Jump to content


Photo

Casualty Clearing Station In Ww1


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Evelina

Evelina
  • Student
  • 6 posts

Posted 26 November 2004 - 05:58 PM

I need some informations about CCS,especially those near the Somme battlefield. How were they structured(tents or real biuldings),how far were them from frontline,what kind of treatment did soldiers receive and how long could they actually stay there? Thanks to anyone who can help,this is very importante!

#2 Mrs Faithorn

Mrs Faithorn
  • Moderating Teacher
  • 2,803 posts

Posted 26 November 2004 - 06:18 PM

I think you should find the following links helpful:

'A Casualty Clearing Station' - a memoir by Dr. John A. Hayward [John A. Hayward. M.D., F.R.C.S. 1914-1915. Assistant-Surgeon (rank. Captain) British Red Cross Hospital, Netley. 1915-1917, Medical Officer, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Roehampton. April to November 1918, Temporary Captain R.A.M.C., B.E.F.

First published in Everyman at War (1930), edited by C. B. Purdom.]. This would seem to answer most of your questions.

Some basic information together with interesting source material (personal memories)

If you need more information then I suggest you use a search engine and search terms "Casualty Clearing Station" +"First World War". This is how I found the links above and there were quite a lot more hits.

#3 Evelina

Evelina
  • Student
  • 6 posts

Posted 26 November 2004 - 06:23 PM

Thanks...I am going srtaight to check these links.I am not very good in using the search engines,but let's try!

#4 Mrs Faithorn

Mrs Faithorn
  • Moderating Teacher
  • 2,803 posts

Posted 26 November 2004 - 08:14 PM

Thanks...I am going srtaight to check these links.I am not very good in using the search engines,but let's try!

View Post


If you do need to search for more information then (in the case of your query about CCSs), go to:
Google and in the Search box type "Casualty Clearing Station" "First World War". Putting the phrases you want to find inside inverted commas (" ...") makes sure that you get hits which include the whole phrase rather than the individual words.

This is a general rule which you can apply to other things you might wish to find out.

Anyway ..... I think the first link I gave in my first message included much of what you wanted to know.

#5 Evelina

Evelina
  • Student
  • 6 posts

Posted 27 November 2004 - 02:35 PM

I found many interesting things on those 2 links;I also found this website (www.1914-1918.net/wounded.htm) wich contains a lot of informations. I have a more complete view now!

#6 Mrs Faithorn

Mrs Faithorn
  • Moderating Teacher
  • 2,803 posts

Posted 27 November 2004 - 02:42 PM

Well that is good to hear ...... not only that the sites I mentioned proved helpful but that you were also able to find information yourself.

Unfortunately the link you provided leads to an error message and the site doesn't seem to exist. Do you think you could check again and post the correct address please? If it's a good site it would be useful for us in future and for other people reading this thread too.

#7 Evelina

Evelina
  • Student
  • 6 posts

Posted 27 November 2004 - 04:20 PM

http://www.1914-1918.net/wounded.htm
That's the correct one,i put a com instead of a net!
This page gives links to other pages about the same topic!

#8 Mrs Faithorn

Mrs Faithorn
  • Moderating Teacher
  • 2,803 posts

Posted 27 November 2004 - 05:44 PM

Excellent! Thank you very much Evelina.

I have actually seen this site before, but had forgotten about it.

The good thing is (as I said before) that you have now learned more about how you can find things out for yourself.

#9 A Finemess

A Finemess
  • Moderating Teacher
  • 170 posts

Posted 28 November 2004 - 12:34 PM

One of the most famous of these is at Essex Farm cemetery near Ypres.

I did a Google search on Essex Farm cemetery + casualty clearing station and came up with ...

http://www.reigate.a...lds/battle7.htm

among others.

#10 Mr. D. Bryant

Mr. D. Bryant
  • Moderating Teacher & Admin
  • 1,086 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hertfordshire
  • Interests:History teacher, with special interest in military history.

Posted 17 October 2011 - 04:24 PM

I need some informations about CCS,especially those near the Somme battlefield. How were they structured(tents or real biuldings),how far were them from frontline,what kind of treatment did soldiers receive and how long could they actually stay there? Thanks to anyone who can help,this is very importante!


Just to consolidate some of the information, here is a brief summary re. the C.C.S. (Casualty Clearing Station) and what happened to wounded British soldiers.

Wounded soldiers dressed their own wounds (if possible) and then either made their own way back to their lines, or stretcher-bearers collected them. Soldiers in an attack were under orders not to stop and help their comrades, as this would slow down the advance. Sometimes the wounded would have to wait a long time; some soldiers died waiting. At the Regimental Aid Post (R.A.P.) wounded soldiers were given first aid and, rarely, emergency amputations. Anything more complicated waited until the wounded man reached the C.C.S. which would generally be a few miles behind the lines, out of range of the enemy artillery.

The aim at the C.C.S. was to move casualties on, not to keep them there for a long time. Lightly wounded soldiers would be patched up so they could return to duty. More heavily wounded soldiers would be stabilised and then sent up the Line to Base Hospitals or, often, evacuated back to Britain if their wound was sufficiently serious (A 'Blighty one'). If they could not be moved, they would stay at the C.C.S. until they improved or, usually, died. Many Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries are found on the site of a C.C.S. or an Advanced Dressing Station (A.D.S.), Essex Farm A.D.S. being the most famous example. Wooden huts would mainly have been used for operating theatres and wards, later supplemented by metal huts (perhaps of the Nissen type). However, some areas, e.g. accomodation for nurses, would have been tents.

As well as the other links given, there is a list of the C.C.S.s by number and location on the Long, Long Trail site here. An very detailed account of life as a surgeon at a C.C.S. in France in 1918 can be found on this page from the First World War.com site. The Spartacus Schoolnet page on First World War casualties here includes quotations.

Edited by Mr. D. Bryant, 31 October 2011 - 10:45 PM.
Add reference to First World War.com





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users