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History Edexcel Unit 2 Part B Questions


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#1 Footnotes

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 02:39 PM

Hi,

Basically I'm resitting History AS Unit 2 which I got a C in last year (I was predicted to get a very high A). I asked for a remark and it didn't go up. Having seen the paper I saw that I made a bit of a slip by not performing as well as I should have done, although even then I think a C was a bit harsh.

I really want to get an A to ensure that I get the overall A I need to get into University (my offer is AAA including History)

I'm doing Option D with Edexcel - the India 1900-1947 module

However, now that I know the material really well and have started practicing timed essays, I'm wondering whether I have the whole structure wrong.

I seem to get high marks in both sections when I do "mock" trials which are marked by my teachers, but I'm wondering whether the examiners don't like the way I structure the essay.

I'm talking about the B part question which is worth 40 (out of a total of 60) marks, and involves source work and "own knowledge". What I usually do is:

Introduction: State my overall view of what I think and what the sources seem to be suggesting, and set the question into context.

Sources: Analyse the sources from one aspect (i.e provide evidence from the sources which appears to lend weight to one side of the argument, dealing with provenance, X-referencing etc.)

Own Knowledge: I then support this side of the argument with my own knowledge, and add detail to the ideas presented in the sources, or add ideas that haven't been discussed by them. Include dates, events etc. I always link my own knowledge to the sources (i.e "As suggested by Source 13...")

Sources: I then analyse the sources from another perspective (usually I do the one I agree with second to give it more weight). Basically the same as above but arguing "the other side of the argument"

Own Knowledge: Consolidate the ideas in the sources with my own ideas, adding strength to the second argument as explained in the previous "own knowledge" part.

Conclusion

I find this the best and most comfortable way for me to analyse the sources from both points of view while dealing with the question with my own knowledge from all sides in a structured manner. However, does anyone think I'm doing this substantially wrong? Any suggestions to improve it?

I can paste a sample essay if the above is a bit confusing...

Thanks a lot for your help!

PS. Having looked back at the exam I got a C in (for which I asked for a photocopy of the paper), I'm even more confused...

The examiner wrote "There is no need for X ref and prov at A02b." on the B question.... does this mean that cross-referencing and provenance are not necessary in the 40 mark question?

I'd really appreciate any help!!

#2 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:06 PM

Welcome to the Forum.

I examine this unit for Edexcel and will post a detailed reply tomorrow. In the mean time I would suggest that you have a look at the relevant markscheme here.

#3 Footnotes

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 12:53 PM

Welcome to the Forum.

I examine this unit for Edexcel and will post a detailed reply tomorrow. In the mean time I would suggest that you have a look at the relevant markscheme here.


Will do! Thanks a lot :)

#4 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 05:41 PM

Basically I'm resitting History AS Unit 2 which I got a C in last year (I was predicted to get a very high A). I asked for a remark and it didn't go up. Having seen the paper I saw that I made a bit of a slip by not performing as well as I should have done, although even then I think a C was a bit harsh.


I would say that you are definitely on the right lines. However, if you look at the mark scheme for 'b' questions you will note that, unlike the 'a' questions, it doesn't state that you need to look at the provenance (or nature/origin/purpose etc). For AO2b, which covers use of the sources, the highest level answers will show:

developed reasoning and weighing of the evidence

but a good answer merely needs to lead with the sources, look at both sides and come to a supported judgement. It may be that too much 'source evaluation' was preventing you writing enough i.e. the dreaded 'lack of depth'.

With regard to AO1, which covers historical knowledge and an ability to write a coherent answer, the best answers are those which focus constantly on the question, with no straying into narrative or irrelevance. Level 4 answers also need very good factual support and well-integrated contextual (i.e. your own) knowledge. You apparently already do most of this, with the exception that your contextual knowledge is generally given in a separate paragraph from your information from the sources. Ideally you need to make a point from the sources, then develop it with your own (relevant) knowledge, then do the same from the next point from the sources. I also feel that most examiners would expect candidates to consider the 'given factor' before considering other factors. This would mean changing your method.

So, if the question was this:

Do you agree with the view that the main responsibility for the hasty and violent partition of India in 1947 lay with Lord Mountbatten?

Then a good plan would be:

Introduction, ideally stating line of argument

Material from sources and own knowledge which agrees that the problems mainly lay with Mountbatten

Material from sources and own knowledge which agress that the problems mainly lay with other factors (e.g. Jinnah, Nehru etc)

Conclusion, which gives a judgment supported by what you founbd from the sources.


It is well worth looking at the Examiner Reports on the Edexcel page mentioned, because they give examples of answers at different levels.

Hopefully this helps. I assume that you have discussed your previous paper with your teacher. Let us know if you need further help.

#5 Footnotes

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 07:19 PM

Dear Mr Bryant,

Thank you so much, this has really cleared things up for me.

I'm going to practice some B questions this way all this week and next in order to try to perfect the technique, but I'm pretty sure I know how to do it now

However, I do just have 2 smaller doubts about it now:
If I have a point, from my own knowledge, but that doesn't really fit in with any of the sources (or which hasn't been discussed by any of them), would it be best to place it in a paragraph of its own (possibly starting something like "However, what the sources do not consider is that...")
Having had a go at one past paper, I noticed that my cross-referencing was a lot less evident than I had previously done, although I tried my best to attempt to cross reference where possible. I felt that, as I was doing my paragraphs drawing from points in the sources (and often there's only one source which draws on a particular point), I wasn't using the sources in conjunction enough. Do you think this sounds alright, or should I try harder to try and draw parallels between the sources for each point?

Either way, thanks again for your help, I feel that the whole thing is a lot clearer in my mind now!

:)

#6 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 10:42 PM

• If I have a point, from my own knowledge, but that doesn't really fit in with any of the sources (or which hasn't been discussed by any of them), would it be best to place it in a paragraph of its own (possibly starting something like "However, what the sources do not consider is that...")


I am sure that would be fine. Alternatively, perhaps towards the end of the 'other factors' section.

• Having had a go at one past paper, I noticed that my cross-referencing was a lot less evident than I had previously done, although I tried my best to attempt to cross reference where possible. I felt that, as I was doing my paragraphs drawing from points in the sources (and often there's only one source which draws on a particular point), I wasn't using the sources in conjunction enough. Do you think this sounds alright, or should I try harder to try and draw parallels between the sources for each point?


Don't worry too much about this, I think. There should be a certain amount of more or less implicit cross-referencing about the given factor, where possible. That is, if you can back up a point made in a source by using material from another source, do so. However, there isn't the same emphasis on 'cross-referencing' as in part 'a' answers.

As the mark scheme says, refering to AO2b;

Discussion of the claim in the question proceeds from the issues raised by the process of analysing the representation in the sources.


I am glad you found the advice helpful. Best of luck for the examination.

#7 Footnotes

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 10:46 PM

If I have a point, from my own knowledge, but that doesn't really fit in with any of the sources (or which hasn't been discussed by any of them), would it be best to place it in a paragraph of its own (possibly starting something like "However, what the sources do not consider is that...")


I am sure that would be fine. Alternatively, perhaps towards the end of the 'other factors' section.

Having had a go at one past paper, I noticed that my cross-referencing was a lot less evident than I had previously done, although I tried my best to attempt to cross reference where possible. I felt that, as I was doing my paragraphs drawing from points in the sources (and often there's only one source which draws on a particular point), I wasn't using the sources in conjunction enough. Do you think this sounds alright, or should I try harder to try and draw parallels between the sources for each point?


Don't worry too much about this, I think. There should be a certain amount of more or less implicit cross-referencing about the given factor, where possible. That is, if you can back up a point made in a source by using material from another source, do so. However, there isn't the same emphasis on 'cross-referencing' as in part 'a' answers.

As the mark scheme says, refering to AO2b;

Discussion of the claim in the question proceeds from the issues raised by the process of analysing the representation in the sources.


I am glad you found the advice helpful. Best of luck for the examination.


Great!
Thank you so much for your help, and I'll let you know how I get on :)

#8 Footnotes

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 09:54 AM

Dear Mr Bryant,

Just thought I'd post back here to let you know I got full marks!

So thank you so much for all your advice :)

#9 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 09:55 PM

Dear Mr Bryant,

Just thought I'd post back here to let you know I got full marks!

So thank you so much for all your advice :)

Mr Bryant is away for a week, but I know that he will be delighted for your success, and even more that you have got back to him to tell him.
It always makes the forum moderators' day when someone says thank you, so thank you!
:)

#10 Mouselhy

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 08:30 AM

Dear Mr Bryant,

 

I noticed that you wrote about reasoning of the evidence for this question, although I do not need to consider its provenance. My teacher said it would be best if I could integrate the reasoning into the argument, and although he helped me a lot, I still have difficulties integrating the reasoning into my argument! How do I do this without considering the provenance?

 

Thank you for your help!



#11 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 20 May 2013 - 10:00 PM

Dear Mr Bryant,

 

I noticed that you wrote about reasoning of the evidence for this question, although I do not need to consider its provenance. My teacher said it would be best if I could integrate the reasoning into the argument, and although he helped me a lot, I still have difficulties integrating the reasoning into my argument! How do I do this without considering the provenance?

 

Thank you for your help!

 

I will have a look at this soon and get back to you.  Need to check what I wrote and what I meant!






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