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#1 oilcan

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 02:47 PM

I have started revising for my GCSEs in the Easter holidays, and I don't know how I am going to revise everything! I have 4 school books to revise, and the school has given us a booklet with past papers in, but the school revision guide which comes with it isn't very good.

I answer essay questions, and read my books, but I don't know whether I am going to revise everything before my exam.

Even though I enjoy History, and do well in History (I got 96% in my mock), I am worried that I won't get everything done.

So, any tips on how to revise History, e.g a topic at a time? a time period?

Thanks!

#2 Mr Field

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 02:54 PM

Well, firstly explore some of the guidance that already exists in this forum. Have a good look through this section - expecially the post that offers lots of guidance and advice: http://www.schoolhis...p?showtopic=918

It certainly sounds like you are doing well already - I suggest the best thing to do is to put together a clear revision plan that covers all aspects of your course. Cover each topic, and subdivide the topics into key questions.

Have a look through the link above and then post again if you need more help :)

#3 Miss Buxton

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 05:59 PM

It often feels daunting when you must revisit 18 months of a course in the next few weeks - BUT it is not something to get too worked up about.......somewhere in your brain you have covered and absorbed this information and you must now find away of bringing this information back.......that is why we revise.....so I ask my students to work from what they can recall and build on it to revision:

You will need a copy of your exam syllabus and some plain paper, a pencil (colours) and a textbook.

I asked my students to write a mind map on each topic they need to cover for their exam............so on landscape plain paper I asked them to write the KEY QUESTION...with the points the exam board want them to know branching from the key question.............then WITHOUT books/notes I asked them to jot down what they could recall, in words/pics......................after a few minutes they could look at their books.........some where amazed at how much they COULD recall.......they used this as the first step in their revision programme.........they could now go off and revisit the knowledge they needed for the exam....adding to their digram.................THEN they could test themselves later by drawing a new diagram........seeing how much they can recall.

#4 oilcan

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 06:25 PM

Dear Miss Buxton and Mr Field.
Thankyou very much for your replies. :). I tend to get very panicky over any exam, and you have calmed me down!!!

Thankyou for the thread link, it did help me, nice to know that I am not the only one who needs help!! :)

When I next revise History, I'll do a detailed plan of what I need to revise, I can use the topics in my revision guide to help me. I don't have a text book, but I can ask my History teacher if I could borrow one, she is a lovely teacher and I am sure I could borrow one.

I think I feel panicky because I need to remember 2 years worth of information for about 9 subjects, and the results of my GCSEs could decide my future. Although I am expected to get A or more in every subject, it doesn't make me feel any more confident, and I want to go into the exam as confident as possible. I should think I will also be less nervous when I find out whether revision sessions after school are scheduled.

I like mind maps, I do do them for other subjects but haven't done them for History. When I revise, I also the next day, week and month have a quick recap of the things I revised before so it sticks in my head.

Thankyou again for your replies in such a short space of time!

Enjoy the rest of the Easter break,

Oilcan

#5 Miss Buxton

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 06:39 PM

A really good revision timetable will help you organise your time.

Create a calendar on your PC of days left till exams.....

Create a weekly timetable from the time you get in from school....work out how much time to spend on each subject per night........but most importantly BUILD in time for relaxing. Spend 1 hour intense revision..........15 mins break......(1 hour staring at a book or PC does not mean intense revision ;) :lol: I mean reading, making notes, diagrams, turn notes into questions.)

http://www.schoolhis...co.uk/revision/

http://www.schoolhis.../medicine.shtml

http://www.schoolhis...sion/west.shtml


When you ask your teacher about a textbook ask for a title of a GOOD revision guide to invest in AND some past exam papers........try past exam questions and ask your teacher nicely if she will mark it. Keep working and focused and you will do well in all your exams.

Have a good holiday
Miss Buxton

#6 steffi1040

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 06:47 PM

At our school we got told that you should revise in about 40 mins slots as that is when your concentration is at its highest
thought this might help you as it did me.

good luck

#7 Miss Buxton

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Posted 28 March 2005 - 07:34 PM

At our school we got told that you should revise in about 40 mins slots as that is when your concentration is at its highest
thought this might help you as it did me.

good luck

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Excellent advice Steffi.....40 minutes slots is optimum for revision..............

Other advice for your brain............ Just as an athlete needs to follow a regime to reach their peak fitness so your brain also needs a regime to reach its full potential.

Get plenty of sleep. Your brain needs time to sort out the information it has come across during the day.

Drink lots of water. The brain is made mostly of water and dehydration will lead to headaches and tiredness.

Eat a balanced diet. The brain needs a balanced diet, so eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – ‘brain food’

Exercise your body. The brain uses 20% of oxygen in the blood so you need to think about your posture and exercise to make sure your body gets enough.

Exercise your mind. Just like muscles need to be stretched and worked so does the mind – use brain gyms, puzzles etc.

Avoid too much . . . Try to avoid too much chocolate, alcohol, coke, caffeine and foods with lots of additives. These substances interfere with the way your brain functions.

#8 oilcan

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 05:55 PM

Ah! I am sorry I haven't replied sooner, I didn't get a message that anybody had replied and only checked back today.

I have made a revision timetable, each night I study 3 subjects, and have made a timetable which goes right until the end of my exams. I am hoping that there will be some revision sessions at school. I have a CPG revision guide which people do recommend and a school one. With the school revision guide comes a task booklet which contains a lot of past questions, so I am ok on that front.

I did used to do a lot of netball every week but now the season is over, so I may go swimming sometime (don't know when or where, I am too busy!) But I still have PE lessons.

Oh dear, I am such a chocoholic, but don't really eat the other foods you mentioned. I will try not to eat so much!

Our school is useless in helping us revise, they tell us to but not how, why, when etc. I do work for short amounts of time and do have a lot of breaks.

Thanks for your replies :D

#9 Miss Buxton

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 09:08 PM

Good luck with your revision..... :D




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