08 requirements. I long ago implemented a properly chronological, and skills-based Scheme at KS3. This is staying.

The nod to 08 is that I am 'bracketting' this Scheme with the attached Units for 1st term Y7 and last term Y9, which is taught thematically to unite everything in the middle.

However I can't get it to quite work!! The Y7 isn't quite interesting enough, and the Y9 is definitely going to be difficult to resource, and I'm not sure its any good at all....

Anyone who'd be willing to cast an expert (critical) eye would be most welcome to do so.

Cheers

Attached Files


NeilM

Life is an elaborate metaphor for Cricket.

We are at times too ready to believe that the present is the only possible state of things Marcel Proust (1871-1922)
The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new lands, but in seeing with new eyes. Marcel Proust,


#58 Tony Fox

Tony Fox

    Super Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,302 posts

Posted 05 March 2008 - 02:49 PM

I discussed this idea with an advisor, and I like the framework, it has helped me focus on the key aspects of my planning.
I may need some help on the Learning outcomes though.
I hope this will be useful.

Attached Files


"A parent can bring a child into this world, but a child can bring a parent into the world to come." - from the Talmud

"Had Churchill been a stable and equable man, he could never have inspired the nation. In 1940, when all the odds were against Britain, a leader of sober judgement might well have concluded we were finished. - Anthony Storr

#59 Lesley Ann

Lesley Ann

    Six Star General

  • Admin
  • 2,496 posts

Posted 24 March 2008 - 08:40 PM

Finished my KS3 PoS overview a few weeks ago:

I REALLY wanted to be more adventurous and go down a much more thematic approach....however practicalities kind of got in the wayÖ.and I've had to take a broadly chronological approach.
1. only history specialist in the school to make the new changes happen
2. lack of new funding to buy new resources to support changes
3. mountains of current resources for ability differentiated SEN, EAL, GnT /reading ages etc ...

anyway for what it is worth I'll toss my offering into the ring...

Attached Files


Carpe Diem - Seize the Day

#60 johnwayne

johnwayne

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 387 posts

Posted 24 March 2008 - 09:07 PM

Fantastic - and food for thought! will also probably keep to a chronological approach - mainly due to resources and build upon what we currently have. Many thanks!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users