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How Did Hitler Improve Germany?


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#1 footy99

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 12:48 PM

The only ways that I can seem to find at the moment are that he reduced unemployment by creating the autobahns and he re-introduced conscription. Were there any other ways which he improve germany?

#2 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 06:49 PM

The problem is that it's still politically incorrect to credit Hitler with doing ANYTHING good - as soon as you suggest it, you're labelled a Nazi-lover.
Recently, the pop-singer Brian Ferry got into hot water for saying that Nazi iconography was stunning - although all he said was: 'the Nazis knew how to put themselves in the limelight... Leni Riefenstahl's movies, Albert Speer's buildings, the mass parades and the flags - just amazing. Really beautiful'.

The truth, however, is that the Nazis did lots of amazing things.

You'll find some of them if you listen to the BBC podcast: http://www.bbc.co.uk...rmany_au_nb.ram, which balances good against bad in Nazi Germany.

Another balanced view of how Hitler improved Germany can be found here: http://www.johndclar...snotbutter.html

There is a good debate about Brian Ferry's statement on this forum thread.

#3 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 21 June 2007 - 10:01 PM

The 'other thing' turned out to be an amorphous mass of facts accumulated from a trawl through the net and stored for possible future use on a file on my old computer!

I reproduce it below - for what it is worth. It is a mass of pasted/copied facts, listed in no real order.
I make no claims for its validity; remember that you cannot really trust ANY 'fact' you find on the web.

And, above all, I stress that these were the same people who developed the gas chambers and race eugenics. It is FAR too early for a 'what did the Nazis do for us' approach to Nazi history.

But - if you were looking to build a list of how Hitler improved Germany - you would find some ideas in the following:

Statements on the Internet on what the Nazis invented/ contributed to the modern world
Volkswagen
KdF
computer, invented by Konrad Zuse 1941.
Jet plane in 1939 by Heinkel Flugzeugwerke.
The first manned rocket flight in 1945 (unfortunately it lasted only some seconds and pilot Lothar Sieber died)
Nazi doctors, in line with their campaign for public health were the first to write a major scientific paper linking smoking with lung cancer, I believe smoking was even banned, for a brief time in the Luftwaffee.
Nazis invented Nerve gasses Sarin and Tabun.
Invented first effective automatic rifle, single person anti-tank weapons (precursors to RPGs).
You can see some magnificant architecture by Speer that was planned in nearly any documentary on the man.
Autobahns
Stealth technolgy was invented by the Horten brothers during the Reich.
Audio technology using magnetic tape was a Third Reich invention. Copying German tape recorders was how the famous American corporation Ampex got its start. Magnetic tape was also essential later for the video tape recorder. Allies hadn't a clue how the Axis was transmitting speeches and programs hours apart to different locations and having them sound "live." It was top of the list of technologies to capture as the war concluded.
Management systems for keeping massive and complex development programs on track was another "invention" transferred to the US, along with its scientists and project managers. These systems allowed the Germans to have developments underway in numerous categories and perform them remarkably well.
The Wankel engine, which is now referred to as the "rotary engine" was invented during the Third Reich. Mazda uses this engine extensively.

Someone mentioned the Autobahnen as really an idea thought up during the Weimar Republic. Yes, but that brings to light another achievement, and that is simply the will and energy to put unemployed workers to work doing things that needed to be done, something the Weimar government was totally inept at doing. "Parliamentary chaos" combined with acquiescence to WWI reparations were the problems.

Missile technology: Ground-to-ground, air-to-air, air-to-ground, ground-to-air, ship-to-ship, etc., using wire guidance, TV guidance, IR guidance (everything but laser quidance). Most of these missiles were not at the highest form of development, but their work launched and made a bundle of money later on for corporations like Boeing, Raytheon, Hughes Aircraft, North American Aviation (Rocketdyne Div.), etc. All of these companies had their German "Chief Scientist" heading up research and development operations.

The promising IR technologies were mostly all developed during the Third Reich. They had "night vision" devices while the Allies were still wondering if such things were possible.

Modern sewer treatment facilities are all derived from Third Reich technology. You've probably seen them with their settling ponds and huge skimmers.

While the Englishman, Farnsworth, gets credit for the invention of a very rudimentary television, it was the Third Reich that perfected television and conducted the first broadcasting.

Application of geophones for seismic wave detection was used for locating artillary.

The "wishbone cannon" was invented and installed at Calais, France. It was destroyed before it was operable.

The "rail gun" was another significant invention, which the US and SU copied. This weapon employes a series of ring magnets to propell a rail mounted projectile. The significant feature of this "gun" is that it can accelerate the projectile at a speed nearing infinity -- at least in theory. Conventional explosives are limited by their individual, finite rates of expansion and hence constrained in how fast they can make a projectile move.

The intial "invention" of the Third Reich that made everything possible was the breaking away from the international banking system, which made its money on debt finance; i.e., usury. This act was probably the most important event which caused WWII to later occur. In the Thirties the German economy was booming and all sorts of new humane benefits were granted to workers. Elsewhere, deep economic depression was underway, and Roosevelt, for instance, really couldn't get things to moving until we went into a war economy mode.

In all, 300,000 patents and copyrights were expropriated from Germany by the Allies after 1945.

The Fischer-Tropsch process to produce synthetic fuels from coal, which fueled Germany's armed forces throughout the war.

The dicovery of the ingesting of faecal bacteria to cure gut problems
http://www.rense.com/general4/bac.htm

Dr Morell used his Mutaflor to treat Hitler's foul smelling stools. And used today as Symbioflor http://www.biosym.dk..._symbioflor.htm

The chemical enhancing of soldiers' ability to fight
http://www.rense.com...l34/enhance.htm

During the Nazi era, German scientists and engineers either developed or greatly improved television, jet-propelled aircraft (including the ejection seat), guided missiles, electronic computers, the electron microscope, atomic fission, data-processing technologies, pesticides, and, of course, the world's first industrial murder complexes. The first magnetic tape recording was of a speech by Hitler, and the nerve gases Sarin and Tabun were Nazi inventions.

Third Reich scientists also performed extensive work in the area of occupational carcinogenesis. Physicians documented the health hazards of asbestos, and in 1943 Germany became the first nation to recognize lung cancer and mesothelioma caused by asbestos inhalation as compensable occupational illnesses.
Nazi Germany also pioneered what we now call experimental epidemiology: two striking papers -- a 1939 article by Franz H. MŘller of Cologne, and a 1943 paper by Eberhard Schairer and Erich Sch÷niger of Jena -- presented the most convincing demonstrations up to that time that cigarettes were a major cause of lung cancer.

Inflatable sex doll - Dr. Rudolf Chargeheimer, a psychiatrist appointed by Himmler to help develop the prototype, wrote that "the purpose and goal of the dolls is to relieve our soldiers. They have to fight and not to mingle with 'foreign women.'"

The opiate drugs methadone (the heroin substitute) and pethidine (a powerful pain killer) were Nazi inventions.

Our society, in fact Western society in general, absorbed as much of the Nazi technology and social control mechanisms as we could lay our grubby hands on. Turbine engines (the kind on airplanes and in powerplants), modern aircraft designs, rockets, superhighways, propaganda techniques, political manipulation, modern insecticides, nerve gas and audiotape are all Nazi inventions. We didn't invent them, and we weren't working on them at the same time. We took them from the Nazis wholesale (and we were entirely right to do so). Oddly, I'm not hearing anyone getting bent out of shape about the existence of freeways. http://billrushing.org/id169.html

Much of what we know about hypothermia (re-warming techniques and cold-water suits) comes, chillingly, from Nazi medical experiments.
http://www.jlaw.com/.../NaziMedEx.html

Custom-designed, IBM-produced punch cards, sorted by IBM machines leased to the Nazis, helped organize and manage the initial identification and social expulsion of Jews and others, the confiscation of their property, their ghettoization, their deportation, and, ultimately, even their extermination.
IBM's German subsidiary was Deutsche Hollerith Maschinen Gesellschaft, known by the acronym Dehomag.
For example, one series of punch cards was designed to record religion, national origin, and mother tongue, but by creating special columns and rows for Jew, Polish language, Polish nationality, the fur trade as an occupation, and then Berlin, Nazis could quickly cross-tabulate, at the rate of 25,000 cards per hour, exactly how many Berlin furriers were Jews of Polish extraction. Railroad cars, which could take two weeks to locate and route, could be swiftly dispatched in just 48 hours by means of a vast network of punch-card machines. Indeed, IBM services coursed through the entire German infrastructure in Europe.

Microwave cooking (necessary for troops in Russia)



#4 Mr Humphreys

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 08:52 AM

There may be some useful information in this site's interpretation of Hitler:

http://www.adolfthegreat.com/

However there are links at the bottom to some questionable holocaust-denial sites - which opens up another historical debate.

#5 Mr Moorhouse

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 10:07 AM

www.helsinki.fi/iehc2006/papers3/Spoerer85.pdf - Guns and Butter but no margarine. An article that provides a detailed analysis of the impact of policies on German society. Includes positive and negative aspects and has a range of stats to support it.

#6 ThÝch Quảng Đức

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 02:01 AM

There may be some useful information in this site's interpretation of Hitler:

http://www.adolfthegreat.com/

However there are links at the bottom to some questionable holocaust-denial sites - which opens up another historical debate.


It upsets me that anyone would make a site called Adolph the Great.

#7 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 27 June 2007 - 10:21 PM

It upsets me that anyone would make a site called Adolph the Great.

Agree 100%.
He wasn't 'great' in any sense of the word I'm prepared to accept.

The difficulty, however, is acknowledging that he WAS very clever (in a trickster kind of way), and he WAS a brilliant propagandist and self-publicist, and that there WAS a booming of German creativity in many ways at this time, without appearing to praise him.

#8 george34

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Posted 04 August 2008 - 12:22 PM

Physicians documented the health hazards of asbestos, and in 1943 Germany became the first nation to recognize lung cancer and mesothelioma caused by asbestos inhalation as compensable occupational illnesses.

Well perhaps things would have been different now if people had listen to those early warnings for asbestos. Now the number of asbestos victims gets higher and higher as a result of their former work and I find it pretty unfair, these people need serious compensations, which should also be approached legally, not just medically.




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