Jump to content


Photo

How Did Trench Warfare Change Owen's Views Of World War 1?


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 England-1966

England-1966
  • Student
  • 6 posts

Posted 17 December 2006 - 12:14 PM

How did trench warfare change wilfred's owen views of world war ?

Can you give me war quotes and what they mean.

Thanks England 1966

#2 Mr Wright

Mr Wright
  • Moderating Teacher
  • 34 posts

Posted 17 December 2006 - 07:22 PM

How did trench warfare change wilfred's owen views of world war ?

Can you give me war quotes and what they mean.

Thanks England 1966


Politeness in the form of a "Please" or "I would appreciate it if ..." costs nothing.

That said, this does seem to be a very broad request and quite difficult tp give assistance without actually teaching a lesson!

This page gives you an overview of Owen's life and work.

This document shows a poem written by Owen when he was in hospital in Edinburgh.

If you read it carefully, you will see that the poem gives a very vivid and horrible picture of the effects of gas poisoning on soldiers. Almost like a nightmare. Try selecting a few quotes from the poem yourself to show this.

#3 Mr. D. Bryant

Mr. D. Bryant
  • Moderating Teacher & Admin
  • 1,069 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hertfordshire
  • Interests:History teacher, with special interest in military history.

Posted 11 October 2011 - 09:43 AM

How did trench warfare change wilfred's owen views of world war ?


Just to supplement the answer already given, here is some additional information.

The Wilfred Owen Association website has a lot of information on Owen. This page on Owen the poet argues that until Owen met Siegfried Sassoon in August 1917 his views on the war were relatively conventional, seeing it as a 'just cause'. Sassoon encouraged him to change his position and view as the war as being fought for the wrong aims.

However, as Owen matured as a poet his point of view continued to change, coming to focus on 'the pity of war':

My subject is War, and the pity of War.

The Poetry is in the pity.


(see his draft Preface to a proposed collection of war poems).

Dominic Hibberd (who wrote the piece on 'Owen the poet') argues that Owen and Sassoon were atypical in their opposition to the war in 1917. He believes that Owen's attitude continued to develop until his death.

Remember, Owen asked to return to active service in 1918 when he could have stayed in safety.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users