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Polish Contribution To Second World War


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#1 Demetrius Vadavostok

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 07:50 PM

Did Polish codebreakers break the enigma code during the II world war or did the British break it?
What was the top scoring air squadron during the Battle of Britain on British side?

#2 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 08:26 PM

Did Polish codebreakers break the enigma code during the II world war or did the British break it?


Briefly, Polish codebreakers did crack the German Engima code before the Second World War. There is a, fairly complicated, webpage on this here. However, the Germans kept making the code more complicated, so British and other Allied codebreakers had to keep breaking the different versions during the war.

What was the top scoring air squadron during the Battle of Britain on British side?


It seems to be generally agreed that the most successful RAF Squadron during the Battle of Britain was No.303 (Polish) Squadron. However, I suspect that you may have already known that. There is a very detailed survey of this chapter in the Squadron's history on this webpage.


There is a good brief survey of the Polish air contribution to the British forces here.

#3 Daks

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Posted 01 April 2010 - 08:37 PM

the Polish i believe contributed greatly to the allied cause during WWII, not only did they resist being attacked on two fronts by strong countries for a good amount of time (especially considering the fact that they were fighting a new type of war) they also showed the rest of the world how the war would be played. however they helped the Axis by being something of a testing ground for their weapons and tactics, and of course after this the Germans were able to use the natural rescources there.

#4 Cyfer

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Posted 16 May 2010 - 06:10 PM

People have estimated that without the initial Polish investigation into the early stages of the enigma machine, the codebreakers at Bletchely Park would have been put back by 2 years. This may not seem like a large amount, but the amount of codes they may have missed in those two years would be astounding.

Having been to Bletchley Park and gotten a tour of the place it seems that their effort did really contribute, unfortunately they were impeded by the war (started a year earlier in Poland) and many academics were gathered and massacred. A few did manage to escape to England though.

Quite ironically, the British code machine (Type-X) was pretty much the Enigma machine with a few more dials, but the Germans didn't know the Type-X was of similar setup and they simply didn't dedicate the manforce to the task.

#5 poland first to fight

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:16 PM

Linking to Polish pilots in Battle of Britain I would like to ask if anyone knows a website with a list of leading allied and/or axis aces in Battle of Britain?

#6 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 07:56 PM

I suspect that you might already be aware of the leading Allied ace of the Battle of Britain, as he served with 303 (Polish) Squadron; Josef Frantisek (a Czech pilot). There is a short article about leading Allied aces in the Battle of Britain here, A longer list of Allied aces can be found on the History Learning Site on this page. There is a website with very in-depth details about Luftwaffe aces, but I am not entirely convinced by some of the figures given. However, this discrepancy may arise from disputes about the start and end dates of the Battle.

#7 poland first to fight

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Posted 28 August 2011 - 09:22 PM

To be honest I wasn't sure about the leading ace. According to the list on wikipedia it said that Eric Lock was the top ace but possibly due to unclear starting dates & ending dates of 'BoB' the list may vary. Frantisek finished with 17 planes shot down but leading Polish pilot Urbanowicz said that he shot down 17 as well but officially it is 15.

Edited by poland first to fight, 30 August 2011 - 04:59 PM.





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