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History Iccse Paper 2 Source Analysis


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#1 r2live

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 05:23 AM

Excuse me,

I really need some help with some types of questions in the IGCSE Paper 2.

1. How far does Source B support Source A? Explain your answer using details of the sources. (6 marks)
2. Does Source D mean that Source C is unreliable? Explain your answer using the sources and
your own knowledge. (8 marks)
3. Do you think these two cartoons were published for the same reason? Explain your answer using
the sources and your own knowledge (7 marks)
4. Are you surprised by the cartoonist’s attitude towards...? Explain your answer
using the sources and your own knowledge. (8 marks)
5. Does the cartoon (Source I) show that Source J was right and Source K was wrong? Explain your
answer using the sources and your own knowledge. (9 marks)
6. How far do these sources provide convincing evidence
for this statement? Use the sources to explain your answer. (12 marks)

I know I have quite a few questions that need to be answered, and I'm sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused anyone, but if it's not too much, I also need a good method to tackle any other type of questions that may come in the exam.

My exam is on Monday, so I could use the help soon. Thank you in advance

#2 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:27 AM

Hi!

First, there is no need to multi-post. The way the forum works is that your post waits to be moderated, and we answer it when we OK it.

At this stage, I suggest two courses of action:
First, you can get detailed advice on answering sourcework questions in general here; the advice is aimed at AQA not IGCSE, but the principles are generally the same.

Second, go on the IGCSE website and look at some old markschemes (I think the one you need might be this one); that will show you exactly how pupils' answers are marked.

Get back to us if you have any further questions - best of luck with the exam.

#3 r2live

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 03:04 AM

This is perfect sir. Thanks!

And sorry about the multi-posting. I just clicked the "Add Post" button once, and it did it twice.

Also, if it's not too much trouble, I could also use a good proven method to tackle any other sort of question that might come up.

Thanks in advance

#4 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:45 AM

Also, if it's not too much trouble, I could also use a good proven method to tackle any other sort of question that might come up.

Go back - look through the past papers - and see what kinds of question they are asking; it is highly unlikely that you will get a 'kind' of question you have never seen before.

The key to answering a question is, of course, to answer the question you have been asked.
'What questions need facts.
'How' questions need 'ways'.
'Why' questions need 'reasons'
'Compare'and 'weigh' questions need 'on the one hand ... on the other' answers.
There is a brief overview here.

Many pupils 'wander off topic' so - at the end of every paragraph - look back at the question and ask yourself: 'Am I still answer the question?'
My French teacher 'Charlie' Somers taught me to 'dry stone wall' - by which he meant always, somehow, turn the question into a statement and get it somehow verbatim into the answer.
Thus, if the question is 'why did Mussolini invade Abyssinia in 1935-6', at some point write the words 'Mussolini invaded Abyssinia in 1935-6 because...' so the examiner cannot even suspect that you are failing directly to answer the question.

You only need to do this once, and the best place to do this is by, at the end, always finishing with a conclusion which summarises your answer, and explicitly takes everything you have said into account (thus making it relevant), e.g. starting:
'Thus, having considered all of the above, it seems that Mussolini invaded Abyssinia in 1935-6 because...'

The other big MUST is to work out how long you have for each question.
Divide the number of minutes available by the total number of marks to get a 'time per mark'; exams always tell you how many marks there are for each question, so you can work out how long you have.

#5 r2live

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 11:24 AM

Thanks sir,

That was all I needed, :)




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