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20Th Century Ideologies


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#1 embertathiana

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Posted 15 June 2010 - 08:03 PM

I have an essay due on Sunday about 20th century ideologies and how Christianity interacted w/ them in terms of the activities of evangelicals and the ecumenical movement. Where should I start?

#2 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 16 June 2010 - 08:22 PM

Well, of we thought the last essay was difficult, we hadn't reckoned on this one.

What you OUGHT to do, is to identify what are the main 'twentieth century ideologies', and then detail how the Church (particularly evangelicals and ecumencials) interacted with them.
What were the 'twentieth century ideologies' (I would say fascism, communism, science and capitalism, but is your teacher thinking of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Sikhism etc)?
How good is your general knowledge (for example, how well-up are you on things such as how the Protestant Church reacted towards Nazism - Niemoller, Bonhoeffer etc.?)
Basically, approaching the question this way requires you to write a history of the whole of the 20th century.

I think if I were you, I would 'turn the question about' and write about the history of evangelicalism and ecumenicalism in the 20th century, dealing with the ideologies 'as they "come along"'.

Strangely enough, I found this article(even though it talks about the FUTURE of evangelicalism) very stimulating.
IMHO, the hisatory of the Church in the later 20th century was dominated by two vastly different and ultimately ineffective responses.
The Evangelicals' reaction (think Bible-belt Americans) has basically been to become ULTRA-conservative. They swung behind Reagan in the Cold War, and then Bush against the Muslims, they rejected rock-and-roll, and still reject homosexuality and abortion etc. This approach has basically been morally-focussed, but in its extremism and lack of love (and utlimately in its failure) it has been a failing strategy as 'the world' has simply swept it away.
The Ecumenicals' reaction (think Liberal CofE) has been - as in the famous Not the 9 o'clock news skit - to try to embrace everything (e.g. even Satanism was declared a 'theologically grey area') and accept everything (the word is 'dialogue'). This approach has been perceived as wishy-washy (why believe in them when they seem to have no unique beliefs) and the world has simply swept by it.

#3 rainedimattia

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 01:40 PM

I have the same paper due on Sunday, and I found your advice helpful. I'm having one problem though, is pinpointing the evangelical and ecumenical movements during that time period. Everything out there is wide, not narrow at all. Can you name specific evangelists of that time frame that might narrow it down?

#4 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 05:47 PM

I have the same paper due on Sunday, and I found your advice helpful. I'm having one problem though, is pinpointing the evangelical and ecumenical movements during that time period. Everything out there is wide, not narrow at all. Can you name specific evangelists of that time frame that might narrow it down?

List of evangelicals here; Billy Graham is perhaps the most famous, the friend of presidents.

Quotes from a couple of ecumenicals here.




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