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#1 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 25 October 2010 - 12:34 PM

Hi.
As you know, I am updating the www.johndclare.net website.
It will take a long time, so please be patient.

However, if you spot anything drastic - for example, a page which is massively corrupting - please report it here.
Thanks
JCL

#2 carolyn

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 08:28 PM

Hi.
As you know, I am updating the www.johndclare.net website.
It will take a long time, so please be patient.

However, if you spot anything drastic - for example, a page which is massively corrupting - please report it here.
Thanks
JCL


Hi i don't seem to be able to get any of the E Booklets, I'm looking for the America ones as i'm teaching it next week for the first time. I've been usuing WW1 booklet which is great.! I did print that off a number of weeks ago though.

#3 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 10:03 PM

Hi i don't seem to be able to get any of the E Booklets, I'm looking for the America ones as i'm teaching it next week for the first time. I've been usuing WW1 booklet which is great.! I did print that off a number of weeks ago though.

You can get at the e-booklets from here.

The one on America is here; apologies that it is not as professional as the others.

#4 carolyn

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 09:53 PM


Hi i don't seem to be able to get any of the E Booklets, I'm looking for the America ones as i'm teaching it next week for the first time. I've been usuing WW1 booklet which is great.! I did print that off a number of weeks ago though.

You can get at the e-booklets from here.

The one on America is here; apologies that it is not as professional as the others.


Thank you, i only found out i'd be teaching this topic last Thurs, it'll be a great help.

#5 dfrose

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Posted 24 November 2010 - 11:28 AM

Hi.
As you know, I am updating the www.johndclare.net website.
It will take a long time, so please be patient.

However, if you spot anything drastic - for example, a page which is massively corrupting - please report it here.
Thanks
JCL


You have posted a page I created many years ago. http://www.johndclar...imar1_frose.htm

I removed it from on line for a reason. Please remove the page from your site.


Thank you.
D. Frose

#6 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 11:27 AM

You have posted a page I created many years ago. http://www.johndclar...imar1_frose.htm

I removed it from on line for a reason. Please remove the page from your site.


Thank you.
D. Frose

I have acceded to your wishes and removed the page.
I have to say that I am disappointed that you are not prepared to share what was a very convenient and thorough set of notes with others.

You need to be aware that there are 38 copies of these notes on the Internet Archive Wayback Machine, so you are not removing them from the public domain - you are just stopping pupils getting at them conveniently and relevantly from my website.

#7 poland first to fight

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 07:24 PM

In the section "Battle of Atlantic" it says:"The work of the British codebreakers at Bletchley Park in deciphering the German Enigma code was vital in giving the Allied navies the edge in the Battle of the Atlantic." I am not sure whenever you wanted to say that British codebraekers broke the enigma first or just continued the work of Polish codebrakers which actually broke the code first.

#8 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 02 December 2010 - 11:58 PM

just continued the work of Polish codebrakers which actually broke the code first.

Did they? I know nothing of this?
Have you any details?

#9 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 07:45 AM


just continued the work of Polish codebrakers which actually broke the code first.

Did they? I know nothing of this? Have you any details?


The Poles not only managed to crack the German enigma code, using early versions of the 'bombe' machinery later further developed at Bletchley Park, they also passed the information on the the French and British. For an example of a recent survey, Hugh Sebag-Montefiore's 'Enigma: The Battle for the Code' gives more detail. This has been mentioned once or twice before, on this thread for example.

#10 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 03 December 2010 - 05:49 PM

Wow!

#11 poland first to fight

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 03:38 PM

I've just spotted something fairly drastic on your website. In the section battle of Britain you listed out four reasons why Britain had survived the battle. I would like to point out that you missed one or two very important reasons for why Hitler failed to conquer Britain. Firstly, I think the most remarkable is the fact that British pilots were joined by many pilots from Poland, Czech republic, Canada or New Zealand. 12% out all German planes destroyed in Battle of Britain were destroyed by Polish pilots. Unfortunately I don't know in percent how many planes were destroyed by pilots from Czech republic, New Zealand, Canada and so on, but I presume that pilots from countries other than Britain were responsible for quarter of all German planes destroyed in the Battle of Britain.

Now, when we talk about numbers like 25% or rather at least 25%, I think we can classify it as one of the biggest reasons for why Britain managed to survive the German aggression. Also, foreign pilots had modified the way that British pilots were flying. What I mean is that the British were flying in tight formations which meant that they were spending more time on looking at themselves in order not to collide rather than looking out into the sky looking out for enemies. The foreign pilots had brought new style of flying into RAF which increased the capabilities of its pilots.

Another point which I am not really sure about is or rather are the supplies from America to Britain. I would like to ask a question here. I am not sure if there were any deliveries of supplies from America to Britain during Battle of Britain. If yes, then I think I would include this to your "reason-for-why-Britain-survived" list because of how helpful the supplies of fuel etc. are during the war, especially when you are isolated on the island with little resources of oil. If there were no supplies from America to Britain then it is my mistake. :warning:

#12 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:20 PM

I've just spotted something fairly drastic on your website. In the section battle of Britain you listed out four reasons why Britain had survived the battle. I would like to point out that you missed one or two very important reasons for why Hitler failed to conquer Britain. Firstly, I think the most remarkable is the fact that British pilots were joined by many pilots from Poland, Czech republic, Canada or New Zealand. 12% out all German planes destroyed in Battle of Britain were destroyed by Polish pilots. Unfortunately I don't know in percent how many planes were destroyed by pilots from Czech republic, New Zealand, Canada and so on, but I presume that pilots from countries other than Britain were responsible for quarter of all German planes destroyed in the Battle of Britain.

Now, when we talk about numbers like 25% or rather at least 25%, I think we can classify it as one of the biggest reasons for why Britain managed to survive the German aggression. Also, foreign pilots had modified the way that British pilots were flying. What I mean is that the British were flying in tight formations which meant that they were spending more time on looking at themselves in order not to collide rather than looking out into the sky looking out for enemies. The foreign pilots had brought new style of flying into RAF which increased the capabilities of its pilots.

Another point which I am not really sure about is or rather are the supplies from America to Britain. I would like to ask a question here. I am not sure if there were any deliveries of supplies from America to Britain during Battle of Britain. If yes, then I think I would include this to your "reason-for-why-Britain-survived" list because of how helpful the supplies of fuel etc. are during the war, especially when you are isolated on the island with little resources of oil. If there were no supplies from America to Britain then it is my mistake. :warning:


These are really good ideas, and I will try to find a way to incorporate them into my website.
Thank you.
My main worry is that I'm going to have to wait a while before I can do so, and I'm terrified that I will forget!
If nothing's happened after a fortnight, please remind me!

#13 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 10:31 PM

I am sure Mr. Clare will also be keen to reply, however, I have a couple of points to make. The section you refer to on this page of johndclare.net referring to the Battle of Britain actually talks about the 'Four developments laid the foundations of Britainís survival'. That is to say, underlying factors, some of which began several years before the outbreak of the Second World War on 1st September 1939. Therefore, the vitally important contribution of the Polish (and other non-British pilots) would not really have a place here. Although there were supplies from America, these were still on a relatively limited scale at the time of the Battle of Britain. However, with the Lend-Lease Act of March 1941, America beagn to send billions of pounds worth of essential supplies to Britain. There is more information on Lend Lease on this page from the excellent Spartacus Schoolnet website.

As for the following section from Mr. Clare's site on 'The Battle of Britain', it was never intended as as a comprehensive history of the Battle. This section of the site is designed as a revision aid for GCSE examination students, many of whom have neither the time nor, to be frank, the interest to research the full history of 1940. However, it may be that, in his spare time (!) Mr. Clare will be able to consider adding a link to information about the Polish contribution which was, as you rightly point out, very important (for example the celebrated 302 and 303 squadrons).

Meanwhile, you have played your part in expanding the knowledge base of this site and drawing people's attention to the, perhaps somewhat unsung, Polish contribution. Many thanks for your contribution.

#14 poland first to fight

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Posted 15 January 2011 - 05:30 PM

I am sure Mr. Clare will also be keen to reply, however, I have a couple of points to make. The section you refer to on this page of johndclare.net referring to the Battle of Britain actually talks about the 'Four developments laid the foundations of Britainís survival'. That is to say, underlying factors, some of which began several years before the outbreak of the Second World War on 1st September 1939. Therefore, the vitally important contribution of the Polish (and other non-British pilots) would not really have a place here. Although there were supplies from America, these were still on a relatively limited scale at the time of the Battle of Britain. However, with the Lend-Lease Act of March 1941, America beagn to send billions of pounds worth of essential supplies to Britain. There is more information on Lend Lease on this page from the excellent Spartacus Schoolnet website.

As for the following section from Mr. Clare's site on 'The Battle of Britain', it was never intended as as a comprehensive history of the Battle. This section of the site is designed as a revision aid for GCSE examination students, many of whom have neither the time nor, to be frank, the interest to research the full history of 1940. However, it may be that, in his spare time (!) Mr. Clare will be able to consider adding a link to information about the Polish contribution which was, as you rightly point out, very important (for example the celebrated 302 and 303 squadrons).

Meanwhile, you have played your part in expanding the knowledge base of this site and drawing people's attention to the, perhaps somewhat unsung, Polish contribution. Many thanks for your contribution.



I would like to add that foreign pilots in the Battle of Britain were responsible for at least quarter of all German planes shot down. As I said in my previous post those 25%(more likely to be even bigger) were vital to the British. I suppose that these numbers could have changed the course of history and allow the Luftwaffe to take control over the skies of Britain. Once the German Land forces would land in Britain that would mean quick German victory. So, I'll guess that fact should really be taught in British schools simply because of the difference which it made, a difference between victory and defeat.

#15 poland first to fight

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 07:39 PM


I've just spotted something fairly drastic on your website. In the section battle of Britain you listed out four reasons why Britain had survived the battle. I would like to point out that you missed one or two very important reasons for why Hitler failed to conquer Britain. Firstly, I think the most remarkable is the fact that British pilots were joined by many pilots from Poland, Czech republic, Canada or New Zealand. 12% out all German planes destroyed in Battle of Britain were destroyed by Polish pilots. Unfortunately I don't know in percent how many planes were destroyed by pilots from Czech republic, New Zealand, Canada and so on, but I presume that pilots from countries other than Britain were responsible for quarter of all German planes destroyed in the Battle of Britain.

Now, when we talk about numbers like 25% or rather at least 25%, I think we can classify it as one of the biggest reasons for why Britain managed to survive the German aggression. Also, foreign pilots had modified the way that British pilots were flying. What I mean is that the British were flying in tight formations which meant that they were spending more time on looking at themselves in order not to collide rather than looking out into the sky looking out for enemies. The foreign pilots had brought new style of flying into RAF which increased the capabilities of its pilots.

Another point which I am not really sure about is or rather are the supplies from America to Britain. I would like to ask a question here. I am not sure if there were any deliveries of supplies from America to Britain during Battle of Britain. If yes, then I think I would include this to your "reason-for-why-Britain-survived" list because of how helpful the supplies of fuel etc. are during the war, especially when you are isolated on the island with little resources of oil. If there were no supplies from America to Britain then it is my mistake. :warning:


These are really good ideas, and I will try to find a way to incorporate them into my website.
Thank you.
My main worry is that I'm going to have to wait a while before I can do so, and I'm terrified that I will forget!
If nothing's happened after a fortnight, please remind me!


I am reminding... :rolleyes:




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