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William Of Perth

william rochester cathedral curious

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#1 HistoryRules

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 07:56 PM

Hello. This is HistoryRules. I am going on a school trip to Rochester,Kent. For homework we had to research on famous people to do with the Rochester Cathedral. I could not find some of the answers. One of them is where was William of Perth buried in the Rochester Cathedral or was that John Fisher only?
Please help whenever possible! ^_^
HistoryRules!

#2 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 08:39 PM

I used to work near Rochester. It's a lovely cathedral city with a fantastic stone keep castle next door. There was lots of fighting there in 1215. However, that's not what you asked. I think you should have a look at this page about Rochester Cathedral which should help. I hope you enjoy your trip. It's always good to get out of the classroom and see where history was made.

#3 HistoryRules

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Posted 24 June 2012 - 01:56 PM

Thank you very much! I didn't know it was a keep castle! Please can you answer one more question? Why was the cathedral built in Rochester?

#4 MrJohnDClare

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Posted 24 June 2012 - 03:27 PM

Rochester Cathedral, of course, dates back to 604, way before our time.

It was rebuilt by the Normans, starting in 1083, by a guy called Bishop Gundulf; the Normans did this firstly to honour God, secondly to provide a place where the priests could tell the Saxons to obey the Normans, and thirdly to be so hugely amazing that the Saxons did not even think of trying to rebel against people who were so powerful they could build cathedrals like that.

There was more building work in the 13th century, after the Cathedral became a place of pilgrimage to celebrate the death of Williamof Perth:

"A Place of Pilgrimage - The Cathedral became a major place of pilgrimage in the 13th century, following the death of William of Perth, a Scottish baker who was murdered nearby. His body was brought to the Cathedral and at his shrine, of which no trace remains, miracles were reported. Modern pilgrims who journey to the Cathedral still climb the Pilgrim Steps, now worn by the many thousands of medieval pilgrims visiting the shrine, often lighting candles at the William of Perth prayer-station in front of the oratory. Visitors who journey to the Cathedral today a re direct descendents of those early pilgrims."



#5 HistoryRules

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 10:16 PM

Rochester Cathedral, of course, dates back to 604, way before our time.

It was rebuilt by the Normans, starting in 1083, by a guy called Bishop Gundulf; the Normans did this firstly to honour God, secondly to provide a place where the priests could tell the Saxons to obey the Normans, and thirdly to be so hugely amazing that the Saxons did not even think of trying to rebel against people who were so powerful they could build cathedrals like that.

There was more building work in the 13th century, after the Cathedral became a place of pilgrimage to celebrate the death of Williamof Perth:

"A Place of Pilgrimage - The Cathedral became a major place of pilgrimage in the 13th century, following the death of William of Perth, a Scottish baker who was murdered nearby. His body was brought to the Cathedral and at his shrine, of which no trace remains, miracles were reported. Modern pilgrims who journey to the Cathedral still climb the Pilgrim Steps, now worn by the many thousands of medieval pilgrims visiting the shrine, often lighting candles at the William of Perth prayer-station in front of the oratory. Visitors who journey to the Cathedral today a re direct descendents of those early pilgrims."


Was he killed by Henry VIIII??

#6 Mr. D. Bryant

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 10:48 PM

Was he killed by Henry VIIII??


Not in the 13th century (1200s)! However, perhaps you mean that his shrine - where he was buried - was destroyed during the religious changes during Henry VIII's reign. I don't know; I will try to find out. Bishop John Fisher was executed while Henry VIII was King.




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