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Edexcel Past Papers


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#1 vt007

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 05:04 PM

I've looked on the Edexcel website for past papers for History (Modern History - India/USA...) but there's only one paper from last year! And I did that paper in the mocks. Is there any way I would be able to get any further Edexcel past papers?

Ooo and I've got the History Paper 1 exam next week, any tips on India (1900-49) and USA (1941-80) which would be useful?

What are like the main things that us pupils usually miss out on which could potentially give us the higher marks (i.e. A/A*)

Thanks for anyone who can help!

#2 Mrs Faithorn

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 05:46 PM

I've looked on the Edexcel website for past papers for History (Modern History - India/USA...) but there's only one paper from last year! And I did that paper in the mocks. Is there any way I would be able to get any further Edexcel past papers?


N.B. THE INFORMATION BELOW IS OUT OF DATE. SEE THIS THREAD.

[The only way you are going to get more Edexcel Past Papers is from your own teacher (and it's holidays so not very likely) or from the Edexcel Publications Office. I've just checked their site and you can buy a small selection of their Exam Papers online as downloadable files. You'll need one of your parents to do that using a credit or debit card, but I guess it's worth a try?. They are £1.99 each but there only seems to be Papers 1 and 2 for Summer 2004 and 2005 there. However, you get the exam paper, an answer sheet and the examiner's report for that which sounds quite a good deal to me.

See here:
http://shop.edexcel....y&category=GCSE
You want History A (not the 'short course' option)]

All Exam Boards question papers are copyright which means that other people are not allowed to put them on their web sites. Sorry.

Ooo and I've got the History Paper 1 exam next week, any tips on India (1900-49) and USA (1941-80) which would be useful?

What are like the main things that us pupils usually miss out on which could potentially give us the higher marks (i.e. A/A*)

Thanks for anyone who can help!


I don't teach this myself, but I'll try to find another teacher who can offer specific help, so check back here again.

In the meantime have a read of the Examiner's Report for Summer 2005
http://www.edexcel.o...__rep_sum05.pdf

If you've got the 2005 Papers then you'll have the questions. You'll need to be careful to pick the right sections, though I don't think you should have any difficulty with that. Do remember that this is written mainly for teachers, not students, though.

If you are aiming for a top grade, then (whatever Exam Board or topics studied) you need to:
1. Do well on both the papers
2. Always focus really clearly on the questions actually asked (not what you wish they were ;) )
3. Avoid writing descriptive accounts of events, and ALWAYS, ALWAYS, ALWAYS explain your answer.
4. Make sure you read the instructions carefully so that you answer the required number of questions and use the right sources. You have no idea how many candidates don't do that!
5. Keep a careful eye on the clock and try not to run out of time. Use the number of marks allotted for each question as a guide as to how much to write and make sure you leave enough time for the questions with the most marks. Far too many candidates write far too much for the earlier questions carrying fewer marks and then rush the longer questions/don't finish properly.

I hope this helps, but as I said - check back again to see if I have found someone who teaches Edexcel +your options.

Edited by Mr. D. Bryant, 03 January 2012 - 05:47 PM.
Add relevant link.


#3 Mrs Faithorn

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 07:45 PM

What follows is from a teacher who does this course. She sent me a message saying:

For Edexcel USA the pupil needs to be very clear about the dates that the questions refer to. This is especially important for the civil rights movement, because it is all too easy to waste time talking about Brown-v-Topeka in a question about the 1960's and losing marks accordingly. The pupil also needs to make sure that they don't write too generally - e.g. on the women's or student movement - get specific facts in. Another tip I give my pupils is to take time to choose which of the two sets of questions they want to answer on each paper - don't just look at the questions at the start, with the lower amounts of marks, check out the longer answers at the end with the 12 marks - which set of questions can you get the most marks on? Also, once you have chosen your set of questions check if there are any dates/key facts being given away in the other set of questions, that you can use!

PAPER 2

For paper 2 in the first source question the student should look to draw at least two inferences from source A and back them up with quotations from the source. Whatever they do they must not copy the source out.

For the second question the marks are for comparing source C to sources A and B. There are no marks for comparing B to C! They should find 2-3 issues that arise from the sources and compare what C says on them to what sources A and B say.

The third source question is how useful are sources D and E and they should look at each source independently - there are no marks for comparing them. They need to say first of all how the content makes the source useful and any limitations of the content. Then they need to think about the nature, origin and purpose of the source and how this affects its usefulness.

The final question is basically an essay. The pupils should not just trot through each of the sources, they have to use the sources to discuss what they think about the statement they are given - e.g. 'Tanks were a decisive weapon in the final battles of the first world war' Use the sources and your own knowledge to explain whether you agree with this view. I tell my pupils to turn the statement into a question and then decide which sources agree and disagree with the question. They then need to write an answer to this question, using the sources and discussing how they agree/disagree with the queston. On the course I went on the examiner advised people to start with source F, as this was the only source they would not have looked at when they started question 4. N.B Candidates can only get to the higher levels for question 4 if they use their own knowledge.


I'm still waiting to hear from anyone who may teach India 1900 - 1947, but much of the advice given here is general and can be applied to any topic.

#4 vt007

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 02:54 PM

Thank you VERY much for your help! On both posts! Seriously you've given me some pretty good links! It sucks that they theres not many resources for India, but I'll ask my teacher anyway. Thanks again! LIFESAVER!! :D

#5 Mrs Faithorn

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 06:45 PM

Pleased to help and Good Luck with your GCSEs!

If you have any further questions do post again.

#6 Mr Field

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 07:16 PM

Ooo and I've got the History Paper 1 exam next week, any tips on India (1900-49) and USA (1941-80) which would be useful?

What are like the main things that us pupils usually miss out on which could potentially give us the higher marks (i.e. A/A*)

Thanks for anyone who can help!


There are lots of activities that I've created to support the USA (1941-80) course - known as Divided Union. The best one is the practice paper application - here you can test yourself with practice questions that may well come up next Friday.

Look here: http://www.schoolhis...paper_usa.shtml
and http://www.schoolhis...sadivided.shtml




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