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The Great Plague Homework Help


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#1 Sapphire

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 03:42 PM

Hi could you please help me with the plague homework which is linked on this website:
http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/year8links/plague/Plaguebooklet.pdf
I have to complete tasks 1,2,3 and 4
Task one
Can you create a poster advertising ways of avoiding the
plague? Use colour and remember not to use any words
about germs – they didn’t know about them.
Task two
You are a doctor, what treatments would you use and how effective
do you think they would be? Your brother is a priest, what
treatments and ways of avoiding the plague does he tell you are
best?

Task three
You are a writer – produce a piece for a modern day textbook on
what people believed caused the plague in 1348.

Your next task is to prepare a report on what we know today about
the plague. Use all the sources available to you including the
internet – some helpful sites are mentioned earlier in this booklet
and some are at the back.

Please help me with this homework as soon as possible as I have to finish it by Monday so, I have to finish this work. Thanks

#2 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 04:39 PM

This is a nice homework.

What you need to understand is that in those days they didn't know about germs - they couldn't even SEE them!
Instead they blamed other things for the disease - e.g. bad smells, a punishment from God because you had sinned, an 'imbalance of the humours' (ie you'd got too, wet, too dry, too hot or too cold, a conjunction of the planets etc.
And so their cures were - to us - really wierd.

If you read this webpage, you will find a lot of their different cures which you will be able to use to answer your questions.

#3 Sapphire

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 06:48 PM

This is a nice homework.

What you need to understand is that in those days they didn't know about germs - they couldn't even SEE them!
Instead they blamed other things for the disease - e.g. bad smells, a punishment from God because you had sinned, an 'imbalance of the humours' (ie you'd got too, wet, too dry, too hot or too cold, a conjunction of the planets etc.
And so their cures were - to us - really wierd.

If you read this webpage, you will find a lot of their different cures which you will be able to use to answer your questions.


thx a lot but, i still don't understand task 3 and 4(the difficult one). could u please help me on the answer to the question because i did task 1 and task 2.

Task 1:
Help Avoiding the Plague
1.Keep some clean clothes tightly folded and bound up in cloth treated with mint or pennyroyal, preferably in a cedar chest far from all animals and vermin.
2.At the first whisper of plague in the area, flee any populated town or village and head for an isolated villa, far from any trade routes, with your cedar chest.
3.Carefully, clean every last corner of your villa, killing all rats and burning their corpses.
4.Use plenty of mint or pennyroyal to stop fleas.
5.Allow no cats or dogs to come near you.
6.Once away from all human contact, wash in extremely hot water, change into your clean clothes, and burn the clothes you traveled in.
7.Keep a minimum distance of 25 feet from any other human being to avoid catching any pneumonic form spread through breathing and sneezing.
8.Bathe in hot water as frequently as you can.
9.Keep a fire burning in your villa to ward off the bacillus, and stay as close to it as you can stand, even in summer.
10.Have your armies burn and destroy to the ground any nearby houses where plague victims have lived.
11.Pray to the god or the saint of your choice frequently and seriously.
12.Stay where you are until six months after the most recent nearby outbreak.
They thought they had to shut themselves of from people they didn't know, so warding away strangers was one.
They also thought praying would help because they thought it was a punishment from God.
They used to have fires to get rid of the so called poison in the air.
Buying things which were special or holy or precious like jewels or a piece of the real cross things like that, but this is where some people made their trade some people would sell odd bits of wood and say it was a part of the real cross so some people would make a lot of money.

Task 2:
Doctors
TREATMENT:
Carry Flowers or wear a strong perfume
IDEA:
The smells would help to ward away the disease
WHAT HAPPENED:
Nothing
TREATMENT:
Drink hot drinks
IDEA:
The victim would then sweat out the disease
WHAT HAPPENED:
Nothing
TREATMENT:
Carry a lucky charm
IDEA:
The charm would ward off the disease
WHAT HAPPENED:
Nothing
TREATMENT:
Use leeches to bleed the victim
IDEA:
This would remove infected blood
WHAT HAPPENED:
Nothing
TREATMENT:
Smoke a pipe of tobacco
IDEA:
The smoke would ward off the disease
WHAT HAPPENED:
Nothing
TREATMENT:
Give a strong dose of laxatives
IDEA:
This would cause the victim to completely empty his/her bowels, thus removing the disease.
WHAT HAPPENED:
Strong doses of laxatives can cause death from dehydration.
TREATMENT:
Coat the victims with mercury and place them in the oven.
IDEA:
The combination of mercury and heat from the oven would kill off the disease.
WHAT HAPPENED:
This could actually increase the likelihood of death - mercury is poisonous and the heat from the oven caused serious burns.

Priests
Some early treatment included:


bathing in human urine
wearing of human excrement
placing of dead animals in homes
use of leeches
drinking molten gold/powdered emeralds
incising (cutting) and draining of abscesses (bubo)
placing patients in pest houses and isolate them from the general public
eating figs before six in the morning
chopping a snake up everyday
trying to fall asleep on the left side of the bed
not to sleep during the day
not exercising
not eating any desserts


This treatments didn't do much good. A Priest form Avignom after surviving from the plague brought a new treatment. The treatment was burning hot rods in the black abscesses. It was the only remedy at that time that saved some persons.

Please help with the other 2 tasks thx a lot :)

#4 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 26 February 2011 - 09:26 PM

Task three has been done for you by the HistoryLearning site - look at the webpage!

You will have to do task 4 yourself - the task is to find a number of sources about the plague and write a synthesis (put everything together).

#5 Sapphire

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 01:26 AM

Task three has been done for you by the HistoryLearning site - look at the webpage!

You will have to do task 4 yourself - the task is to find a number of sources about the plague and write a synthesis (put everything together).


I still don't know where task 3 is meant 2 be. could u plz do the hyperlink.
and for task 4 i don't know how to start and end it. i'm not sure about the report layout and what to write about. :/

#6 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 27 February 2011 - 02:56 AM

Two fair questions:

I still don't know where task 3 is meant 2 be. could u plz do the hyperlink.

http://www.historyle...plague_1665.htm

and for task 4 i don't know how to start and end it. i'm not sure about the report layout and what to write about.

A lot will depend on what you find out, but I would do at least three sections:
  • What caused it (how it came)
  • What happened (the events of the plague)
  • What the consequences were


#7 Sapphire

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 03:07 PM

:D

Two fair questions:


I still don't know where task 3 is meant 2 be. could u plz do the hyperlink.

http://www.historyle...plague_1665.htm

and for task 4 i don't know how to start and end it. i'm not sure about the report layout and what to write about.

A lot will depend on what you find out, but I would do at least three sections:
  • What caused it (how it came)
  • What happened (the events of the plague)
  • What the consequences were


I still don't understand task 3-could you please copy and paste the section which is needed for task 3 please. thanks.

#8 Sapphire

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 03:31 PM

The Great Plague of London (1664-1666) was an outbreak of bubonic plague that struck London and was particularly violent during the hot months of August and September of 1665. In one week, 7,165 people died of the plague. The total number of deaths was about 70,000. The disease was carried by fleas that lived on black rats. It was generally incurable, and its effects were terrible--fever and chills, swelling of the lymph glands, eventual madness and death.
People had no idea what caused the disease or how to control its rapid course. Victims of the plague were buried in large pits. Many people fled from London.
The Great Plague was an epidemic that devastated London and the south east of England between 1664 and 1666. The poor conditions in towns and cities were a major cause of the disease spreading quickly. The plague of the 1660s did not affect the wealthier areas as badly as the poor parts.
A cross was painted on the doors of those houses affected by the plague. Carts were driven around the empty streets with their drivers shouting 'bring out your dead', carrying the corpses to the burial pits. Those infected were either shut in their own homes with their families or carried to special 'pesthouses' and, once the cemeteries were filled, the dead were buried in mass graves. The epidemic was at its worst in the third week of September 1665 when the death toll was estimated at well over 10,000. A cold autumn reduced the toll to 900 deaths in the final week of November and the crisis had ended by the time the King returned to London on February 1st 1666.

Is this ok for task 4?

#9 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 06:49 PM

The Great Plague of London (1664-1666) was an outbreak of bubonic plague that struck London and was particularly violent during the hot months of August and September of 1665. In one week, 7,165 people died of the plague. The total number of deaths was about 70,000. The disease was carried by fleas that lived on black rats. It was generally incurable, and its effects were terrible--fever and chills, swelling of the lymph glands, eventual madness and death.
People had no idea what caused the disease or how to control its rapid course. Victims of the plague were buried in large pits. Many people fled from London.
The Great Plague was an epidemic that devastated London and the south east of England between 1664 and 1666. The poor conditions in towns and cities were a major cause of the disease spreading quickly. The plague of the 1660s did not affect the wealthier areas as badly as the poor parts.
A cross was painted on the doors of those houses affected by the plague. Carts were driven around the empty streets with their drivers shouting 'bring out your dead', carrying the corpses to the burial pits. Those infected were either shut in their own homes with their families or carried to special 'pesthouses' and, once the cemeteries were filled, the dead were buried in mass graves. The epidemic was at its worst in the third week of September 1665 when the death toll was estimated at well over 10,000. A cold autumn reduced the toll to 900 deaths in the final week of November and the crisis had ended by the time the King returned to London on February 1st 1666.


Is this ok for task 4?


I found this at atschool.eduweb.co.uk/heathsid/Subjects/History/plague.htm :

The Great Plague of London (1664-1666) was an outbreak of bubonic plague that struck London and was particularly violent during the hot months of August and September of 1665. In one week, 7,165 people died of the plague. The total number of deaths was about 70,000. The disease was carried by fleas that lived on black rats. It was generally incurable, and its effects were terrible--fever and chills, swelling of the lymph glands, eventual madness and death.

People had no idea what caused the disease or how to control its rapid course. Victims of the plague were buried in large pits. Many people fled from London.

The Great Plague was an epidemic that devastated London and the south east of England between 1664 and 1666. The poor conditions in towns and cities were a major cause of the disease spreading quickly. The plague of the 1660s did not affect the wealthier areas as badly as the poor parts.

A cross was painted on the doors of those houses affected by the plague. Carts were driven around the empty streets with their drivers shouting 'bring out your dead', carrying the corpses to the burial pits. Those infected were either shut in their own homes with their families or carried to special 'pesthouses' and, once the cemeteries were filled, the dead were buried in mass graves. The epidemic was at its worst in the third week of September 1665 when the death toll was estimated at well over 10,000. A cold autumn reduced the toll to 900 deaths in the final week of November and the crisis had ended by the time the King returned to London on February 1st 1666.


So no, it isn't OK; it's copying.
I think it may be the basis for what you want, but you need to accumulate your own notes from a number of sources, then write out your knowledge in your own words.

#10 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 06:53 PM

I still don't understand task 3-could you please copy and paste the section which is needed for task 3 please. thanks.

Sorry. No we can't.
Remember the rules of the forum: 'help' not 'done for you'!

#11 Sapphire

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 06:57 PM

i don't know what to do for task 3-its due in for tomorrow. please help me :( i don't understand this writer thing and all of it. please could you help me.

#12 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 07:01 PM

i don't know what to do for task 3-its due in for tomorrow. please help me :( i don't understand this writer thing and all of it. please could you help me.

Actually, I can't understand the problem here.
All it's asking you to do is to write a passage on what in those days people said caused the plague.

And your teacher wants you to write it in the 'style' of a textbook.
She could have asked you to do it as a diary, or a novel, but she's chosen a textbook.
This is the EASIEST, because all you need to do is put the facts, and perhaps a picture - like in a textbook.
if you were being EALLY clever, you might add a question box!

#13 Sapphire

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 07:53 PM

Is this information useful for task 3:

During those times, people believed a whole range of things caused the Black Death. They are:

1) Common sense reasons - for example, people believed that bad smells from things like a privy would make you ill. An account by a 15th century Swedish bishop who based his studies on a work written in the 1360s by John Jacobus, a royal doctor and Chancellor of Montpellier University, which had a renowned school of medicine, said:

'Sometimes [the pestilence] comes from... a privy [toilet] next to a chamber or any other particular thing which corrupts the air in substance and quality... sometimes it comes of dead carrion or the corruption of standing waters in ditches...'

2) The body's humours are out of balance - Galen's theory of the four humours brought this possible explanation to life. People believed that their bodies were wrought with 'evil humours' and therefore became sick. Cleansed bodies, however, were thought to be healthy because the evil humours have already been purged. John of Burgundy, a writer who wrote one of the earliest books about the Black Death in 1365, wrote:

'Many people have been killed, especially those stuffed full of evil humours. As Galen says in his book on fevers, the body does not become sick unless it already contains evil humours. The pestilential air does no harm to cleansed bodies from which evil humours have been purged.'

3) The movement of the sun and the planets - Some people thought that the coming together of planets is a sign of wonderful, terrible, or violent things to come. Guy de Chauliac, one fo teh most famous doctors in the 1300s, wrote:

'... the general cause was the close position of the three great planets, Saturn, Jupiter, and Mars. This had taken place in 1345 on 24 March in the 14th degree of Aquarius.'

4) God and the Devil - Ideas of supernatural causes were still going strong (and they even are today), and so the highly religious people of those times thought that God was the cause of all of their problems. The Prior of the abbey of Christchurch, Canterbury, wrote:

'Terrible is God towards the sons of men... He often allows plagues, miserable famines, conflicts, wars and other forms of suffering to arise, and uses them to terrify and torment men and so drive out their sins. And thus, indeed, the realm of England, because of the growing pride and corruption of its subjects, and their numberless sins... is to be oppressed by the pestilences...'

5) Invisible fumes or poisons in the air - the final of possible explanations for the Black Death is that invisible fumes or poisons could kill people from either looking at each other or merely breathing air in. An account written by a French doctor in 1349 goes:

'This epidemic... kills almost instantly, as soon as the airy spirits leaving the eyes of the sick man has struck the eye of a healthy bystander looking at him, for then the poisonous nature passes from one eye to the other.'

Please reply back. Thanks :D

#14 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 10:24 PM

Please reply back. Thanks :D

Same answer as last time.
This is from Answers.com

During those times, people believed a whole range of things caused the Black Death. They are:

1) Common sense reasons - for example, people believed that bad smells from things like a privy would make you ill. An account by a 15th century Swedish bishop who based his studies on a work written in the 1360s by John Jacobus, a royal doctor and Chancellor of Montpellier University, which had a renowned school of medicine, said:

'Sometimes [the pestilence] comes from... a privy [toilet] next to a chamber or any other particular thing which corrupts the air in substance and quality... sometimes it comes of dead carrion or the corruption of standing waters in ditches...'

2) The body's humours are out of balance - Galen's theory of the four humours brought this possible explanation to life. People believed that their bodies were wrought with 'evil humours' and therefore became sick. Cleansed bodies, however, were thought to be healthy because the evil humours have already been purged. John of Burgundy, a writer who wrote one of the earliest books about the Black Death in 1365, wrote:

'Many people have been killed, especially those stuffed full of evil humours. As Galen says in his book on fevers, the body does not become sick unless it already contains evil humours. The pestilential air does no harm to cleansed bodies from which evil humours have been purged.'

3) The movement of the sun and the planets - Some people thought that the coming together of planets is a sign of wonderful, terrible, or violent things to come. Guy de Chauliac, one fo teh most famous doctors in the 1300s, wrote:

'... the general cause was the close position of the three great planets, Saturn, Jupiter, and Mars. This had taken place in 1345 on 24 March in the 14th degree of Aquarius.'

4) God and the Devil - Ideas of supernatural causes were still going strong (and they even are today), and so the highly religious people of those times thought that God was the cause of all of their problems. The Prior of the abbey of Christchurch, Canterbury, wrote:

'Terrible is God towards the sons of men... He often allows plagues, miserable famines, conflicts, wars and other forms of suffering to arise, and uses them to terrify and torment men and so drive out their sins. And thus, indeed, the realm of England, because of the growing pride and corruption of its subjects, and their numberless sins... is to be oppressed by the pestilences...'

5) Invisible fumes or poisons in the air - the final of possible explanations for the Black Death is that invisible fumes or poisons could kill people from either looking at each other or merely breathing air in. An account written by a French doctor in 1349 goes:

'This epidemic... kills almost instantly, as soon as the airy spirits leaving the eyes of the sick man has struck the eye of a healthy bystander looking at him, for then the poisonous nature passes from one eye to the other.'

Sounds familiar?
Again, you have not answered, just copied.
The answer is correct - it's just not your answer.
MUST be in your own words.
<_<

#15 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 28 February 2011 - 10:35 PM

Is this information useful for task 3:


Yes, the information is useful. Now, you have to put in into your own words. It's processing, rather than copying, information that can help you to learn and understand what it is telling you.

Furthermore, you don't necessarily have to include all of the information you have found, or put it in the same order.

I always prefer half a page of written work in a pupil's own words, to pages of copying, let alone copy and pasting.




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