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Slave Abolition And The Enlightenment


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#1 Emma Shillam

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Posted 05 October 2007 - 09:42 PM

I have been looking for a site to help me to write an essay on the reasons for the Slave Trade Act, 1807, which has to include stuff on the Enlightenment, as one of the reasons for the act. I've searched for over an hour :warning: , and found nothing. Please can anyone help? Is there a good site which can explain this? :huh:
thanx

#2 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 08:50 AM

Basically, the philosophes of the Enlightenment believed in the 'Rights of man', and so they opposed slavery and the slave trade.
As the ideas of the Enlightenment seeped into everyday thinking, so ordinary people began to question the rigth of one human being to 'own' another, and this was one of the founding ideas of the abolition movement.
It is all very deep for Key Stage 3, however - I am amazed you have heard of the Enlgihtenment!

You need to knwo that there is a bit of a debate about which was the BIGGER influence in underlying the abolition movement - the new ideas of the Enlightenment, or the caring ideas of Christianity.

This webpage - http://www.spartacus...antislavery.htm - is a general overview.
and this goes into more detail - http://www.nationala...s/abolition.htm.

This VERY difficult article looks at the role of both the Enlightenment and Chrsitianity in the abolition movement - http://www.jubilee-c...ticalaction.htm.
Do a CTRL-F and look for the word 'Enlightenment' to flick through the references.
Also, you will find some source documents here - http://www.thecaveon...ghtslavery.html

#3 Emma Shillam

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Posted 06 October 2007 - 02:32 PM

Basically, the philosophes of the Enlightenment believed in the 'Rights of man', and so they opposed slavery and the slave trade.
As the ideas of the Enlightenment seeped into everyday thinking, so ordinary people began to question the rigth of one human being to 'own' another, and this was one of the founding ideas of the abolition movement.
It is all very deep for Key Stage 3, however - I am amazed you have heard of the Enlgihtenment!

You need to knwo that there is a bit of a debate about which was the BIGGER influence in underlying the abolition movement - the new ideas of the Enlightenment, or the caring ideas of Christianity.

This webpage - http://www.spartacus...antislavery.htm - is a general overview.
and this goes into more detail - http://www.nationala...s/abolition.htm.

This VERY difficult article looks at the role of both the Enlightenment and Chrsitianity in the abolition movement - http://www.jubilee-c...ticalaction.htm.
Do a CTRL-F and look for the word 'Enlightenment' to flick through the references.
Also, you will find some source documents here - http://www.thecaveon...ghtslavery.html


Thank you so much!!! :)

#4 skicat

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 12:35 PM

i have to write a project on why was slavery abolished in the british empire
and i dont know what to do
HELP!!!
it has to inclued a page on white middle class campaigners
white working class campaigners
Black peoples actions and
economics

i can't find any usefull sites!!!

Thanx
Skicat

#5 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 03:41 PM

Good question.
Try a forum search for
+slave +trade +abolition

Get back to us if this isn't enough

#6 chloe louise

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 04:50 PM


Hello im hoping someone can please help me - for our humanities homework we have been asked to find out about peoples opinions of slavery - that is people now-a-days and what they think about it. Im stuck because i could just ask people what they think but thats not what our teacher wants.
Thankyou

#7 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 10:43 PM

The United Nations World Conference against Racism, held in 2001, declared that slavery was, and is, a crime against humanity.

Article 4 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) said that "No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms".

This is a report of a statement in 1998 by then UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

In 2008, current UN Secretary Ban Ki-moon said:

Despite centuries of prohibition against slavery, traditional forms still exist. We have also seen a disturbing emergence of contemporary forms of slavery, such as the sale of children, debt bondage and human trafficking. Domestic and migrant workers are often kept as de facto slaves, as are people working in construction, food, garment and other industries.
The global economic crisis could exacerbate this already alarming situation. Poor people are likely to be driven further into poverty, making them more vulnerable to slavery-like practices. Those who consciously exploit them will have to extract even more to make a profit, and consumers who may not be aware of the consequences will be more likely to purchase products whose labour costs are kept unreasonably low.


In 2006 Tony Blair apologised for the slave trade -- his statement is here.

There are some young people's opinions here.

You will find some challenging and controversial statements here, and this Christian woman claims that 'slavery is not wrong'. Amazingly, this black American writes, also, that slavery was GOOD!

We blacks were changed, for the better, I might add, on account of slavery. We are a better race today because our ancestors went though slavery. The millions of lives lost were not lost in vain. The Europeans proclaimed the need for us to be civilised through slavery and though this may be hard to understand, they were right. Indeed, based on what is happening in black Africa today—slavery for us in the West was, in many respects, our salvation.

Though remember that, it being the internet, there is little proof that it is not a white racist pretending to be black.

Further:
Is THIS any help?

And I suspect this may be relevant somewhere along the line.

#8 Grass

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 10:59 AM

please help me!!

i got to do an essay on the abolision of the slave trade in 1833 over half term.

its entitled "why slavery was abolished in 1833"

im an stuck on the reason why slavery was abolished.

ive got so far: slave revolts, campaingers, cheeper food..................is there any other points??


PLEASE HELP!!!!!

#9 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 06:49 PM

Falling profits.
In 1700 a slave trader could buy a slave in Africa for £3 and sell him/her in America for £25.
In 1800 the buying price was £20, but the selling price had only risen to £35, so there wan't the profit to be made (this also explains why mortality rates on the Middle Passage fell so greatly in the last quarter of the 18th century).

Look also into the Dolben Act, which is often underrated as a cause of the demise of the slave trade.

The KEY thing to realise was that the slave trade was dying BEFORE the 1807 Act.

#10 Grass

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 09:37 AM

Falling profits.
In 1700 a slave trader could buy a slave in Africa for £3 and sell him/her in America for £25.
In 1800 the buying price was £20, but the selling price had only risen to £35, so there wan't the profit to be made (this also explains why mortality rates on the Middle Passage fell so greatly in the last quarter of the 18th century).

Look also into the Dolben Act, which is often underrated as a cause of the demise of the slave trade.

The KEY thing to realise was that the slave trade was dying BEFORE the 1807 Act.


thank you sooooooooooo much really helped!!

could i put the failing porfits in with the encomic paragraph, with the cheeper food or is it a completely a different paragraph????

#11 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 20 February 2009 - 05:03 PM

could i put the failing porfits in with the encomic paragraph, with the cheeper food or is it a completely a different paragraph????

I would give it a separate paragraph

#12 Grass

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 12:27 PM

once again thank you!!

really helped!!

:rolleyes:

#13 truongvan

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Posted 10 March 2009 - 12:51 PM

well, actually, i was asked to find about different opinions that people had/have about:
- Why The trans Atlantics slave trade occured?
- what people think about the conditions?
- and why the emancipation of slave trade occured?
i just look over all of the links but didn't find any thing good and make sense with my problems
can you please help me!

#14 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 05:12 PM

This is all a VERY difficult subject:

- Why The trans Atlantics slave trade occured?

Most historians have presented it as a primarily economic activity, although modern historians have increasingly stressed the racial element. So the debate is now, did British slave traders carry on the trade for profit (blind to colour), or did they carry it on because they regarded the black-skinned people of Africa as inferior (and therefore saw them as fair game to trade for profit)?

- what people think about the conditions?

In the past, historians simply banged on about the terrible conditions, and viewed the Middle Passage mainly as a desciptive exercise. More recently, historians have suggested that most of this tradition view comes from descriptions by abolitionists, who were either VERY biased or simply totally lied. They have questioned the huge numbers of supposed deaths, and pointed out that it was in the traders' interests to keep their cargo alive!

- and why the abolition of the slave trade occured?

The first historians of the abolition presented this as a great British gift to the world, pioneered by Wilberforce and then enforced by the British Navy. To a degree,this is still accepted, but modern historians tend to stress the economic reasons for the decline of the trade (it simply was no longer profitable) and the rol played by black Britons in securing abolition.

This article includes some (very shallow and very biased) information about the historiography of the slave trade.

#15 truongvan

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Posted 17 March 2009 - 11:28 AM

This is all a VERY difficult subject:

- Why The trans Atlantics slave trade occured?

Most historians have presented it as a primarily economic activity, although modern historians have increasingly stressed the racial element. So the debate is now, did British slave traders carry on the trade for profit (blind to colour), or did they carry it on because they regarded the black-skinned people of Africa as inferior (and therefore saw them as fair game to trade for profit)?

- what people think about the conditions?

In the past, historians simply banged on about the terrible conditions, and viewed the Middle Passage mainly as a desciptive exercise. More recently, historians have suggested that most of this tradition view comes from descriptions by abolitionists, who were either VERY biased or simply totally lied. They have questioned the huge numbers of supposed deaths, and pointed out that it was in the traders' interests to keep their cargo alive!

- and why the abolition of the slave trade occured?

The first historians of the abolition presented this as a great British gift to the world, pioneered by Wilberforce and then enforced by the British Navy. To a degree,this is still accepted, but modern historians tend to stress the economic reasons for the decline of the trade (it simply was no longer profitable) and the rol played by black Britons in securing abolition.

This article includes some (very shallow and very biased) information about the historiography of the slave trade.

these are really help, thanks a lot. and i want to ask about one little thing. we were asked to "demostrate understanding" about the influences of the social. which means the culture, the beliefs and the opinions of people might different about slavery. how did different socials influenced to the culture, beliefs and opinions of people about slavery? where can i find those information or which structure of information should i write about these?( i don't even understand!==')




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