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Simon Bolivar Vs Francois-Dominique Touissaint


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#1 duzco2

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:04 AM

Hey I have a debate on tuesday for my AP world history class! I need to debate that Simon Bolivar was MORE influential than Francois-Dominique Touissaint. It would also help you to argue the other way so i know what the opposite side would argue. So basically why would you consider him more influential and why not? Thanks!!!

#2 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 01:15 AM

I have to say that I am sorry but i do not have a clue.
Way outside my areas.
I will see if anybody on the teachers' forum can help.

#3 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:04 PM

Hey I have a debate on tuesday for my AP world history class! I need to debate that Simon Bolivar was MORE influential than Francois-Dominique Touissaint. It would also help you to argue the other way so i know what the opposite side would argue. So basically why would you consider him more influential and why not? Thanks!!!


Right, I don't know much about this as it's not really covered in the United Kingdom, but here are some ideas.

The obvious point is that Toussaint Louverture's direct influence was limited in time and place. After all, he spent most of his life fighting for freedom against the French (and the British) in Haiti and died before independence was fully achieved in 1804. So, although his cause was unsuccessful, no doubt partly inspired by his memory, his direct influence was limited.

However, you could argue that his example also inspired anti-slavery/ independence revolts elsewhere in the Caribbean, which is certainly true. However, these movements did not result in the immediate ending of slavery, let alone independence for such places as Jamaica.

On the other hand, Simon Bolivar was fortunate enough to see not one, but several independent countries come into being, partly through his efforts. I'm not going to go into detail as you know more about this than I do, but his record speaks for itself. You could argue that his later years weren't so happy but his military record is ulitmately very good and subsequent legacy in South America is vast. So, on a country by country basis, you could tot up his achievements with those of Toussaint. If you were being really unkind, you could compare South America today with Haiti, but that might be going too far. Other areas which might be worth looking at are slavery, cultural and heritage legacy (how many schools are named after each man?).

I understand this is a bit vague, but I hope it helps. Good luck in the debate; I hope it goes well and that, whoever wins, you enjoy it.




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