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British Empire: Where Was It And How Did The People Ruled Feel?


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#1 jennzie

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 10:39 AM

my history teacher is not very good at explaining the british empire so is it alright if you help me with :
countries that were ruled
the rulers and the ruled
and the opinions of the rulers and the ruled


thank you so much

#2 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 02:48 PM

I am going to cheat (!) and repeat ideas from one of Mr. Clare's answers.

To start with I would go here: http://www.learningcurve.gov.uk/empire. This uses original documents to help you understand the British Empire.

Then you could try here: http://www.britishempire.co.uk and here: http://www.victorian...pire/index.html.

Finally, if you want still more information, this website has a lot of detail: http://www.friesian.com/british.htm.

You will have to look through carefully to find some answers, but I seem to remember that you are good at that.

#3 jennzie

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 04:06 PM

thank you soo much

i will look through those websites u gave me and if i dont understand anything i will come back


thank you!!!

#4 jennzie

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 04:10 PM

oh yeah sorry i forgot to ask...
do you have any sites where you can find out how the ruled were treated and their opinions on the rulers???

thank you so much x

#5 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 20 September 2009 - 05:23 PM

oh yeah sorry i forgot to ask...
do you have any sites where you can find out how the ruled were treated and their opinions on the rulers???

thank you so much x


This is a very BIG question!

People's attitudes and opinions would depend on many different factors. For example, if you lived in North America then you might be really happy in 1763 because the British had just beaten the French and saved you from being invaded. However, less than 20 years later many Americans were prepared to fight a war against the British because they thought their freedom was being taken away.

I will have a look around and get back to you later.

#6 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 09:03 PM

Still having a bit of trouble with this one, I'm afraid. I will keep digging.

Meanwhile, have a look at some of the 'Nations and Empire' films on this website:

http://www.timelines.tv/

I would start with 'The Scramble for Africa'.

#7 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 22 September 2009 - 05:37 PM

Don't know when your deadline is, so here are a few ideas which might help you.

In the early days of the British Empire, the focus was very much on trade. So, although people who lived in for example, West Africa, the Caribbean or India weren't always overjoyed at the arrival of the British, some did very well out of trading. To start with, the British colonies were small, so they needed the support of the rulers of the different countries.

In the nineteenth century, trade was still important, but Britain was increasingly taking over large areas of land, e.g. in Africa. Sometimes this meant fighting wars against people who did not want to be taken over e.g. the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879. The British generally thought they were bringing 'civilisation' to the new countries of the Empire. However, to the people who lived there, it must have felt that control of their lives was being taken away from them in many ways. It wasn't all bad news as the British did bring many good things, such as railways, improved education and 'good government'.

By the twentieth century many parts of the Empire increasingly wanted to govern themselves and this was particularly evident in the 'white' Dominions e.g Canada, Australia, New Zealand. The British Empire was perceived as holding back progress and democracy. Sometimes this led to fighting, e.g. in Malaya 1948-60. In other places both sides came to a more or less peaceful agreement.

Historians are still arguing over how much the British Empire benefited those people it ruled.

#8 jennzie

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 08:07 PM

oh sorry i never realised you replied..
thank you so much
my deadline is around 2 weeks
thank you so much for helping me and taking some of your time with this hard question.
the website is good too,
thanks again


#9 glitterglitter

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 11:42 PM

Hi,

Late reply, and slight 'curved ball' but isn't it difficult to find out the attitude of the 'oppressed' by the very fact that they were oppressed? Surely you could mention that in your answer? "History was written by the victors" and all that. Do you the think a)many Immigrants had decent literacy levels (it may even have taken a couple of generations) and b)Government would have been happy to let them have their say? I would be really surprised if there existed lots of primary evidence that was easily accessible. I admit I don't know much about this topic.

In other words - maybe they're any many records about how those people felt :(

It's not relevant to your topic, but if you're interested in this you should read 'The Colour Purple' or ''To Kill a Mockingbird' or 'I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings' all about USA x

#10 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 28 September 2009 - 12:24 AM

What makes it so difficult is that the response was so wide
You really need to know a HUGE amount of history of the empire, and then to sit down and analyse all the different responses.
In many places, the British rule was appreciated (e.g. in Inida when the British abolished Thugees).
In some places it was resented (intelligent Indians complained about discrimination)
In some palces there was subvert resistance (slave maids poisoned their mistress's babies)
In many places there was open rebellion (e.g. the Maroons, Zulus, MauMaus)
In some places there was obsequious deference (e.g. Zanzibar after we bombarded it)
In many palces there was eager acquisiton of British ways (e.g. cricket in India and the West Indies/ rugby in New Zealand, Samoa etc.)
In many places there was wistful acceptance (in many African tribes, for instance)
In some places native ways disappeared (e.g. many West Indians coming across from Jamaicain the 1950s were more British than the British)
In some places they hung tenaciously onto their traditions, so that the British had very little influence at all (e.g. Papua New Guinea)
In some places native traditions 'went underground' (e..g voodoo)
and what about the Boers, who did a deal with the British to accept riti9sh rule if the British let them introduce apartheid?

So you have a HUGE range of reactions, from Canada to New Caledonia.
REALLY hard question

#11 jennzie

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Posted 30 September 2009 - 10:05 PM

Oh wow, there's a lot of information there.thank you so much for your help. My assessment is tomorrow and we are focusing on 3 rulers and 3 ruled all from different countries (Fiji, Canada,australia, etc) and yes it is a hard question but I will try my best to analyse them and write about them. Thank you so much for helping me!




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