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Historiography Help - Extended Essay.


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#1 MissTreason

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 11:05 PM

I've been having trouble finding some historiography about the NUWSS and the WSPU. It is for my Extended essay and I've not found many quotes from historians and the ones I do find are usually irrelevant to what I'm saying in the essay.

Even just the names of a few historians may be helpful.

Thanks.

#2 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:04 PM

I've been having trouble finding some historiography about the NUWSS and the WSPU. It is for my Extended essay and I've not found many quotes from historians and the ones I do find are usually irrelevant to what I'm saying in the essay.

Even just the names of a few historians may be helpful.

Thanks.

Four basic names here.
Read also this article.

Many histories of the ‘fight for the vote’ are romantic accounts which celebrate the ‘heroes’ of the movement who ‘won’ the vote. Two of these books were written by Emmeline Pankhurst (1914) and Christabel Pankhurst (1959) themselves.
This was the approach of the BBC TV series Shoulder to Shoulder (1974).

A different approach was taken by Sylvia Pankhurst (1931). Sylvia portrayed her mother as bossy and unstable. For Sylvia, the vote was won in June 1914 by working class socialist women (led by Sylvia).

other names you might want to chase include:

Jill Liddington and Jill Norris in their 1978 study of constitutional suffrage in Lancashire – challenged London/Pankhurst focussed account

More recently a third trend has emerged in suffrage historiography based on local studies. E.g Krista Cowman study of York (2007)

C. J. BEARMAN (2007) - Demonstrations did not represent spontaneous activity by the rank and file, but were carried out or at least led by WSPU employees or ‘professional’ militants, with several visible changes in tactics which indicate an organized campaign directed by the leadership.

Rosen (1974) – dents Pankhurst centrailty
Holton (1986) – non-militant suffragists
Olive Banks (1986) – political and social factors behind the movement
Susan Kent (1987) – an attack on gender roles

Brian Harrison (1987) – the antis

Martin Pugh (2000) - How ineffective Anti-Suffragisn was during this period; cites the impetus given to the campaign by the enfranchisement of women in New Zealand and Australia, in 1893 and 1902; and crucially examines the shift towards suffragist support by the Conservative party in the 1890s.

Hope this helps.

#3 MissTreason

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 11:03 PM

Thank you. This will help me so much. :)




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